DT 28732

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 28732

Hints and tips by a merry Miffypops

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BD Rating – Difficulty **Enjoyment ***

It is Monday. Day four of our busiest weekend of the year where the heart of Downtown LI beats harder and faster than normal. Thanks to Weekendwanda for visiting yesterday. I hope you liked our quiet and peaceful meditation garden. Today’s puzzle is by Dada and as usual for a Monday is of a very high standard indeed. Lots to amuse and bewilder. I hope you enjoyed it too.

Below are some hints and tips. I hope they help.

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought.

Across

7a Man resting, cleric (8)
CHAPLAIN: Begin with a four-lettered synonym for a man, bloke, or geezer. Add the past participle of the word lie (as in lie down for a rest, not tell falsehoods).

9a Place for shopping channel (6)
OUTLET: A double definition both clearly defined as nouns in my online dictionary One a pipe or hole through which water or gas may escape and the other a point from which goods are sold or distributed. Both best avoided in my opinion

10a Current business, weak (6)
INFIRM: Start with a synonym for the word current used before the words vogue and fashion. Add another word for business.

11a Single file, we abandoned ship (8)
WIFELESS: This state of lonely nirvana can be found by solving an anagram (abandoned) of FILE WE and adding the term for a steamship.

12a Fearing hell, art extraordinarily exaggerated (6,4,4)
LARGER THAN LIFE: Anagram (extraordinary) of RAT FEARING HELL or as it says in the clue FEARING HELL ART

15a Minor irritation — problem scratching head? (4)
ITCH: First find a noun meaning a temporary difficulty or problem. Remove its first letter (scratching head)

17a Found in bistro, a stupendous cook (5)
ROAST: A lurker. Hiding amongst the words of the clue and indicated by the words found in

19a A, B, C or D, say — but ___? (4)
NOTE: Split 3,1 the answer tells you that you do not have the next letter in the series. As the definition is already underlined I cannot underline the definition.

20a ‘Oath’, for example — is this? (4-6,4)
FOUR-LETTER WORD: A cryptic definition of the word OATH and also what an oath might be when used as a profanity. Sadly, these words are used far too often and are always inappropriate

23a Oddly, each still more than delighted (8)
ECSTATIC: Begin with the odd numbered letters of the word each. Add a word meaning still.

25a Soft, small and smelly (6)
SPONGY: Use the abbreviation for small. Add a word meaning smelly. This clue and answer made me laugh

27a Bread snack is near bananas (6)
SARNIE: I do like a bit of food in a crossword and in a Tom Waits song. We have some here. Cheese and pickle, ham and mustard, prawns and mayonnaise, salmon and cucumber. Roll on summer. Anagram (bananas) of IS NEAR

28a Success with different tiles where red or white chosen? (4,4)
WINE LIST: A nice drop of ice cold Chablis will go well with the foodstuff above. Anagram (different) of TILES follows a synonym of the word success

Down

1d Nation short of a feature (4)
CHIN: Begin with a nation that ends with the letter a and remove that self-same letter. You will be left with a facial feature reminiscent of the late great Jimmy Hill

2d Twig about new time for rejuvenation (6)
SPRING: Take a small stem bearing leaves or flowers, taken from a plant and place it around the abbreviation for the word new.

3d Something for winter ending in Christmas present (4)
SNOW: Take the last letter of the word Christmas and add a word meaning present as in the present time

4d Refuse collector going around on holiday with genius (6)
BOFFIN: What you place your rubbish in goes around a term meaning on holiday. On is often used in Crosswordland to mean working. This is the opposite.

5d Horse stoppin’ to eat oats, primarily (8)
STALLION: Note that the word stopping in the clue is without its last letter. Find a word that means stopping such as an engine might if it cuts out. Remove its last letter to match the clue. Wrap it around the first (primary) letter of the word oats

6d Communication network’s opening line adopted by confused tweeters (10)
NEWSLETTER: The eight words in this clue give us a lot to do. Begin with the first (opening) letter of the word network. Add an anagram (confused) of TWEETERS. Throw in the abbreviation for the word line. Although this clue is only eight words long it surely holds the record for the most letters in an eight-word clue

8d Fan has a damp area bandaged by doctor (7)
ADMIRER: Use the letter A from the clue. Now wrap the abbreviation for doctor around a word meaning a damp area, a stretch of swampy or boggy ground.

