DT 27506

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 27506

Hints and tips by Gazza

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty **Enjoyment **

We have a pretty straightforward puzzle today without much to get excited about. Do let us know what you thought and how you got on.

You can see an actual answer by highlighting what’s concealed between the brackets under the relevant clue.

Across Clues

1a Any thug could become wayward (7)
{NAUGHTY} – an anagram (could become) of ANY THUG.

5a Dedicated diet regularly ticked the box for Cameron perhaps? (7)
{DEVOTED} – the odd (regularly) letters of diet followed by a verb meaning ticked the box for a candidate such as Cameron D. Does this really work? In the UK we mark our ballot papers with a cross rather than a tick.

9a Snack item crisis — is going for peanuts initially (5)
{CRISP} – start with the word crisis then replace the last IS with the initial letter of peanuts. Even though it’s pretty obvious here which IS has to be replaced there are two and an indication of which one’s for the chop would be good.

10a Where one worships domestic animal the man had? Really, on a regular basis! (9)
{CATHEDRAL} – string together a domestic animal, a contracted version of ‘the man had’ and the odd letters of really.

11a Top actress excited viewers (10)
{SPECTATORS} – an anagram (excited) of TOP ACTRESS.

12a Splendid religious instruction by church (4)
{RICH} – two abbreviations, firstly that for religious instruction and then one for church.

14a Broken tip? Repair’s no sweat (12)
{PERSPIRATION} – an anagram (broken) of TIP REPAIR’S NO.

18a Right to go into mass meeting with hospital department’s demands (12)
{REQUIREMENTS} – insert R(ight) into a type of Mass for the repose of the souls of the dead and follow that (meeting) with Crosswordland’s usual hospital department and the ‘S.

21a Jack has trouble having a stretch here? (4)
{JAIL} – the abbreviation for a jack in a pack of cards followed by a verb to trouble or afflict.

22a Exaggerating time spent in 21 in heart of Bangkok (10)
{STRETCHING} – an informal word for time spent in 21a is followed by IN (from the clue) and the middle (heart) letter of Bangkok. It seems very sloppy to have an answer which appears in the previous clue, especially when the two clues are linked.

25a Places for storing trophies around table (9)
{CUPBOARDS} – trophies or prizes go around a table or plank of wood.

26a Fool going round following the French language (5)
{LATIN} – reverse (going round) an informal word for fool and append it to one of the words for ‘the’ in French.

27a Horse might be  stuck (7)
{SADDLED} – two meanings, the second meaning stuck or lumbered with something unpleasant or burdensome.

28a Generally slow, skipping round city in Cambridgeshire (7)
{LARGELY} – a musical direction dictating a slow tempo loses (skipping) its round letter and that’s followed by a 3-letter city in Cambridgeshire.

Down Clues

1d Best city street (6)
{NICEST} – a city in the south of France followed by the abbreviation for street.

2d Joined college with Edward (6)
{UNITED} – a 3-letter abbreviation meaning university or college followed by one of the shortened forms of Edward.

3d Is the shop opening in Yeominster? Fantastic idea (10)
{HYPOTHESIS} – an anagram (fantastic) of IS THE SHOP and the opening letter of Y(eominster).

4d River rising with children trapped in boat (5)
{YACHT} – reverse (rising, in a down clue) a Scottish river and insert the abbreviation for children.

5d Decide to stop explosive device (9)
{DETERMINE} – a charade of a verb to stop or stave off and an explosive device.

6d Contend with women’s opinion (4)
{VIEW} – a verb to contend or compete is followed by W(omen).

7d Almost frighten one Conservative? Splendid (8)
{TERRIFIC} – start with a verb to frighten or scare stiff and take off its final Y (almost). Now add the Roman numeral for one and C(onservative).

8d Old ship at sea coming across new sea creatures (8)
{DOLPHINS} – an anagram (at sea) of OLD SHIP contains (coming across) N(ew).

13d Special piano at a joint (10)
{PARTICULAR} – the abbreviation for the musical instruction piano is followed by an adjective meaning at or near a joint.

15d Secluded trees held nuts (9)
{SHELTERED} – an anagram (nuts) of TREES HELD.

16d Launches  proposals (8)
{PROJECTS} – double definition, the first (with the emphasis on the second syllable) a verb meaning launches or throws.

