DT 27123

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 27123

Hints and tips by Deep Threat

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty **Enjoyment ***

Good morning from South Staffs where it’s bitterly cold, with a dusting of snow on the ground.

I found this a straightforward puzzle, the bottom half causing perhaps a little more thought than the top.

In the hints below definitions are underlined.

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought.  You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.

Across

1a           Flee, pocketing diamonds after a mischievous adventure (8)
{ ESCAPADE } A verb meaning to flee, with A (from the clue) and the abbreviation for the diamond suit inside it.

5a           Army chaplain having no right on board in a suit (6)
{ SPADES } One of the four suits in a standard pack of cards comes from  removing the R (no right) from a term for an army chaplain, and putting the result on board – that is, inside the usual crossword ship.

10a         Doctor bored with antisocial drug (8,7)
{ ANABOLIC STEROID } Anagram (doctor) of BORED and ANTISOCIAL.

11a         Member must have pluck to suggest a practical joke (3-4)
{ LEG-PULL } One of the members of the body followed by a verb meaning pluck or draw.

12a         Unknown number fired from outside, non-stop (7)
{ ETERNAL } Take an adjective meaning outside and remove (fired from) an algebraic unknown.

13a         Disastrous failure by the enemy to find explosive device (4,4)
{ TIME BOMB } The abstract concept figuratively described as the enemy of humanity, followed by a failure, especially in the theatre.

15a         Condescend to draw missing son (5)
{ DEIGN } Remove the Son from a verb meaning to draw.

18a         Permit inexperienced leader to leave (5)
{ ALLOW } Remove the first letter (leader) of an adjective meaning inexperienced.

20a         Sense agreement amongst rowing crew (8)
{ EYESIGHT } One of the five senses.  A word signifying agreement inside a rowing crew of the sort which contests the Boat Race.

23a         Designer  calendar? (7)
{ PLANNER } Double definition, the second referring to one of those big calendars often seen on office walls.

25a         Deliver TV without charge (3,4)
{ SET FREE } A term for a television – the device, not the programmes – followed by ‘without charge’.

26a         Suffer in silence if bedridden? (4,2,5,4)
{ TAKE IT LYING DOWN } A cryptic definition, where the position you might adopt if bedridden is described in the answer.

27a         Gen we circulated about a cultural trend (3,3)
{ NEW AGE } Anagram (circulated) of GEN WE and A.

28a         Hears a CD prepared for party game (8)
{ CHARADES } Anagram (prepared) of HEARS A CD.

Down

1d           Make possible arrest breaking Helen’s heart (6)
{ ENABLE } An informal term for arrest inside the middle 3 letters of Helen.

2d           Barbecue — reduced cost to get on stream (9)
{ CHARGRILL } Remove the final E (reduced) from a word meaning cost, and add (on, in a Down clue) a small stream.

3d           Appropriate for parish priest in France (7)
{ PROCURE } The definition is a verb. The Latin pronoun for ‘for’ followed by a French priest (minus the acute accent on the final E).

4d           Bore encountered in train, invariably (5)
{ DRILL } Double definition.

6d           Suppose injured rep needs nurse (7)
{ PRETEND } Anagram (injured) of REP followed by a verb meaning ‘nurse’.

7d           River in NI county in flood (5)
{ DROWN } The usual abbreviation for River inside one of the Six Counties.

8d           Extra little earner, perhaps, for food store during function (8)
{ SIDELINE } The familiar shortening of a food store, especially one selling unusual or foreign food, inside a trigonometric function.

9d           Get together because second badge must be shortened (8)
{ ASSEMBLE } A charade of a word meaning ‘because’, Second, and a synonym of badge with the final M removed (shortened).

14d         Reject past convention (8)
{ OVERRULE } A word meaning past or done with, followed by a convention or principle.

16d         Is golf club entertaining that female novelist? (9)
{ ISHERWOOD } IS (from the clue) and a type of golf club either side of (entertaining) a pronoun meaning ‘that female’.

17d         Monk artist’s introduced (8)
{ RASPUTIN } The usual crossword artist plus the ’S and a verb phrase (3,2) meaning introduced, to produce an early 20th century Russian monk. Cue for a song!

19d         Up, appealing (7)
{ WINNING } Double definition.  The state of being up in a game, and an adjective meaning appealing or charming.