I had a little Pony
His name was Dapple Grey
I lent him to a lady
She rode him far away
She whipped him and she lashed him
She rode him through the mire
I wouldn’t lend my pony now
For all the lady’s hire

13d Mock trial, if CIA involved (10)
ARTIFICIAL: Anagram (involved) of TRIAL IF CIA. I once employed a chap who had a false leg and a real foot. Honestly. Really. It is a fact. He had a false leg and a real foot.

14d Middle card (5)
HEART: The centre of something or one of the four suits of playing cards.

16d Evocative, searching around area (8)
HAUNTING: Place a synonym of the word searching around the abbreviation of the word area

18d Ultimately abhorrent motive for crime (7)
TREASON: Begin with the final letter (ultimately) of the word abhorrent. Add a synonym of the word motive

21d Rubbish brood (6)
LITTER: A double definition, the second being a scourge on our modern society and the second being a group of animals born during the same confinement

22d Totally sacred, did you say? (6)
WHOLLY: A homophone based upon a synonym of the word sacred, indicated by the words did you say

24d Lower, large hood (4)
COWL: The lower here is a beast of the field that produces milk. Add to this beast the abbreviation for large

26d Cut oxygen, perhaps, then hydrogen (4)
GASH: Begin with what oxygen is. Add the chemical symbol for hydrogen

A man must break his back to earn his day of leisure

Quickie Pun. Muzzle+Toff=Mazel Tov. Congratulations; good luck.

47 responses to “DT 28732

  1. Finished easily enough, but there were a few I didn’t like. Is 27a a real word? And the word for smelly in 25a? I couldn’t parse 15a and felt that 20a was a bit of a cop out.

    Perhaps I am just being a bit of a curmudgeon because I haven’t slept well.

    Thanks to Dada and MP.

  2. 2.5* / 3*. Another light but enjoyable Monday puzzle with the NE corner taking as long as the other three sectors together. 11a was my last one in and favourite.

    With my pedant’s hat on, shouldn’t 28a say “whence” not “where”?

    Many thanks to Dada and to MMP.

  3. An enjoyable and not too demanding start to the work week completed at a gallop – **/***.

    There did seem to be a sprinkling of oldies but goodies/recent repeats – 19a, 20a, and 26d for example.

    Favourite – 5d.

    Thanks to Dada and GMoLI.

  4. Good start to the week although I have an aversion to the word at 27a.

    No particular favourite but 20a raised a smile.

    Thanks to Dada and to MP – the ability Joan Baez has to slide effortlessly up and down the scale always amazes me.

    • Joan Baez’s ability to slide up and down is possibly something to which Bob Dylan can attest :wink:

      P.S. I agree with you about 27a. Awful word.

      • I couldn’t possibly comment – but listening to their duet on Blowin’ in the Wind almost persuaded me that he can sing in tune if given the right lead!

  5. No problem (as they say!) with today’s assignment which was solved lickety split. I slept OK but I still agree with all MalcolmR’s comments whilst noting Senf’s comment. The Quickie also has one or two argot words. 19a was unparsed by me. Liked 22d although it is doubtless a chestnut. Thank you Dada and MP.

  6. I can do no better than echo RD’s first sentence.

    Favourite for me was also 11a, with 19a and 6d not far behind.

    Many thanks to Mr Halpern and the merry one.

  7. Hi – been doing this crossword for a while (years!) – getting better, but this website is great – helps a lot, and love to read the comments! – how about starting a ‘how long it took to finish race? – without any looking up spelling or definition tricks of course?

    • Welcome to the blog

      One of the basic, and probably most important, conventions used on this site is that solving times are never mentioned for fear of discouraging those who take longer than others to enjoy the solving process

      • Sorry – I am new to this, and only meant ‘a but of fun’ – I would NEVER wish to either show off (I’m not that good!) or discourage other people – please forgive me, my first post seems to have been a bit of a wet squib – will try harder next time!

        • Don’t be disheartened, Mike, we all learn by putting our foot in it. Several years down the line, I still get hauled over the coals on occasions – usually deservedly so! ‘Rules is rules’ and their existence probably contributes a great deal to the success of this site. Nice to welcome a new face to the family.

  8. A mix of the old friend and the ‘what is he on about now?’ was how I found this back pager.

    Thanks to Dada for the crossword and the hard-working MP for the hints

  9. Okay – should have read the etiquette – sorry again about the ‘NEVER’ I was not shouting, only trying to emphasise my sincerity.

  10. I’m afraid I am just not on this setter’s wavelength yet. I have hopes that I will be some day, but it’s looking like that day will be some time away.

