DT 26264

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 26264

Hints and tips by Gazza

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BD Rating – Difficulty ***Enjoyment ***

I took longer than I should have to do this puzzle by Giovanni (partly explained by my putting in the wrong answer for 5a) because in retrospect I don’t think that it’s one of his more difficult ones. What’s your opinion? Leave us a comment and please remember to vote by clicking on one of the stars at the bottom.
As always, the answers are hidden between the brackets under the clues. Just highlight the space between the brackets to reveal them.

Across Clues

1a  A party left-winger is loved (6)
{ADORED} – we start with a simple three-part charade to get a synonym for loved.

5a  Gas exhibition in TV programme (4,4)
{CHAT SHOW} – I confidently wrote in “talk show” here, which gave me problems later on. The first word in this charade is indeed a verb meaning to make conversation (gas) but it’s not “talk”.

9a  Bird soared and guns fired (4,6)
{SAND GROUSE} – an anagram (fired, presumably in the sense of stimulated) of SOARED and GUNS produces a ground-dwelling bird.

10a  What could be bread bowl (4)
{ROLL} – double definition, the second being a verb meaning to trundle along. I’m not sure why the clue isn’t just “bread bowl” – probably to signify that some of these are made of, or contain, other foodstuffs.

11a  Essential in this place — set of holy books (8)
{INHERENT} – an adjective meaning permanent or essential is a charade of IN, where “this place” is and the abbreviation for the books in the second half of the Bible.

12a  Friend getting married turning back? Flap! (6)
{DEWLAP} – an amusing picture of the panic brought on by a change of mind. The definition is a flap of loose skin hanging from the neck or throat, and to get it string together a synonym for friend and another word for married and then reverse the lot (turning back).

13a  Drug to make one calm with place briefly drifting away (4)
{ACID} – start with an adjective meaning calm or serene and remove (drifting away) the PL (place briefly) from its beginning.

15a  Guarded about money, holding it back (8)
{RETICENT} – an adjective meaning guarded or reluctant to say too much is constructed from a short word meaning about and a coin (money) with IT reversed (back) inside.

18a  Compiler in extremis: Paper boss, I want my money! (8)
{CREDITOR} – this sounds like a cri de coeur from Giovanni. I wonder if the Telegraph is a bit slow to settle up? Start with the outer letters (in extremis) of CompileR and add the boss of the paper to get someone to whom money is owed.

19a  Tolerable journey back for two seamen (2-2)
{SO-SO} – two ordinary seamen are reversed (journey back) to get an adjective meaning tolerable.

21a  Plant support fixed to side of post (6)
{TEASEL} – the support that an artist may use comes after (fixed to) one of the side letters of posT to get a tall prickly plant.

23a  Most cordial friends in gym training? (8)
{PALLIEST} – the definition is most cordial. Put a synonym for friends or supporters inside the abbreviation for physical training.

25a  Some idiots ignore meaningful gesture (4)
{SIGN} – hidden (some) in the clue is a meaningful gesture (or an honest admission!).

26a  Not immune from attack making a journey by sea in the black (10)
{ASSAILABLE} – an adjective meaning capable of being attacked is made from A and then a sea journey (by yacht rather than steamer) inside a heraldic term for black.

27a  Cheese has me spinning round — ridiculous! (8)
{EMMENTAL} – a holey Swiss cheese starts with a reversal (spinning round) of ME which is followed by a slang term meaning crazy or ridiculous.

28a  Going around far side of Norwich arrive at closed community (6)
{GHETTO} – put a phrasal verb meaning to arrive at around the end (far side) of NorwicH to get a part of a city which is occupied exclusively by one racial group (closed community).

Down Clues

2d  Tense, like e.g. a goalless match (5)
{DRAWN} – double definition – an adjective meaning strained or tense is also a description of a match which finishes 0-0 (or 1-1).

3d  Like a scarlet woman, maybe, but not blonde (3-6)
{RED-HEADED} – I’m not convinced that this one works terribly well. A description of a woman who is not blonde (or brunette) can also mean angrily excited or flushed (scarlet) with anger.

