DT 27188

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 27188

Hints and tips by Libellule

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty * Enjoyment ****

Hmm, the sun is shining, and maybe spring has finally arrived, and I can start to think about putting the tomatoes out. An enjoyable but not overly complicated crossword from the maestro today.

Across

1. Circulates counterfeit US money, but shifts responsibility (6,3,4)
{PASSES THE BUCK} – A phrase that means to give the blame to someone else, could also describe handing out false dollars.

10. Hit century, made fast (7)
{CLOCKED} – A word that describes striking someone on the face or head, is C (100), followed by another word for being shut or secured.

11. Man taking in some tennis, returning kind of cross (7)
{MALTESE} – Another term for a man or a boy is placed around a reversed (returning) three for women, and five for men typically in tennis. Definition is “kind of cross”.

12. Order a gin for Swedish girl? (4)
{INGA} – An anagram (order) of A GIN.

13. A charming French accent (5)
{ACUTE} – A and a word that means pretty or dainty produces a diacritical mark used in some languages.

14. Sneer? I beg to differ! (4)
{GIBE} – An anagram (to differ) of I BEG.

17. Appeared to act? (7)
{ENTERED} – Like walking onto a stage.

18. Minister provides framework for a nuclear establishment (7)
{REACTOR} – A cleric in charge of a parish is placed around A to get a place where a chain reaction is sustained and controlled.

19. Eastern politician, Queen or ruler (7)
{EMPEROR} – E (Eastern), a two letter abbreviation for a Member of Parliament, Her Majesty, and then finally OR.

22. Fear led to riot concerning central government (7)
{FEDERAL} – An anagram (to riot) of FEAR LED.

24. Look in half a dozen directions (4)
{VIEW} – VI (half a dozen), plus E (East) and W (West).

25. Placing of the winner may create rifts (5)
{FIRST} – An anagram (may create) of RIFTS.

26. It may be used to lift a football side (4)
{WING} – An organ or structure used for flying, is also the left or right side of a football pitch.

29. I keep going round part of Spain (7)
{CASTILE} – Put another word for a stronghold around I, to get a region and former kingdom of central and northern Spain.

30. Pardons and releases (7)
{EXCUSES} – To forgive, or to give permission to leave.

31. Could be a circular plug (13)
{ADVERTISEMENT} – Nope, not a French electrical connector, but a paid announcement or public notice.

Down

2. In the midst of anxiety, a case for doctor (7)
{AMONGST} – Put MO inside a word that describes a feeling of anxiety or apprehension.

3. Asian to look for, by the sound of it (4)
{SIKH} – This Indian sounds like SEEK.

4. Deduces it is wrong to be led astray (7)
{SEDUCED} – An anagram (it is wrong) of DEDUCES.

5. Pet’s held in arms — the stray (7)
{HAMSTER} – An anagram (stray) of ARMS THE.

6. Run away from a flash of lightning (4)
{BOLT} – Double definition, to start suddenly and run away, or a streak of lightening.

7. One needs a regular supply of drugs to keep going (7)
{CHEMIST} – Another word for a pharmacist.

8. Soldiers may see it as a moving religious ceremony (6,7)
{ACTIVE SERVICE} – A term that describes military duty in an operational area, can be made up from a word that means being in physical motion, followed by another word for a religious rite.

9. No doubt one’s aware of the pressure we’re under (13)
{METEOROLOGIST} – Someone who studies and forecasts weather conditions.

15. Tour arranged around mid-April somewhere in Cornwall (5)
{TRURO} – An anagram (arranged) of TOUR around the middle letter (R) of April.

16. They work around the clock (5)
{HANDS} – They would, if you had an analogue watch…

20. Happy and relaxed after record rise (7)
{PLEASED} – Reverse two letters for a type of gramophone record, and then add another word for the condition of being comfortable, to get a word that means to be satisfied or contented.

21. Object when going into rent is investment (7)
{RAIMENT} – Another word for clothing can also be constructed from a word that means for a purpose or intention that is then placed inside (going into) RENT.

22. FA’s receiving nets to mount ties (7)
{FASTENS} – Place a reversed (to mount) NETS inside FAS.

23. Sinner I reformed pulls up, perhaps (5,2)
{REINS IN} – An anagram (reformed) of SINNER I.

27. It may be sucked or blown (4)
{PIPE} – Because it can be smoked or played.

28. Rogue quietly abandoned swindle (4)
{SCAM} – Take a word for a rascal, drop the final letter P, to get a word for a fraudulent scheme.