17d Joked after house finally is furnished (8)
{EQUIPPED} – a verb meaning joked comes after the final letter of (hous)E.

19d Be leaving rubbish? That’s petty (6)
{LITTLE} – start with a verb to rubbish or disparage and remove the BE from its beginning.

20d Means  business (6)
{AGENCY} – two definitions – the first an action or intervention that produces an effect and the second a service business.

23d Sly person cutting wife’s artistic aid (5)
{EASEL} – this is a metaphor for a sly or deceitful person without its initial W (cutting wife).

24d Black bird’s food container (4)
{BOWL} – B(lack) followed by a wise bird.

None of the clues really stood out for me today. How about you?

Today’s Quickie Pun: {CAUGHT} + {CHOOSE} = {COURT SHOES}



56 Comments

  1. Wahoo
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:16 am | Permalink

    Nothing challenging about that – a little dull in fact. */ and, just (because of 10a), ** for enjoyment.

  2. Kath
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:30 am | Permalink

    2* difficulty but maybe a little bit more for enjoyment.
    The only spot of bother I had was all my own fault. My 26a language was “Lassa” which was stupid. I knew the tropical disease and looked it up in BRB to see if it’s a language as well – it isn’t but couldn’t think of anything better so put it in. Oh dear. That slowed me up with 19 and 20d until I decided to have a rethink.
    I agree this wasn’t the most exciting of crosswords but I liked 11 and 27a. My favourite was 8d.
    With thanks to Mr Ron and gazza.
    Grey, gloomy and drizzly in Oxford.

    • Miffypops
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:59 am | Permalink

      Lassa is a language and a dialect Kath http://globalrecordings.net/en/language/13717 It is also what I put in first. It didn’t last though

      • Kath
        Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

        Not quite so daft then?! Pity it’s not in BRB, screwed up the rest of that corner and was just plain wrong.

        • skempie
          Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

          But Kath, surely if it had been in the BRB, you would have convinced yourself it was correct and still be stuck on the checking words

          • Kath
            Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:44 pm | Permalink

            I managed to convince myself, briefly, that it was correct even though it wasn’t in BRB. We live and learn – well maybe, in my case, we just live! http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/icon_rolleyes.gif

    • Toni
      Posted June 4, 2014 at 4:34 pm | Permalink

      I had it too. I think it counts as a good guess!http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_rose.gif

  3. skempie
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:32 am | Permalink

    Can’t say that this puzzle did much for me. Too many anagrams again and I also thought 22A a very sloppy clue and I can’t say that 19D was overly cryptic.
    Only bright spot for me was 18A – a very clever clue.

  4. BigBoab
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:34 am | Permalink

    Another very gentle wee crossword today quite suitable to a dour Tuesday morning up here on the Fife coast. Thanks to the setter and to Gazza for the pictorial review. I thought the Warbler toughie also a gentle offering today.

    • Wahoo
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

      I agree re Warbler’s Toughie – even 5d! – The compilers today seem to want to make things easier on such a drab day!

    • Una
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:40 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for that tip, I have just completed it , all except for 14d, the dreaded spoonerism.

      • Wahoo
        Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:00 pm | Permalink

        I’ll probably get told off, but think of what Bertie Wooster might say when leaving his pals at Drones

        • gazza
          Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:06 pm | Permalink

          Please don’t give hints for other puzzles except on the relevant blog – some people will have saved it to do later.

    • Miffypops
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:58 pm | Permalink

      The East Neuk Of Fife Big Boab. Arnstruther for a Fish Supper. This fishmongers in St Andrews for Arbroath Smokies. Crail to buy Crab and lobster as fresh as you like. Pittenweem to watch the Langoustine being landed and a race up to St Monans to buy as many langoustine as the nice man will let you have. Remove the trails (full of s**t and grit) boil for five minutes. Eat slobber and go to heaven.

      • Merusa
        Posted June 3, 2014 at 4:06 pm | Permalink

        Pittenweem … one of the prettiest little places I have ever seen!

        • Miffypops
          Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:47 pm | Permalink

          It got a lot prettier when the langoustine arrived

  5. bifield
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:52 am | Permalink

    No problems today but overall a bit dull Favourite was 18A. Thanks to setter and to Gazza for the review which I found more entertaining than the crossword.