    Needed 6 hints today which is really not good .

    Thanks to the setter and big thanks to Miffypops.

  11. Finished in good time (for me), I hate the word ‘sarnie’ almost as as I do ‘you guys’.

  12. Great BH puzzle, good fun from start to finish. Just the right amount of head scratching perfectly pitched for today not being too time consuming. Last in 6d. Lots to like about this puzzle. More on Dadda’s radar today.

    Clues of the day: Really liked 20a.

    Rating: *** / ****

    Thanks to MP and Dadda.

  13. Nice puzzle. Agree with MP’s **/*** rating. 11a was my favourite clue. Many thanks to the setter and to Miffy Pops.

    PS. I trust no pen and paper was used for any of the anagrams 😳

  14. Typing error, I meant I hate the expression ‘you guys’ as well as sarnie.

  15. I seem to remember having a problem with Dada before, but I must be getting better as was right on wavelength today, until I got to the NE corner. I put a wrong answer in 5d and 11a and made a total cockup of it. I’m so cross with myself I can barely finish this comment. Serve me jolly well right.
    Fave was 20a but lots to like.
    Thanks to Dada and M’pops. Love the Joan Baez.

  16. East Anglia, and my garden, is baking to a crisp. That rhyme used to upset me as a child. Poor Dapple Grey. A thoroughly enjoyable puzzle, although I needed help with NE corner so thanks to Miffypops.

    • How about another of my favourites?

      I had a little nut tree
      Nothing would it bear
      But a silver nutmeg
      And a golden pear

      The king Of Spain’s Daughter
      Came to visit me
      And all for the sake of
      My little nut tree.

      I Danced over oceans
      I danced over sea
      And all the birds in the air
      Couldn’t catch me.

  17. A nicely pitched crossword for the Bank Holiday. Most enjoyable. 27a is a rather unpleasant word but is surely quite acceptable. 20a has to be my favourite.
    Thanks to Dada, and to MP for the review.

  18. are baking, that should have been. The heat must be getting to me. Or the barbecue fumes.

  19. Found this a little tricky for a Monday ***/*** 😳 Favourites 4d & 2d Thanks to Miffypops and to Dada 😊

  20. A beautiful sunny day spent with the family prevented me from having a go at this, but thanks to MP for an amusing set of hints.

  21. I thought I was in trouble when my first one in was 15ac, but the bottom half of the grid filled rapidly after that, and I had more luck with the downs in the top half. Finished in * time at the close, so all in all a straightforward and enjoyable start to the week after that initial scare!

  22. I wonder if the hint for 11a is part of one of those word association test.
    Have to refer to my shrink.
    Hope that nothing is boiling up in MP’s household. So easy to slam the door or have it slammed on you. Happened to me a few times. Quite an expensive habit in fact but can’t really say that I reached nirvana.
    Solved today’s dada on the trot from the bottom up.
    Very enjoyable ride.
    Thanks to the setter and to MP for the review.

  23. 27a is on my “Words I never use” list along with howlers like ‘Pants’, ‘Uni’ and a couple more.

    Not forgetting the overuse of the exclamation mark, of course.

  24. Love that there’s a blog for people who get exercised over a grating short form of Earl Sandwich’s snack. Not to mention ‘whence’. I feel I belong.

  25. Far too late to comment but here I am anyway.
    I solved this one early evening time in the garden with a glass of wine in the delightful company of our Elder Lamb and her partner who have been here for a few days with our grandson.
    What a hot day it’s been – at the risk of sounding like a grumpy old moo it’s too hot – the garden’s frizzled and so am I.
    I found it quite tricky but I’m SO out of routine at the moment that that is my excuse for today.
    Got there in the end.
    12 and 20a were the two answers that stood out for me.
    With thanks to Dada and to our merry MP.

  26. Seems I was perfectly attuned to the required wavelength as this all went in swiftly. A nice way to round off a very enjoyable day with all our children and parents visiting for a family lunch in the bank holiday sunshine.
    Thanks to Dada for the late evening entertainment and Miffypops for the review.

  27. A nice puzzle to get me back in the swing of things. Thank you Dada and merry Miffypops.

  28. Didn’t have time yesterday, but solved it fairly rapidly this morning. Like some others, only the NE corner provided a bit of a challenge. **/****. Very enjoyable. I’m not fussed by the occasional use of slang, so 27a didn’t offend me at all. 11a was my favourite. Now for today’s.

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