The Quick crossword pun: (reign} + {cheque} = {raincheck}

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42 Comments

  1. Brian
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:09 am | Permalink

    A real puzzle of two halves. The right hand side was lovely, the left was very tricky. So for me a two star but still very enjoyable.
    Don’t see why 21d is an article of clothing, what has investment to do with raiment?
    The key for me was 8d, once in it all fell nicely into place but took me ages to see the answer.
    Thx to the setter and to Libellule for the help with seeing 8d.

    • Rabbit Dave
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:23 am | Permalink

      **/*** for me.

      I’m exactly on your wavelength on this one Brian. I put Senior Service for 8d which completely messed up the NW corner for me, and like you I didn’t realise that investment could mean clothing.

      After a week’s holiday in glorious sun on the Red Sea, I was suffering from crossword withdrawal symptoms and this was a great way to get started again!

      Many thanks to the setter and to Libellule for the review and for putting me straight on 8d, and explaining 21d.

      • BigBoab
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:47 am | Permalink

        Members of the Senior Service are sailors not soldiers I believe.

    • crypticsue
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 11:10 am | Permalink

      Without seeming to be boringly repetitive, a trip to the dictionary tells you that investment is an archaic term for clothes as is raiment. Wonderful things, dictionaries.

      • Steve_the_beard
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:37 pm | Permalink

        :-)

      • Brian
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

        Not in my copy of Chambers which lists investment as the action of assuming clothing not a piece of clothing or apparel despite the sarcy comment.

        • Posted May 27, 2013 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

          To be totally fair a) it is in Chambers (12th edition) but b) it does say that it is only when in the plural, i.e. investments.

          Full entry:

          investment (noun)
          * The act of investing
          * Investiture
          * Any placing of money to secure income or profit
          * That in which money is invested
          * A blockade (military)
          * (in plural) clothes (archaic)

        • Collywobbles
          Posted May 27, 2013 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

          The clue for 21d, IMHO, is rubbish, whatever we say about it. It’s abstruse. Now look that up in Chambers

          • Posted May 27, 2013 at 6:02 pm | Permalink

            Is abstruse abstruse?

            • Collywobbles
              Posted May 28, 2013 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

              Oui

    • Roger
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 11:13 am | Permalink

      I’m with you on this one. Lots of holes for me in the lh half and for once the BRB didn’t really yield much in the way of assistance.

      Senior Service is the Royal Navy.

      • Rabbit Dave
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

        Indeed it is. And I knew that, which made my answer even more stupid :-(

    • Silveroak
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 2:53 pm | Permalink

      I thought 21d was aim (object) inside rent

      • Posted May 27, 2013 at 2:56 pm | Permalink

        It is – but the definition is investment, and this is what is being called into question.

  2. Only fools
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:16 am | Permalink

    Pleasure from start to finish .Favourite 9d but lots of others .
    Off to a country antiques fair ,should blend in well.
    Thanks very much .

  3. Sweet William
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:48 am | Permalink

    Thank you Rufus if it was you – one or two tricky ones eg 29a. – but enjoyable sitting in the sun – which has now disappeared – rain forecast. Hope it doesn’e hold up the cricket. Thank you Libellule for your review. I think Spring must have arrived – we have birds feeding their young in our garden, but it is not very warm !

    • Lord Luvvaduck
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 11:02 am | Permalink

      ‘Spring must have arrived’. But according to 9d summer starts on Saturday, so I think we have been swindled by the gods of the weather. Thanks to Libellule and the setter.

  4. BigBoab
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:48 am | Permalink

    Many thanks to Rufus for a very enjoyable and gentle start to the crossword week and to Libellule for the usual masterly review.

  5. 2Kiwis
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 11:34 am | Permalink

    Just to be different, we started off with “action station” for 8d. Seemed to fit, with the stations of the cross being a moving religious ceremony. Didn’t do much for the cross-checkers though. So this held us up for a bit. However the biggest hold-up was with 9d. Even with all the checking letters except the G from wing, we still could not see the answer until we did what we call cheating, and used electronic help. Hardest Monday workout that we have had for a very long time. All good fun.
    Thanks Rufus and Libellule.

  6. Kath
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:01 pm | Permalink

    For me this was in between 1 and 2* for difficulty and nearly 4* for enjoyment.
    I whizzed through most of it then came to a grinding halt with 27a and 8, 9 and 27d – got there in the end.
    I thought that ‘buck’ was slang for a dollar rather than counterfeit money.
    Lots of good clues – 24 and 29a and 6, 9 (eventually) and 27 (again, eventually) down.
    With thanks to Rufus and Libellule.
    Not sure about this summer business – a really cold wind here today although, at the moment, the sun is out. Forecast for the rest of the week is rubbish – need to cut grass – might be the last chance I get for a while.