  6. Una
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:55 am | Permalink

    I agree with all of Skempie’s points above,and I liked 5a as well.This puzzle felt a bit fusty, as if it had laid in a drawer for a very long time.Thanks setter and Gazza.

  7. Graham Wall
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:00 pm | Permalink

    Took me sometime to get into this and I did need half a dozen hints to complete. Thought a lot of the clues were awkward and clumsily constructed; because of this I would rate difficulty of 3.5 with a generous 1.5 for enjoyment. My thanks to Gazza for the review.

  8. Miffypops
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

    A tad too easy today
    I hope for better from Jay
    On Thursday Ray T’s not on
    Hurrah for Friday. It’s Don

    Doggerel what that I wrote. Thanks anyway to the setter, although easy to solve it cannot be easy even just filling a grid let alone writing the clues. Thanks also to Gazza who’s review I shall read whilst waiting for lunch to be served.

  9. Bluebird
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

    It was a pleasant **\**.

    I insisted to myself that 27a was ‘stalled’ for far too long. How clever of me, I thought!!
    Then 17d and 18a kept slipping away from me till I gave in on the horsey one……..http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/icon_lol.gif

    Didn’t call on you Gazza, but liked the kissing pic! Are they kissing, sea mammal experts?

  10. Angel
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:28 pm | Permalink

    Well, that certainly was a breeze but not really much fun. 10a takes the biscuit for convolution. “Nuts” indicator for 15a escaped me at first. */**. http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/icon_neutral.gif

    • Miffypops
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

      I am glad you said that Angel. It is not just me who mixes up clues and invents ones that are not there.

      • Angel
        Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:25 pm | Permalink

        Miffypops – “Great minds think alike” BUT “fools seldom differ” however “it’s the exception that proves the rule”?! http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_smile.gif

  11. Eleanor Patrick
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:44 pm | Permalink

    Just popped in for confirmation of 19D. Silly of me to miss the why of it! Easy today. Did it on my own. Usually hubby and I do it together with only the occasional saunter this way!

  12. mac
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

    I liked 8d

    • gazza
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:49 pm | Permalink

      Welcome to the blog mac.

    • Kath
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

      I liked 8d too.

  13. jean-luc cheval
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 12:56 pm | Permalink

    What a shame. No paper for me this morning. Managed to read Michael Deacon’s sketch on the net though. Quite funny as usual. Better luck tomorrow I hope. Still I have to go through toughie from 30th may. Something to do on this hot afternoon.

  14. SheilaP
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

    Some people thought this a little dull, but, because we could actually do it, we didn’t find it dull at all. Roll on the time when we find these cryptics easy enough to be dull. Not going to happen any time soon methinks. Thank you to the setter and to Gazza.

  15. Brian
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    3/4 of this was great but the bottom right was very tricky I thought.
    Don’t get 13d, surely if it was to do with a joint it would be articulate? And bit puzzled by 3d, is there some convention about taking the first letter of Yeominster that I have missed? Does the ‘opening’ serve a double purpose here as an anagram indicator and also the first letter?
    Enjoyed most of this one. Thx to Gazza for explaining some of my answers fully.

    • gazza
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

      13d Chambers gives ‘at or near a joint’ for articular (adjective).
      3d No double duty. The Y is indicated by the opening in Y(eominster) and the anagram indicator is fantastic.

    • Heno
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

      Hi Brian, 13d articular means jointed. I read 3d as, is the shop plus y is the fodder. Fantastic is the indicator, and idea is the definition.

      • Heno
        Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:27 pm | Permalink

        Gazza beat me to it, was just replying just after him :-)

        • Kath
          Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:48 pm | Permalink

          That happens to me all the time – so often in fact that I tend not to reply to a plea for help as I know that by the time I’ve done it someone else will have done it – and better. http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_sad.gif

    • Brian
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 4:42 pm | Permalink

      Thx Guys, now I get it http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_good.gif

  16. Heno
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to the setter and to Gazza for the review and hints. I enjoyed this one a lot, but I made it tricky for myself by only solving 21a at the third attempt. My first two answers were abed & brig. When I eventually got it right, I was then able to get 16d, which was last in. Favourites were 28a, 3&18d. Was 3*/3* for me. Sun out for half an hour in Central London.

