DT 26178

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 26178

Hints and tips by Big Dave

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BD Rating – Difficulty ** Enjoyment ***

The usual Wednesday fare from Jay. Comparatively easy and scrupulously fair. Let’s hope the Clueless Club members enjoy this one!

Leave a comment telling us what you thought. You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.


Across

8a    Appropriate way in which Ezra introduced himself? (7)
{IMPOUND} – a word meaning to appropriate could be the way that this American poet introduces himself (1’1,5)

10a    Not even degree students can be eccentric (7)
{ODDBALL} – add together not even (in the numerical sense), a Bachelor of Arts degree and two Learners (students) to get this word meaning eccentric

11a    Dollars initially invested in victory might provide a source of energy (9)
{WINDPOWER} – put the initial letter of Dollars between (invested in) a victory and might, as in strength, and you get a eco-friendly source of energy – it’s not often that the Telegraph slips up on the enumeration, but this should be (4,5)

12a    Praise army officer after cut back (5)
{EXALT} – a synonym for to praise is constructed from by putting a lieutenant after a word meaning cut is reversed

13a    Condescend to listen to European (5)
{DEIGN} – a word meaning to condescend sounds like (to listen to) Dane E(uropean) – a homophone that really does work!

14a    Plan no deceit — no time for such a remedy (7)
{CODEINE} – plan here is indicating that an anagram of NO DECEI(T) without the T (no time) gives this medicine used as an analgesic and antitussive (remedy) – it is derived from morphine and the word comes from the Greek kōdeia which means poppy-head

17a    Plant genre improves in process (7,8)
{EVENING PRIMROSE} – this plant is an anagram (process) of GENRE IMPROVES IN – quite clever having the word genre as part of the anagram fodder!


19a    Treat skin with mousse, love and fruit (7)
{TANGELO} – wordsum time – to treat animal skin with a mousse and a score of love at tennis combine for this fruit that is a popular answer on the TV program Countdown

21a    Start working and fight (3,2)
{SET TO} – a double definition

24a    A way to take in company’s course (5)
{ASCOT} – inside A ST(reet) place the usual abbreviation for CO(mpany) to get this Royal racecourse

26a    Sailor despatched around world is like a sponge (9)
{ABSORBENT} – the usual two-letter sailor is followed by a word meaning despatched placed around a world, or celestial body, to give a word meaning like a sponge

27a    A chute and a bouncy castle (7)
{CHÂTEAU} – bouncy has nothing to do with the castle, but indicates that an anagram of A CHUTE and A does

28a    Endless pain following month in shape (7)
{DECAGON} – AGON(Y) (endless pain) follows the last month of the year to give a ten-sided shape

Down

1d           Considered getting married after struggle (6)
{VIEWED} – this word meaning considered comes from WED (married) after VIE (struggle)

2d           Military order logs to be placed here (4,4)
{OPEN FIRE} – this military order is also where logs may be placed, or chestnuts may be roasted!

3d           Source of solvent messing up internet (10)
{TURPENTINE} – this tree is the source of the solvent of the same name (according to Chambers) – it’s an anagram (messing) of UP INTERNET

4d           Royal jester — one of three in a suit (5,4)
{COURT CARD} – what could mean a Royal jester is not the Joker but Jack, Queen or King

5d           Boundary crossed by landed gentry (4)
{EDGE} – this boundary is hidden inside (crossed by) landed gentry

6d           Country code accepted in most of letters (6)
{MALAWI} – to get this African country put the legal code inside MAI(L) (most of letters)

7d           Those in attendance are alert (3,5)
{ALL THERE} – a double definition  – the second one meaning completely sane

9d           Oxbridge academic accepts women drink (4)
{DOWN} – inside the Oxbridge academic place W(omen) to get a word meaning to drink or swallow

15d         Astounded by stupid son on lorry (10)
{DUMBSTRUCK} – a word meaning astounded is built up from one meaning stupid together with S(on) and a lorry

16d         One doesn’t know if it’s amusing or outrageous (9)
{IGNORAMUS} – this person who knows nothing is an anagram of AMUSING OR which is signalled by outrageous

17d         Admission to hospital department managed before church (8)
{ENTRANCE} – three of Crosswordland’s stalwarts combined together! – an admission, say a door, is built up from the Ear Nose and Throat department of a hospital, a word meaning managed and the Church of England

18d         Exposed route is rumoured to be of more importance (8)
{OUTWEIGH} – exposed, in the sense of not being inside, is combined with a word that sounds like (is rumoured) way (route) to give a word meaning  to be of more importance

20d         Drink in sort of trance (6)
{NECTAR} – the drink of the Gods is an anagram of TRANCE, signalled by “sort of”

22d         Pleasure trip that’s revealing (6)
{OUTING} – another double definition, the second part of which could be revealing one’s sexual preference – a pity that, as this one is so close to the first part of 18d, they couldn’t have been linked in some way

23d         Regularly buys lead secondhand (4)
{USED} – the even letters (regularly) of buys lead gives a word meaning secondhand

25d         Bound to be exhausted, disheartened (4)
{TIED} – remove the centre (disheartened) of TI(R)ED (exhausted) to get a word meaning bound

I hope you all enjoyed this one.