21d         A whole number teeing off close to marker (7)
{ INTEGER } Anagram (off) of TEEING followed by the last letter (close) of markeR.

22d         Wrath perhaps after tax put up in sport (6)
{ TENNIS } The failing of which wrath is an example followed by a term for ‘after tax’.  The whole expression is then reversed (put up, in a Down clue).

24d         Cock-eyed query we raised (5)
{ ASKEW } A verb meaning ‘query’ followed by EW (we raised).

25d         Smart wife is interrupting mum (5)
{ SWISH } An interjection enjoining silence (mum) with Wife and IS (from the clue) inside.


The Quick Crossword pun { SOUP UP }{ HOUR } = { SUPERPOWER }

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60 Comments

  1. Miffypops.
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:07 am | Permalink

    A nice crossword to do on the way to Cheltenham. No problems really. The first bottle of Champagne has gone down well with breakfast in the pub. Hurricane Fly for the big race if Zarkander doesn’t steal it from him. Rock on Ruby and Binocular have a chance too. My money is staying in my pocket, as always

    • stanXYZ
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

      Unfortunately my money is in the Bookie’s satchel after the first race! No Champagne for me! :cry:

  2. graham
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:12 am | Permalink

    I agree with deep threats rating of **/*** no real problems bar 16D haveing never come across this author but worked it out from the word play.A nice set of clues and thanks to DT for the review,its freezing but bright on the south coast and a tad windy both outside and from the dog.

  3. skempie
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:17 am | Permalink

    Held up for a while on 19D – I was busy trying to think of a cricket reference, D’Oh. Quite good fun but no stand out clues for me I’m afraid.

    Flurrying here occasionally, nearly had a bit of settlement, but hen a burst of sunshine took care of that. Wish the sunshine would stay and the flurrys bugger off, its freezing here :cry:

  4. mary
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:25 am | Permalink

    Morning DT, thanks for blog, I needed it to understand 13a but apart from that most were pretty clear and workable today, fav clues 25a and 20a, a two to three star once again today for me, not heard of the author in 16d, bright and sunny here with a few flurries but very cold, think I’ll do some housework, double bonus… keep warm and lose some calories!

    • Ashley Wilkes
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:57 pm | Permalink

      I had PIPEBOMB for 13a Mary….. PIP (failure), E (enemy) BOMB (explosive)

      Fine apart from that

  5. Colmce
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:29 am | Permalink

    Nice puzzle, with no particular problems, a pleasureable saunter.

    Thanks for the review, how I missed anagram in 10a I’ll never know, derived from checking letters.

    Thanks to the setter.

  6. Beaver
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:45 am | Permalink

    Agree with the ratings,looked difficult on first’scan’ but was’nt,did the bottom half first. thanks DT for the entertaining ‘pics’;computor at work won’t allow sound, so will have to wait till i get home to hear Bony M,enjoyable start to the day.Had a rediculous phone text earlier from the RAC saying that if i called them this morning i could have a new battery delivered FREE this afternoon! Ireplied that if i needed a new battery ,they would have heard from me already!

  7. Only fools
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:48 am | Permalink

    Completed this after exercising snow shovel .As you say straightforward and as mentioned author was only real delay .
    Agree with rating
    Thanks very much .

  8. Kath
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:49 am | Permalink

    Fairly quick and straightforward for me today – I agree with the ratings. Having more trouble with the quick crossword.
    For no very clear reasons my last two were 23a and 19d. I missed the anagram in 10a too – don’t know how.
    I liked 11, 13 and 26a and 3, 17 and 24d.
    With thanks to Mr Ron and Deep Threat.
    Still very cold but not quite as bad as yesterday was – no snow here.
    I don’t know what to expect from an Excalibur Toughie but going to have a go – ANYTHING but housework!

    • Jezza
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

      Is that the choice Kath – Excalibur Toughie or housework? :)

      • Kath
        Posted March 12, 2013 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

        Too cold to be outside so no contest really. The Toughie it is!! Here I go . . .

    • skempie
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

      I had a lot of problems with the quickie too, then I managed to get 3D and everything else fell into place.

      • Kath
        Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

        Got 3d (having started off with ‘spectre’ which didn’t help anything) – have still only done about half. Not sure we’re allowed to talk about it here but, since we are, what is 12a – that could help!