  17. Sweet William
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

    Thank you setter. No problems and very enjoyable. I am finding the puzzles easier to do whilst away on holiday with absolutely no agenda for activity. Have even brought some old puzzles to tackle – one being the “flauberts parrot” puzzle ! Thanks Gazza for the review and hints

  18. Merusa
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 3:56 pm | Permalink

    I galloped through this one, but I didn’t find it dull at all. My favourite is 8d, but that’s perhaps because I love them so, such happy looking animals. I did need the hint to know why my 19d was correct as I would not have said the full word with the “be” is rubbish, but, of course, in the meaning of rubbishing someone I suppose it works. Thanks to setter and to Gazza for entertaining review.

  19. Poppy
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 4:02 pm | Permalink

    Pleased to finish this nice and early – so it proves how much this brilliant site helps. Thank you to setter and Gazza. Still recovering from Glyndebourne – our first ever visit – and it was even more amazing than I’d dreamed. Great weather for strolling in the grounds viewing some astonishingly elaborate picnic set ups. Gardens beautiful. Weather fine. Restaurant meal excellent, and as for the performance of Eugene Onegin – sublime. What an astounding piece of work. And our hosts only had to wait nineteen years to become members and thereby choose our seats in the 3rd row stalls! A glimpse into very different lives. Greetings to all. Poppy was thrilled to have us back and is in full song to audition herself for something (Banana Joe perhaps?!).

    • Merusa
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 4:11 pm | Permalink

      Glad you had such a good time. Give Poppy lots of love.

      • Poppy
        Posted June 3, 2014 at 6:42 pm | Permalink

        Thanks Merusa

        • Kath
          Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:52 pm | Permalink

          Glad you had such a good time – keep commenting. http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_smile.gif

          • Poppy
            Posted June 4, 2014 at 9:54 am | Permalink

            Thanks, Kath

  20. JonP
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 5:01 pm | Permalink

    Straightforward solve – nothing really held me up much but enjoyed it nonetheless (anything I can solve I enjoy). Thanks to setter and to Gazza for the hints which I didn’t need today. 1.5* / ***

  21. Michael
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 5:28 pm | Permalink

    I love an Anagramfest – especially if they’re long words – brilliant! http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_yahoo.gif

  22. Annidrum
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 5:33 pm | Permalink

    I quite enjoyed that and like Jon P anything I can solve I enjoy and I really like anagrams. Thanks to Setter and gazza for the review.

  23. A G Brown
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 6:41 pm | Permalink

    Needed a bit of help on S E corner other than that OK nice lot of anagrams rate it **|**today hate having to get help !but thank you Gazza for putting me back on the right track and to setter

  24. jean-luc cheval
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:24 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to gazza for the grid.. SE corner very messy for me . Thanks for the help.

  25. 2Kiwis
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 7:45 pm | Permalink

    It all slotted together without significant hold-ups for us. No complaints.
    Thanks Mr Ron and Gazza.

  26. Carrie
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 8:26 pm | Permalink

    I rarely (if ever) manage without help and I needed a fair bit of help with this.

    Thank you setter and Gazza

    • Miffypops
      Posted June 3, 2014 at 11:58 pm | Permalink

      Hello Carrie. It is a pleasure to be able to help anybody who needs help, and so nice to read their comments of thanks. Thank you for commenting.

  27. Little Dave
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 8:30 pm | Permalink

    All pretty uneventful but pleasant to solve. 19d did not quite work for me but I did like 3d for an anagram. It was all over too early but it did distract for some of the commute. Thank you to The Setter and to the Reviewer. http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_mail.gif

  28. Salty Dog
    Posted June 3, 2014 at 10:15 pm | Permalink

    1.5*/3*, l think, and no particular favourite clue. Still, thanks to the setter for giving the old get matter a workout, however gentle, and to Gazza for the review.

  29. Tstrummer
    Posted June 4, 2014 at 2:08 am | Permalink

    Straightforward and dull, I thought. No smiles. Easy anagrams. Hoped for something a little more taxing before turning to the guitar for some late-night picking. Still, I shall take comfort in the traditional refuge of the working man – beer. 1*/1*
    PS Thanks to Gazza for the review, as ever

  30. Reggie
    Posted June 4, 2014 at 8:23 am | Permalink

    Agree SE corner trickiest. Tried doing late in the evening after a beer or two and gave up. Finished easily this morning -I guessed the answer to 19d from part of the clue but have to thank Gazza for explaining the answer fully! SE corner definitely the trickiest.