DT 27001

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 27001

Hints and tips by Gazza

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty **Enjoyment ***

My normal routine was upset this morning because my printer decided that it was an ideal time to give up the ghost and I had to solve the puzzle on-line. I really missed having the printed sheet on which I normally count the anagrams, underline anagram fodder and mark my favourite clues. The puzzle itself was one of Giovanni’s gentler ones. Tell us what you thought.
If you want to see an answer let your cursor hover over the gap between the curly brackets under the clue.

Across Clues

5a  Time to get a round in concert — find the bar (7)
{

Spoiler

TAPROOM

[collapse]
} – T(ime) and A (from the clue) are followed by the abbreviation for a concert (like the ones given every Summer in London) with the round-looking letter inserted.

7a  The fellow protected by idiot remains (5)
{

Spoiler

ASHES

[collapse]
} – a male pronoun goes inside (protected by) an idiot.

9a  One embraced by enthusiast at church — he may go there to get wed (6)
{

Spoiler

FIANCE

[collapse]
} – I (the Roman numeral for one) is contained inside (embraced by) an enthusiast or supporter then we have to add one of the abbreviations for church.

10a  Obstructive, with a yen to be different (2,3,3)
{

Spoiler

IN THE WAY

[collapse]
} – an anagram (to be different) of WITH A YEN.

11a  Warning politician, I’d moan terribly at the start (10)
{

Spoiler

ADMONITORY

[collapse]
} – the definition here is an adjective, as in ‘a warning shot across the bows’. A right-wing politician is preceded (at the start) by an anagram (terribly) of I’D MOAN.

13a  I proceed to grab a villain (4)
{

Spoiler

IAGO

[collapse]
} – not any old villain but one of Shakespeare’s. I and a verb to proceed contain (to grab) A.

14a  One club redesigned with format not conducive to relaxation (13)
{

Spoiler

UNCOMFORTABLE

[collapse]
} – an anagram (redesigned) of ONE CLUB and FORMAT.

16a  Confront female expert (4)
{

Spoiler

FACE

[collapse]
} – the abbreviation for female followed by an expert.

17a  New car with Cellnet that can deal with phone messages (4,6)
{

Spoiler

CALL CENTRE

[collapse]
} – an anagram (new) of CAR and CELLNET. We all get frustrated trying to get through, in both senses, to people at these places, but the frustration is not all one way. Here are some real queries received:
On the screen it’s telling me to press any key to continue but my keyboard doesn’t have an ‘any’ key.
Does my European Breakdown Policy cover me when I’m driving in Australia?
The manual says to unplug the machine from the wall socket and telephone jack before cleaning, so can you give me Jack’s number?

19a  Canons in cold form of worship look retrogressive (8)
{
Spoiler

CRITERIA

[collapse]
} – canons here are not members of the clergy but rules. String together C(old), a solemn religious ceremony and the reversal (retrogressive) of a look or appearance.

20a  Like many a favourite relation, strange at first (4-2)
{

Spoiler

ODDS-ON

[collapse]
} – this is how many a favourite starts a race (so that if you back it and it wins you won’t make a lot of money). A male relation is preceded (at first) by a synonym for strange.

22a  Male on water? Yes, yes! (5)
{

Spoiler

DRAKE

[collapse]
} – the yes, yes indicates that this is both a male duck and a famous sailor.

23a  Cunning vision that accommodates the French (7)
{

Spoiler

SLEIGHT

[collapse]
} – another word for vision contains (accommodates) the French definite article (masculine singular version).

Down Clues

1d  Second joke presented by someone using words craftily? (4)
{

Spoiler

SPUN

[collapse]
} – S(econd) followed by a type of joke is what Alistair Campbell, for example, did for a living at one time.

2d  Only Conservative is beginning to make error (8)
{

Spoiler

SOLECISM

[collapse]
} – this type of error can be to incorrectly split an infinitive, for example, or to make some sort of social gaffe like eating your peas off a knife. It’s a charade of a) an adjective meaning only, b) the single-character abbreviation for Conservative, c) IS (from the clue) and d) the beginning of M(ake).

3d  You want kitchen vessel? Then go where the food’s kept (6)
{

Spoiler

PANTRY

[collapse]
} – a kitchen vessel followed by a go or attempt.