48 Comments

  1. AlanJ
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:32 am | Permalink

    Nice easy one but I had to look up 19a. Not a fruit I was familar with.

    • Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:35 am | Permalink

      Welcome (back) to the blog AlanJ

      You are obviously not a Countdown aficionado!

      • AlanJ
        Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:40 am | Permalink

        Still at work when Countdown is on. Can’t win them all.

    • Vince
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:36 am | Permalink

      I’m with you there, Alan. We obviously should watch Countdown!

      • Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:38 am | Permalink

        I wouldn’t go that far! I stopped watching it when the lovely Carol was replaced by a bimbo with a squeaky voice.

        • Vince
          Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:45 am | Permalink

          I’m looking forward to retirement, so I can watch it. I’m too old to be that fussy. A bimbo will do for me!!!

        • Mark J
          Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:54 am | Permalink

          ‘Bimbo’ is rather harsh…and a little low-brow for a wordsmiths’ site.

          • Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:56 am | Permalink

            It’s my honest opinion! Welcome Mark

            • Mark J
              Posted March 3, 2010 at 12:01 pm | Permalink

              Thank you. Nice to be here…

        • BigBoab
          Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:16 pm | Permalink

          Not often I am at odds with you Dave, Rachel Riley is neither a bimbo or squeaky voiced, but a lovely young girl who is extremely gifted mathematically and who has a delightful personality. (Not to mention the lovliest legs on telly) I enjoyed the crossword very much my favourite clues being 4d and 16d.

          • mary
            Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

            Used to have a dog called Bimbo, he was intelligent too and had four nice legs but not much of a personality :)

          • Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:32 pm | Permalink

            There are many more like this on YouTube!

            [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSE195fa72w&rel=0&w=247&h=200]

      • Geoff
        Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:11 pm | Permalink

        Gave up on it completely when the comedians took over.

        • Lea
          Posted March 3, 2010 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

          Agree with you but who can say that Jeff Stelling is a comedian – he is an appalling presenter and the worst of that show. I am sure a lot of us ladies would love Rachel’s legs – to quote a male friend of mine – they go on forever.

          See even in other things there is always disagreement and discussion.

  2. gnomethang
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:56 am | Permalink

    Another lovely puzzle from Jay. As you say, not the most difficult but v. fair and some fun wordplay.
    The fruit was last to go in and I had to check to confirm the wordplay – it is actually a hybrid cross of a tangerine and a pomelo.
    Thanks to BD and to Jay

  3. mary
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    Enjoyed todays thank you Jay, still some work involved for me but enjoyment at the end of it, can’t say I had a favourite clue though, nice one for CC, though not all straightforward

  4. Geoff
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

    Much better day for the CC. Top half all in place today, though no idea for one or two of them – thought the Ezra reference was to the OT book for some time. A few problems in the lower half, not helped by having 16/18d wrong. Completely missed the rather fun indicator BOUNCY.

    Thanks for the review BD, you make them look so easy! Hopefully I’ve learned something today.

    • gnomethang
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 1:20 pm | Permalink

      That was my favourite, Geoff.

      • Geoff
        Posted March 3, 2010 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

        Mine too, now I understand it!

        • mary
          Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:27 pm | Permalink

          I was thinking of Ezra from OT too Geoff never heard of the other, though i got the answer, then googled it to see who he was!

  5. Patsyann
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:01 pm | Permalink

    It would be good if compilers stopped using ‘dumb’ as meaning stupid. I have a lovely friend who has been unable to hear or speak since birth and she is certainly not stupid.

  6. Barrie
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:10 pm | Permalink

    Must be shellshocked from yesterday but I still found this a tricky puzzle!

    • mary
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:29 pm | Permalink

      It wasn’t all plain sailing Barrie, but ‘doable’ with a little help from various books and electronic sources :)

      • Geoff
        Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

        Have to admit to a little ‘research’ here and there, alas. But it got me started.

    • Barrie
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

      Finished eventually but def not easy! Still don’t understand what Ezra has to do with impound? And what on earth is a Tangelo, they sure don’t sell them in Tescos :-) Took me ages to get 2d but must admit its a very clever clue.

      • Libellule
        Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

        Barrie,
        Re 8a , read the answer as I am Pound – that is shortened to I’m Pound, a longer form would be I’m Ezra Pound for example.
        According to Wikipedia a tangelo is “a citrus fruit that is a hybrid of a tangerine and either a pomelo or a grapefruit. It may have originated in Southeast Asia over 3,500 years ago “

        • Barrie
          Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

          Ah no wonder I can’t find them in Tescos :-)
          Thanks for the explanation, I must google Ezra Pound and find out who he is.