        • mary
          Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

          I never do the quickie but you’ve intrigued me today so I’ve just printed it off, here goes :-)

          • mary
            Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

            Well stuck on 2d just don’t know it, it’s amazing how easy it is now to just think in cryptic mode! I found it difficult not to!

            • Kath
              Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:05 pm | Permalink

              2d is often followed by ‘layer’ and may, or may not, have holes in it! I don’t always do the quick one but often get stuck on something stupid.

              • mary
                Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

                Thanks Kath finished now :-)

        • gazza
          Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

          12a Camaraderie

          • Kath
            Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:02 pm | Permalink

            Thank you, gazza. :smile: Was beginning to doubt my ricotta!!

  9. Sweet William
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

    Enjoyable thank you setter and thanks for the review DT. Needed to check the hint for 22d but the inevitable photo sorted that out ! Beautiful summer day here in the grim North !

  10. ChrisH
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    I found this a 3* for difficulty. Struggled to get into it and had to persevere. No contentious clues, so well set.

    I too found the ‘Quickie’ at least as difficult for some strange reason. Must be the cold weather shrinking my skull.

    • Kath
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:04 pm | Permalink

      Have given up on the ‘Quickie’ because it isn’t – well not for me anyway.

  11. Jewel
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

    hee hee, another tennis clue – I don’t look like the illustration for this clue either!! No problem with crossword but needed a few explanations and I still cannot think of the word for inexperienced without the first letter (18a)

    • Kath
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:32 pm | Permalink

      Callow – usually followed by ‘youth’.

      • Jewel
        Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:57 pm | Permalink

        ……. thanks

  12. BigBoab
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:36 pm | Permalink

    Very enjoyable crossword today, my thanks to the setter and to DT for the entertaining review.

  13. SheilaP
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:36 pm | Permalink

    Good puzzle for us today, thanks to setter & hinter. Liked the musical clue, dog joined in with the song right in husband’s ear ….not a good move. Icy but bright here in N. Yorks.

    • Kath
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:24 pm | Permalink

      I like your flowers – if there’s something on the radio that I particularly like (usually something from late 60’s or 70’s) and I start singing with it our collie barks at me. Not sure what that says about my singing!!

  14. OneAcross
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

    Is anyone else having trouble with the DT Puzzles website? I can access it but almost every time I try to submit a puzzle nothing happens and if I try to save I get an error message saying Responder fault – error connecting to server and the whole site freezes. I can’t print either as the crossword comes up with blue squares with questions marks in themIt is not my computer as every thing else is working find. Thank you

    • Steve_the_beard
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:43 pm | Permalink

      Worked fine for me. Which browser/version are you using?

    • mary
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

      No sorry OneAcross, touch wood mine is fine at the moment

    • Deep Threat
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 4:17 pm | Permalink

      I’ve had that problem at times. I find that closing the browser (Firefox) and restarting usually fixes it, at least to the extent of having the site working again. Don’t nencessarily get your completed puzzle back though.

  15. Merusa
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:52 pm | Permalink

    I thought this one a good exercise and managed to complete in good time, but I had problems knowing why the answers. It appears I got them right and, thanks to hinter, found out why. 18a completely foxed me, how on earth did I miss that? Funny how easy they look when you know why! I completely missed the anagram in 10a to begin with. 16d used to be quite fashionable at one time. Hope the snow and cold soon go away. When I lived in UK, I used to think that April was the coldest month of the year as it snowed every April just as you thought spring was here.

    • Heno
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:15 pm | Permalink

      I missed the anagram for 10a too, but luckily guessed the drug, then worked backwards.

  16. Franco
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:54 pm | Permalink

    4d – Bore encountered in train, invariably (5)

    I understand “Bore” but not “train, invariably”. Help, please.

    • mary
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:56 pm | Permalink

      ignore the comma

      • mary
        Posted March 12, 2013 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

        just think of ‘train invariably’ Franco

        • Franco
          Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:14 pm | Permalink

          I’m still thinking … Ermmm ????

          • mary
            Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

            If you train invariably i.e. without change, the same old routine all the time, it becomes a drill? the clue is as DT says double definition, perhaps I’m not explaining very well!