    • SheilaP
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

      I may be wrong but perhaps the ‘ passes’ is the counterfeit bit of the clue.

      • Kath
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 2:29 pm | Permalink

        I thought that ‘passes’ was circulates – never mind, and thanks anyway. :smile:
        I’m really not nit-picking here – just saying what I thought.

      • Kath
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:06 pm | Permalink

        Going back to yesterday because I’ve only just read the later comments (and assuming that I’m not going to be drummed out of the boy scouts, or whatever the expression is, for talking wrong comment on wrong blog AND wrong day) I’m not sure that I can explain 27a without being sent, retrospectively, to the naughty corner. The second word of 27a is the name of a very regular commenter, or commentator, or whatever, who isn’t around for a few days or so – I just thought it was a pity because she would have loved it.

        • SheilaP
          Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:27 pm | Permalink

          Hi Kath,…don’t worry about naughty corners or anything like that, I think it’s quite nice to be a little bit naughty sometimes don’t you, especially when big Dave gets a bit annoyed. Oh dear, perhaps it’s me for the naughty corner now.

  7. Michael
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

    To be pedantic, a game of tennis consists of 5 (men) or 3 (women) of the things in 11a.

    • Rabbit Dave
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

      I think a set can reasonably be described as “some tennis”

      • Michael
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:54 pm | Permalink

        Yes, but there are not 6 in a match.

        • Libellule
          Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:59 pm | Permalink

          I need to correct that – “traditionally, matches are either a best of three sets or best of five sets format. The best of five set format is typically only played in the Men’s singles”, in my hurry this morning to get the blog out I have mixed games with sets. Apologies.

  8. Derek
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 12:31 pm | Permalink

    The usual pleasant puzzle from Rufus – a steady solve.

    Faves : 11a, 18a, 29a, 8d, 9d & 21d.

    Sunny but still on the cool side!

  9. SheilaP
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 1:46 pm | Permalink

    Nice crossword for us today….managed most of it without help, very unusual. Thank you to setter & hinter.

  10. Michael
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 2:13 pm | Permalink

    A really nice puzzle – not too taxing for a Bank Holiday Monday.

    Spoilt for choice this afternoon – do I sit in the garden I’ve been attacking all morning OR do I watch the Footie OR do I watch the Cricket?

    Decisions, decisions – I’ll probably fall asleep like I normally do!

  11. Little Dave
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Zipped through in super fast time last 3 in being 9d (doh!),27d (doh!) and 26a (doh!).

    • Kath
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 6:28 pm | Permalink

      My last three too.

  12. bestman
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 5:10 pm | Permalink

    Though 10a was BATONED as in bat and ton and to make fast, but i never could spell

  13. una
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 5:33 pm | Permalink

    I think Rufus was in cracking form when he composed this.Most went in very quickly, although 8d took me ages.I got 31a from the checkers but not from the clue. Thanks Rufus and Libellule. 7d was a lovely clue.

  14. Merusa
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 6:15 pm | Permalink

    I loved this, not just because it was easy, but the clues were clever. Thanks to all

  15. pommers
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 8:19 pm | Permalink

    Clever, enjoyable and a lot easier than the Rufus offering in today’s Grauniad. Thanks very much to the Monday Maestro and also to Libellule. Now for the Dante (Rufus) in today’s FT – he’s been a busy chappie :smile:

    • 2Kiwis
      Posted May 27, 2013 at 8:38 pm | Permalink

      Hi Pommers, good to hear from you. We actually made such a shambles of this one, that we found the Grauniad offering took slightly less time. Fun though.
      Cheers.

      • pommers
        Posted May 27, 2013 at 9:10 pm | Permalink

        Have to say that pommette did most of this one on her own while I was munching my BLT for lunch. Then we had an afternoon playing something that was a little bit like Bridge but clearly not that skillful!
        Grauniad Rufus before dinner and it seemed to me to be a better puzzle but, in places, a little trickier than usual for Rufus. Perhaps just me with worn out brain from the sort-of bridge!
        Haven’t got round to the Dante yet – sidetracked by phone from aged parent.

        BTW, the Quiptic in the Grauniad is well worth a look.

        • Merusa
          Posted May 27, 2013 at 11:26 pm | Permalink

          We used to call it kitchen bridge. Know it well!!

  16. Heno
    Posted May 27, 2013 at 10:53 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to Rufus and Libellule for the review and hints. A nice cheery puzzle to start the week. Made it hard for myself by getting the wrong name for 12a, then managed to correct it, which gave me 8d. Also didn’t read 3d properly and put seek in, which stopped me getting the last clue 10a. Was 2*/4* for me. Favourites were 1&29a. Late blogging due to a trip to Eastbourne to enjoy the sunshine.