4d  Finally throw end of loaf that is black in recycling container? (7,3)
{

Spoiler

WHEELIE BIN

[collapse]
} – start with the final letter of (thro)W and add a word which can mean the crusty end of a loaf (I was unaware of this usage), the abbreviation for ‘that is’, B(lack) and IN.

5d  Chord one gets in a type of jazz (5)
{

Spoiler

TRIAD

[collapse]
} – insert I (one) in a style of jazz to make a chord of three notes.

6d  Joan takes Isle of Man road the wrong way (4,2,7)
{

Spoiler

MAID OF ORLEANS

[collapse]
} – an anagram (the wrong way) of ISLE OF MAN ROAD  produces someone whom we know as Joan but whose compatriots call Jeanne.

8d  Special corner, a bright spot (7)
{

Spoiler

SPANGLE

[collapse]
} – the two-character abbreviation of special is followed by a corner to make a spot of bright colour. Whatever happened to those sweets which were a favourite of mine? Here’s an advert that you wouldn’t see today:

12d  Bands on the move in others’ cars (10)
{

Spoiler

ORCHESTRAS

[collapse]
} – an anagram (on the move) of OTHERS’ CARS.

14d  Like a secret opinion that’s stuffy? (7)
{

Spoiler

UNAIRED

[collapse]
} – double definition, the second a description of the atmosphere if you don’t open a window, say.

15d  After sign of approval maiden perhaps becomes idle (4,4)
{

Spoiler

TICK OVER

[collapse]
} – a sign of approval (if you’ve got your sums right, for example) is followed by what a maiden is an example of in cricket.

17d  Former President in vehicle with Her Majesty (6)
{

Spoiler

CARTER

[collapse]
} – a vehicle followed by the letters identifying our current Queen.

18d  Australian mammals need time to find shelter (5)
{

Spoiler

ROOST

[collapse]
} – an informal word for Australian mammals is followed by (needs) T(ime).

21d  Accommodation evoking snide comments (4)
{

Spoiler

DIGS

[collapse]
} – double definition, the first an informal word for accommodation or lodgings.

The clues I liked best were 20a and 6d. How about you?

Today’s Quickie Pun: {

Spoiler

SEEMS

[collapse]
} + {
Spoiler

TRESS

[collapse]
} = {
Spoiler

SEAMSTRESS

[collapse]
}

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49 Comments

  1. mary
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:05 am | Permalink

    Morning gazza, love the comments at 17a :-D , I agree one of the gentler Giovanni puzzles, fav clues 6d and 3d, spangles, I used to love them, I think you can still get them from retro sweet shops?

  2. Only fools
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:06 am | Permalink

    Very enjoyable 2.5/3.5 for me .Liked pretty much everything about it including the odd smile.Thanks

  3. mary
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:08 am | Permalink

    gazza, without wanting to seem too picky, 14a and 17a these anagrams seem to indicate words that are then linked by another word, so I didn’t see it at first because I was looking for an anagram of ‘one club’ with another word for format to give the answer, the same in 17a, if you see what I mean?

    • Prolixic
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:15 am | Permalink

      Part of the misdirection that setters employ. If you read the clues as

      14a A mixed up with B gives C
      17a Mix up A and (with) B to give C

      Then the clues work.

      • mary
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:17 am | Permalink

        Hi Prolixic, nice to ‘see’ you :-) , thanks for that, I do see what you mean, it’s just some things don’t sit right in my head!!! Must be my head ;-)

    • gazza
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:16 am | Permalink

      I understand what you mean. I don’t see any problem with 17a but I’m not keen on anagrams like 14a where the indicator appears in the middle of the fodder.

      • mary
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:19 am | Permalink

        Thanks gazza, I’m glad it’s not just me then :-)

  4. Prolixic
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    The contrast between today’s crossword by Giovanni and yesterday’s Toughie shows his skill at setting crosswords with differing levels of difficulty. A one stopper for me today but enjoyable as ever. Thanks to him and to Gazza for the review.

    • gnomethang
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

      I’m with Prolixic here. This was a fun solve without being dictionary-heavy.
      I have seen gazza’s comment on 14a but I consider it fair game if expressed correctly (with an ‘and’ or ‘with’ etc.) I kinda liked the clue.
      Thanks to gazza and Giovanni.