            • Franco
              Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:37 pm | Permalink

              Mary, Many Thanks! I finally understand!

              I always struggle with Double Definitions … especially when the only hint is “Double Definition”.

              • mary
                Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

                :-)

  17. Heno
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to Jay ( I think it was, as there were a lot of missing letter clues ) and to Deep Threat for the review. Very enjoyable, no real problems, agree with 2*/3* rating. Started with 1a, finished with 14d. Favourites were 23a and 3,8,17d, the latter made me laugh out loud. A bit bracing on my morning run in Central London, big wind chill factor (WCF).

    • Kath
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:42 pm | Permalink

      Having looked again I agree about there being lots of missing letters but I thought that Jay was always, and only, Wednesdays. Maybe they’ve all swapped around to fool us! :smile:

      • Heno
        Posted March 12, 2013 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

        Yes, you’re right Kath, I forgot the day. Must be Mr.Ron :-)

  18. Bluebird
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

    Hi there.
    Enjoying the blog and hope to begin commenting…

    • Deep Threat
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

      Welcome to the blog Bluebird.

    • Kath
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 5:16 pm | Permalink

      Go on then – you can’t stop there and leave us all in suspense about what you were going to say! :smile: Lots of very friendly and helpful people here.

      • Posted March 12, 2013 at 6:48 pm | Permalink

        I think this was a spam comment that slipped through the filter.

        • Kath
          Posted March 12, 2013 at 10:03 pm | Permalink

          I don’t really understand but does that mean that I shouldn’t have replied? If so, sorry.

          • Posted March 12, 2013 at 10:11 pm | Permalink

            You weren’t to know. Strangely there is no link to another site, so there is an outside chance it is genuine.

  19. Annidrum
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 4:33 pm | Permalink

    At first read I thought this looked very difficult but once I got going I didn’t find it so. I found this easier than yesterday’s Rufus. I,too missed the anagram in 10a although I had the correct answer & decided that it would be explained to me in the hints. Thanks to DT & Setter.

  20. Brian
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 4:51 pm | Permalink

    Lots of problems with today’s. still don’t see what tennis has to do with tax or wrath and why disastrous in 13a?
    Needed lots of help. For me ***/*.
    Thx to DT for the hints but not much fun today for me.

    • crypticsue
      Posted March 12, 2013 at 5:04 pm | Permalink

      Your pay after tax is ‘net’. wrath is an example of a deadly ‘sin’ Try putting the after tax before the wrath and reversing them.

      in 13a the disastrous goes with the failure – as the second part of the solution can mean a fiasco or flop

      • Brian
        Posted March 12, 2013 at 11:20 pm | Permalink

        Thx Sue, never thought of wrath as a deadly sin but of course it is.
        But being thick here, why is time disastrous? Can see that to bomb is to fail and can see that time is the great enemy but why disastrous. Just don’t get it.

        • Posted March 13, 2013 at 12:41 am | Permalink

          It’s the failure that is disastrous! BOMB (disastrous failure) after TIME (the enemy)

  21. Nigel Baker
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

    Another busy day with a late finish. Thought slightly trickier tha n a ** but on reflection it’s me that is tired. Thanks to all.

  22. una
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 9:43 pm | Permalink

    A pretty nice puzzle on the whole,but I had to do it without any “props” (chambers crossword dictionary), so I convinced there was a novelist called Atherwood, a misrecall of Margaret Attwood.Even though it is well known that Isherwood was gay, I don’t think he should be called a “female” novelist. Thanks to setter and Deep Threat.
    by the way , where is Derek ? gone on a world tour ?

    • Derek
      Posted March 13, 2013 at 9:54 am | Permalink

      Hi Una!

      No I am still at home in NL!
      On Monday, the mechanics came to install a new boiler so I now have hot water in the kitchen and central heating in both halves of my double flat.
      Here as in GB it is still snowing – equinox now eight days away!

      Didn’t do the crossword for a few days but solved Tuesday’s this AM very early.

  23. 2Kiwis
    Posted March 12, 2013 at 10:08 pm | Permalink

    An enjoyable puzzle that fell into place without much of a fight, Solved whilst sitting on the deck looking at the surf breaking on the coral reef and also keeping youngest grandchild (Milly, 2) amused.
    Thanks Mr Ron and DT.