          • Libellule
            Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

            An American poet and critic. He was also responsible for editing TS Eliot’s poem “The Wasteland”.

            • gnomethang
              Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:04 pm | Permalink

              I believe that Ezra Pound was Eliot’s teacher/mentor – I think that a credit at the start of the Wasteland is something like “The best Teacher” in Greek – been a long time, though!

              • Barrie
                Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

                Ah that explains the clue. Never heard of him myself or read any T S Eliot, science has always been my mainstream and I am afraid my knowledge of the Arts is sadly lacking. I can explain genetic profiling and DNA synthesis if you like :-)

                • gnomethang
                  Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

                  Not much anagram fodder there, Barrie!

              • Libellule
                Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

                Gnomethang,
                100% correct also, the start of “The Wasteland” has a Latin and Greek epigraph from The Satyricon of Petroniusa followed by “For Ezra Pound”, and then a quote from Dante’s purgatory “il miglior fabbro”, loosely translated as meaning “The better craftsman”.

                • Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

                  For someone like me, American Literature is an oxymoron!

                  • Libellule
                    Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:28 pm | Permalink

                    Dave,
                    Like all literature, theres some thats good and theres some thats bad….

  7. Ann B
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

    Really enjoyed today & completed before lunch with no recourse to hints.
    Now afternoon cuppa & the toughie/

    • mary
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

      Well done ann the day I can achieve that is the day i will qualify to move out of the CC….!

      • Franny
        Posted March 3, 2010 at 4:58 pm | Permalink

        The thing is, Mary, that for every one I sail through (like today’s) there are dozens where I get hopelessly stuck. Hence my permanent membership in the CC … I’ve never dared look at the toughie!

  8. Little Dave
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

    Spent all day yesterday distracted and despite buying the paper did not open it so crossword 26,177 completely passed me by.

    Today’s was a gentle canter over a latte when waiting for my car to be cleaned. I now have a completed crossword and a gleaming vehicle. An England win yesterday too!

    Back to work tomorrow so no chance to check on the bimbo assessment.

  9. Lizwhiz1
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

    Yes a nice easy one today.. but then it is finished too quickly! No excuse to avoid the ironing :(
    Best clued was 13a!
    Isn’t it good to see some sunshine! ;) ;)

  10. Nubian
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 3:49 pm | Permalink

    Good quality again today, it’s strange how a good crossword flows, not just in the surface reading but also in the way the clues seem to lead one into the other and a gentle pace is realised right through to the last answer.
    Definately something mystical
    du de du do du de do du……

  11. Little Dave
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

    Lizwhiz1 – your comment about chores reminded me of the man who purchased a new bag and belt for his wife for her birthday and commented that the vacuum cleaner was then working perfecly for her.

    That should provoke a reply or two!

    • Chablisdiamond
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 5:22 pm | Permalink

      That reminds me of the man who bought alloy wheels for his wife for her birthday so for his next birthday she bought him…….diamond earrings!!!! I believe that to be a true story. I have also to admit that my husband bought debentures at Twickenham for a wedding anniversary present – so that we could spend quality time together! Hum!

    • Lizwhiz1
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 6:12 pm | Permalink

      Thanks! Alas I am in sole charge of all pressies here.. I buy one form myself every chritmas and birthday as my hubby died a couple of years ago rather unexpectedly! Still have a shed full of metal lathes and milling machines if anyone knows anyone who understands those things!!!!

      Hey ho! ;)

  12. Franny
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 4:45 pm | Permalink

    This was a lovely puzzle and, as a permanent member of the Clueless Club, exactly at my level.Thank you, Jay, I must be on your wavelength. I enjoyed the clues, especially 8a and the great anagram at 17a, and just smiled my way through, finishing almost in time to get the bonus points on Clued Up and without recourse to electronic or printed help. Enough of blowing my own trumpet, but I found this most encouraging. :-)

  13. Chablisdiamond
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 5:29 pm | Permalink

    What a wonderful puzzel, so much fun and right up my street, my only real hiccup was thinking ‘exposed route’ was ‘out ‘because route was exposed ie had it’s ends taken off and therefore was struggling to find a word for rumored that made any sense. Duh.

    • Geoff
      Posted March 3, 2010 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

      Similar thoughts here, chablisd; exposed = OUT, route = ST, just couldn’t work out why RIP might mean rumour; it didn’t, wrong answer …!

  14. Prolixic
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 7:10 pm | Permalink

    Nice puzzle from Jay today – straightforward but with a few more tricky clues to stop you becoming complacent. Thanks to Jay and to BD for the notes.

  15. Derek
    Posted March 3, 2010 at 11:06 pm | Permalink

    Very enjoyable puzzle today!
    After wasting time with Ezra in the OT (I actually read the lot after many, many years – a bit tiresome – the synopsis in Pears is quicker!) then not the penny but the pound note dropped!
    Or is it a coin nowadays?
    17a was a nice anagram.
    Best for me were : 8a,13a, 19a, 27a & 28a. 2d, 6d 15d & 18d.