  5. Jezza
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:14 am | Permalink

    This one was at the opposite end of the scale compared to his toughie yesterday.
    Apart from 5a, and 19a, all the across clues went in on the first run.
    1*/3.5* for me.
    Thanks to Giovanni, and to Gazza.

    The toughie today is enjoyable, reasonably gentle, and with a nice theme.

    • mary
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:21 am | Permalink

      5a last one in for me too Jezza

      • Jezza
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:31 am | Permalink

        It’s quite ironic really, seeing as I have spent a fair amount of time in them over the years! :)

  6. Colmce
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:19 am | Permalink

    Absolutely sailed through this one, so it must have been easier than normal. Record time as well… Measured on the little hand still… a stopwatch is an aspiration.

    Lots of really nice clues, but as always made things more difficult by missing an obvious anagrind .

    Thanks to Gazza for the review.

    Thanks to Giovanni for an enjoyable puzzle.

    • gnomethang
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

      NIce one, Centurion!

  7. Heno
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:23 am | Permalink

    Thanks to the two G’s. Enjoyed this one a lot, 2*/3* for me. Started with 1d, finished with 19a. Favourites were 6d&14a, was surprised how many anagrams there were. Off to the races at Cheltenham :-)

  8. Kath
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:52 am | Permalink

    I agree with everyone else – I thought it was one of Giovanni’s gentler puzzles – 2* for difficulty and probably a bit nearer 4* for enjoyment. While I was doing it the brain registered quite a lot of anagrams but I’ve counted now and only make it six – the brain was wrong!
    Got a bit held up with the last few – 5 and 19a and 17d. Because it’s Friday I was thinking of something musical for the canons and just couldn’t get beyond that. The problem with 17d was just me being slow – thought the vehicle was a car and never thought of cart!! I needed the hints to explain the ‘Yes, yes’ bit of 22a and, although I know the word ‘solecism’ I couldn’t have told anyone what it meant.
    Lots of good clues including 14 and 17a (telephone jack gave me the giggles!) and 4, 6 and 18d.
    With thanks to Giovanni and Ggazza – not a typo, just totally confused now about who has a capital letter and who doesn’t and would hate to upset anyone! :smile:

    • gazza
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 11:56 am | Permalink

      You may spell my name however you like, Kath.

      • Kath
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

        :smile:

  9. Beaver
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:00 pm | Permalink

    All seem in general agreement that today’s was a bit of a stroll when compared to yesterday’s say * or ** with a*** enjoyment.Gone are the days when Friday crosswords were always the most difficult of the week with a gradual build up from Monday( designed to be easy with hangover’s in mind!) Mary is not alone in remembering spangles-jeuness doree days indeed-tuck shop revisited!

  10. Brian
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

    Very enjoyable Friday offering. Thx to Gazza for explaining the yes yes in 22a which passed be by. Agree completely with the difficulty rating. Learnt a new word in 2d, and a new meaning for Triad, I thought they were Chinese gangsters!

    • mary
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:11 pm | Permalink

      Yes same for me Brian, 2d new word and 5d new meaning

      • Sweet William
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:31 pm | Permalink

        Same with me – I started thinking of “third” for 5d, which is a chord I believe ?

        Thank you Giovanni and Gazza for your review.

        Pommers, I feel that I unwittingly lured you into disclosing your yesterday’s ##@$$ solving time ! I trust that you had blotting paper down your pants before seeing The Beak ?

  11. skempie
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:42 pm | Permalink

    Look who’s back – finished my latest 6 month stint of doing something called ‘work’ and am free for wee while again.

    Very enjoyable solve today (as the Don’s normally are), I especially enjoyed the anagram at 14A and today’s fave rave has to be 19A – very cleverly constructed clue. Well, guess its off to find something to do in the garden now ……

    • mary
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 12:48 pm | Permalink

      nice to see you skempie :-)

    • spindrift
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

      Hi Skempie – just had delivered the latest offering from Sir T. – “A blink in the sun”. one for the true aficionados of the work of Lord Pterry (too soon?) – highly recommend it to you.

      • skempie
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 3:36 pm | Permalink

        I think it arrived at my Wife’s father’s home last week when I happened to be there – big Amazon book sized package that she refused to open !

  12. Peter
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:03 pm | Permalink

    Here comes the lone voice of disagreement.