4d  Man submerged under Devon river moved quickly (6)
{DARTED} – an abbreviated man’s name (as used by 40% of the candidates in the Labour Party leadership election) comes after (submerged under, in a down clue) a very picturesque Devon river to get a verb meaning moved quickly.

5d  One corporal puts out alternative suggestion (7-8)
{COUNTER-PROPOSAL} – an anagram (out) of ONE CORPORAL PUTS produces an alternative suggestion.

6d  A short letter about church upset with dean’s original story (8)
{ANECDOTE} – the definition is story. Put A and a short letter around the abbreviation for Church of England which is reversed (upset) and the initial letter (original) of Dean.

7d  Payment for prison warder (5)
{SCREW} – double definition of a word with two (at least) slang usages. It means what you earn for working (payment) and also a prison officer.

8d  Ring — it’s transformed with plain colours (3,6)
{OIL PAINTS} – start with O (ring) and follow with an anagram (transformed) of  IT’S and PLAIN to get colours.

14d  Deem Capri fantastic and enjoy the moment (5,4)
{CARPE DIEM} – an anagram (fantastic) of DEEM CAPRI is a latin phrase which literally means “seize the day”.

16d  Criticise pitch with which you get one wicket? (9)
{CASTIGATE} – forget cricket – start with a verb meaning to pitch or throw and add I and a small opening (often inset in a bigger one for pedestrian access) to make a verb meaning to criticise.

17d  Reliable sort, breaker of law in the beginning (8)
{STALWART} – put an anagram (breaker) of LAW inside a synonym for beginning.

20d  Brief affair — little yen to get involved (6)
{FLYING} – an informal word for a temporary relationship (affair) has Y(en) (little yen) put inside (involved) to make an adjective meaning brief (like a Prime Ministerial visit to Afghanistan).

22d  Performer not right — no evidence of great fire (5)
{SINGE} – remove the final R (not right) from a performer to get a slight scorch mark, much less than you’d get from a great fire.

24d  Wreck in European port (5)
{SPLIT} – double definition, the second being a Croatian port and resort on the Adriatic.

The clues I liked today included 12a, 15a, 5d and 20d, but my favourite is 18a. Let us know your views in a comment!

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23 Comments

  1. mary
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    Morning Gazza, when I looked at this at first I could only do one 25a! then it slowly came together with the bottom r/h corner being the last to complete, I liked 18a but on discussion with my brother later on, he didn’t like the fact that the whole word editor was used? other than that I didn’t have a real favourite today, nice to finish it early on, without the blog, but always good to read the explainations to see if i get them right, i am still frequently working ‘backwards’ :)

    • Barrie
      Posted June 11, 2010 at 6:21 pm | Permalink

      Hi Mary, good to see you back refreshed after your break. I too struggled a bit with todays and was REALLY DISAPPOINTED that 16d had nothing to do with cricket.! I was looking forward to solving a nice cricketing clue only to discover is was a fraud. BAH!!

  2. Posted June 11, 2010 at 11:12 am | Permalink

    18a for me too – what a lovely clue. I found the rest pretty straightforward with some fun wordplay and misdirection (16d was a very close second favourite, particularly after the England assessment of the Old Trafford wicket last week).
    Thanks for the review, gazza, and thanks to Giovanni.

    • Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:23 pm | Permalink

      Forgot to say thanks for the piccy at 25a and the lovely picture of Rita Hayworth!

  3. Kath
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 11:56 am | Permalink

    I made rather “heavy weather” of this today – partly, I think, because I now EXPECT Fridays to be difficult! 18a – couldn’t get beyond “predator” for ages – don’t know why as it really didn’t fit the clue at all but, having thought of it ….! Nearly gave up on 16d having convinced myself that it had to be something to do with cricket. Always thought that 27a had an “h” in it. Particularly liked 5 and 12a and 14d. Having finally managed to finish it without help from the blog I was slightly disappointed to see that it was only a 3*!

    • Lea
      Posted June 11, 2010 at 1:46 pm | Permalink

      Kath – 27a has two spellings and one of them does have the “h” in it.