    Having finished yesterday’s without any help, I got completely stuck on the left hand side of the puzzle, so for me I have to give a 3*/2*

    Not complaining, merely moaning!

    Thank you Giovanni and Gazza for your review.

    • mary
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:19 pm | Permalink

      The left hand side was more difficult than the right for me too Peter

      • Peter
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 2:02 pm | Permalink

        Hi Mary

        I’m so glad its not just me. Come to think of it our views coincide quite frequently – now is that spooky, or are we bad crossworders?

        • mary
          Posted October 19, 2012 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

          we’ll go for the first option I think ;-)

  13. Big Boab
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

    Many thankst to Giovanni and to Gazza, a very enjoyable crossword, despite the anagrams, and a very entertaining review.

  14. Roger
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:47 pm | Permalink

    Really enjoyable particularly as I romped through it in record time. It all just seemed to flow and so 4* for enjoyment. Thanks to Giovanni and Gazza

  15. John Major
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

    Am I the only one to take issue with calling a kangaroo a mammal (18 down)? I’m clearly a lot newer to c/words than the obvious experts who have commented before me, so didn’t find today’s one as simple as others have….and this clue didn’t help me!

    • crypticsue
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 2:18 pm | Permalink

      They are part of a group of particular type of mammals – according to my sources anyway, so the answer to your question is probably yes.

    • mary
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 2:32 pm | Permalink

      Hi JM it’s always good to query things you’re not sure of, everyone is very helpful and patient as I’ve found out, I seem to be forever querying things! Not all of us here are experts but improve daily with the help of those who are :-)

    • skempie
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 3:38 pm | Permalink

      John – a kangaroo is a marsupial which is a branch of the order (?) of mammals. The definition of a mammal is a creature that gives milk to its offspring which Kangaroos most certainly do.

    • una
      Posted October 20, 2012 at 7:45 pm | Permalink

      its a marsupial mammel

  16. SheilaP
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

    Nice crossword today, straightforward clues. Thank you very much.

  17. crypticsue
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

    A lovely entertaining review as usual from gazza and a particularly straightforward puzzle from Giovanni. Thank you to both of them. I liked 22a best.

    • mary
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 2:14 pm | Permalink

      I loved the comments at 17a sue, hard to believe :-D

      • skempie
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 3:41 pm | Permalink

        Best one I ever heard was of a boss type guy that phoned a helpdesk:

        ‘I’ve just bought a modem from you and I canm’t get it to work. Either you fix it or I’ll come down on you like a ton of bricks and I’ll sue you until you can’t afford a cup of coffe. Now, fix it for me or else’

        ‘Certainly Sir, can I ask what model of computer you have it attachedto?’

        ‘Computer?’

        • mary
          Posted October 19, 2012 at 4:00 pm | Permalink

          :-)

  18. eXternal
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

    nice puzzle as always from Giovanni. Favourite was 22a, something a little different

    • gnomethang
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 7:25 pm | Permalink

      Agreed!

  19. Derek
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 5:38 pm | Permalink

    A gentle puzzle from The Don today.

    My faves were – 22a & 6d.

    Weather still VG here in NL – the heating comes on in the morning though!

    Fish and Chips tonight as usual.

  20. Addicted
    Posted October 19, 2012 at 5:58 pm | Permalink

    Only just logged in – needed some hints! – and ALL the answers are there in upper case within the curly brackets without having to “hover”. Is it just me? No-one else has commented on this? Very odd??
    I enjoyed this one but found the top half more difficult than the bottom – hence the need of hints! for which thank you Gazza but, like I say, the answers are there for all to see – at least, they are on my monitor.

    • gazza
      Posted October 19, 2012 at 6:03 pm | Permalink

      Addicted,
      The answers are hidden on most modern browsers. Which browser and which version are you using?

    • Posted October 19, 2012 at 6:03 pm | Permalink

      It was an experiment of mine that failed because Internet Explorer 8 is a pile of cr*p.

      • Addicted
        Posted October 19, 2012 at 8:18 pm | Permalink

        Complete technophobe, I’m afraid. Al I know is that I have a very up-market Vaio – have been using this blog for about 3 years and this is the first time this has happened – so, I will accept Big Dave’s explanation (??) and hope it doesn’t happen again!