  4. David R
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

    A most enjoyable puzzle. It wasn’t jumping out at me to start with but once a few answers were in it all fell in to place. 27A made me chuckle, perhaps relating to the advice not to eat it before going to bed. This may be a stupid question, but how do you know who compiled the crossword?

    • gazza
      Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:10 pm | Permalink

      The Telegraph has a regular weekly pattern, and most setters have left comments on the blog “owning up”.

      • David R
        Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:35 pm | Permalink

        Thank you. You would think I might have spotted that. Hopefully it will enable me to find some older puzzles, by particular compilers, on Clued Up.

  5. Nubian
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:29 pm | Permalink

    Did the same with 5a Gazza otherwise a good Friday puzzle

    • Nubian
      Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

      The new toughie 370 is brilliant

    • Mr Tub
      Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:37 pm | Permalink

      Ditto!

  6. Geoff
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 12:45 pm | Permalink

    Nearly got there, just a few I couldn’t put together, so quite pleased with that.

    Thanks to Gazza, especially for the pc at 25a.

  7. BigBoab
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

    As usual a cracking crossword fro Giovanni, good fun and a mixture of easy and difficult, loved it.
    . Thanks also to Gazza for a great review.

  8. Franny
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 1:47 pm | Permalink

    Enjoyed this puzzle but needed your help for the last five words. Thought teasel was spelt with a ‘z’ and also that the Swiss cheese had an ‘h’ in it — though I see from the photo that it hasn’t. I don’t really understand the explanation for 13a, though I put the right word in anyway (that often happens) and I don’t like clues like 17a where you have to find a synonym as well as an anagram. Will just have to get used to it. Practise, practise!
    My favourite clue was 18a. :-)

    • gazza
      Posted June 11, 2010 at 1:49 pm | Permalink

      Franny
      In 13a calm is “placid”. Take off the PL (place briefly) to leave a slang word for drug.

  9. Lea
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

    I really enjoy Fridays – good puzzle with some excellent clues. I particularly enjoyed 20d as well as 18a.

    Stupidly put pleasant in 23a to start with until I got 16d and had to change it. Not thinking straight but it was first instinct. I do 5d before 5a so avoided the error that Gazza and Nubian made. Only cause I couldn’t think of the answer at first!!!!

    Excellent review Gazza – lovely photos and clips. Thanks for the puzzle Giovanni – so much nicer than yesterday’s horrible offering.

  10. Prolixic
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    Many thanks to Giovanni for today’s crossword. Like many I started with talk show in 5a but fortunately realised the errors of my ways. I’ll add another vote for 18a as the best clue. Many thanks to Giovanni for the crossword and to Gazza for the notes. With this and an Elgar Toughie, it has been a great Friday.

  11. peter
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

    Much as I Like 18a, I can understand why Giovanni’s money might be withheld

  12. Little Dave
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 4:46 pm | Permalink

    Found this rather tough and I missed 28a which I thought was vague. Also 20d weakish. I hope this doesn’t smack of sour grapes!
    Enjoyable otherwise (football-free environment in this part of Hertfordshire).

  13. Barrie
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 6:17 pm | Permalink

    Not my favourite Giovanni but not bad nevertheless. Bit of a learning exercise, never heard of holy books called Herent, the bird in 9a and 21a is totally new to me. Started really well in the top left, faltered a bit bottom left, struggled with top right and was completely baffled by bottom right!! Oh and just what is the heraldic word for black? Still with help I got there in the end even if I did have to resort to the blog for the bottom right. Although Giovannis always have a tough part, he always gives you a way in to encourage you. Ray T please take note!!

    • Posted June 11, 2010 at 6:32 pm | Permalink

      Barrie.

      It’s HERE (this place) + NT (New Testament / Holy books)

      and the heraldic term is SABLE

  14. Pommers
    Posted June 11, 2010 at 9:14 pm | Permalink

    Thanks Giovanni and thanks Gazza! really enjoyed today. Took me a while to get into it and “dewlap” for some reason caused difficulty! Otherwise a very enjoyable test.