DT 27086

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 27086

Hints and tips by Libellule

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty * Enjoyment ***

Those of you who like anagrams are in for a treat, about a third of this crossword consists of anagrams of one type or another. Otherwise a nice gentle straightforward solve to start the week.

Across

1. Passport — or search warrant? (5,6)
{ENTRY PERMIT} – An official document that allows you to get into a place.

9. The uncertain chairman’s lack of control (9)
{ANARCHISM} – An anagram (the uncertain) of CHAIRMANS.

10. Number three is wrong (5)
{ETHER} – An anagram (wrong) of THREE. Number in this sense is an anaesthetic.

11. Stays will alter a waist (6)
{AWAITS} – An anagram (will alter) of A WAIST.

12. Well brought up, but lacking refinement? (5,3)
{CRUDE OIL} – A cryptic description of unrefined petroleum.

13. Former star played walk-on characters (6)
{EXTRAS} – EX (former) and an anagram (played) of STAR.

15. Can’t serve venison without bottle of wine (8)
{DECANTER} – Place a hoofed ruminant mammal of the family Cervidae around (without) CANT.

18. Greeks and Romans are different for instance (8)
{ANCIENTS} – An anagram (are different) of INSTANCE.

19. Still, it could affect one’s reception (6)
{STATIC} – Double definition, fixed, stationary or random noise.

21. Rate rise for renovating major roads (8)
{ARTERIES} – An anagram (for renovating) of RATE RISE.

23. Glass-paper? (6)
{MIRROR} – A looking glass, or a red top.

26. Front cover (5)
{APRON} – A garment worn over your front used to protect your clothing.

27. Live out on new development (9)
{EVOLUTION} – An anagram (new) of LIVE OUT ON.

28. Expansion of the novel ‘Greenmantle’ (11)
{ENLARGEMENT} – An anagram (the novel) of GREENMANTLE.

Down

1. Issue call-up to rising Greek character (7)
{EMANATE} – The definition is issue, reverse (up) a word that describes that which a person or thing is commonly known, and then reverse (rising) the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet.

2. The Pope’s top gear (5)
{TIARA} – The triple crown worn by the pope.

3. Cathy built career in sporting competition (5,4)
{YACHT RACE} – An anagram (built) of CATHY followed by a word that means to move at high speed, produces the sort of competition you might see on the Solent.

4. It’s bad to be overthrown (4)
{EVIL} – Reverse (overthrown) a word that means “to be” or exist.

5. People cannot recollect having bad ones (8)
{MEMORIES} – If you can’t remember anything, then you wouldn’t have these.

6. Put your foot down to obtain new trade (5)
{TREAD} – An anagram (to obtain new) of TRADE.

7. He takes obstacles in his stride (7)
{HURDLER} – Someone who jumps over barriers in a race.

8. It currently controls others at building (8)
{RHEOSTAT} – An anagram (building) of OTHERS AT.

14. Understood vessel could be reserved (8)
{TACITURN} – A word that means implied or inferred without direct expression, is followed by a vase like receptacle.

16. A time to receive praise for virtue (9)
{ATTRIBUTE} – A T (time) and a gift or statement made in gratitude, or admiration could be a positive quality or characteristic.

17. Brewed ale round there is heavenly! (8)
{ETHEREAL} – An anagram (brewed) of ALE round THERE.

18. Stubborn Old Testament character has a New Testament following (7)
{ADAMANT} – The definition is stubborn, take the husband of Eve and add A and then NT (New Testament).

20. Rising singer joining company, a capital investment (7)
{CORONET} – Reverse the highest natural male adult voice (rising) and then place CO (company) on top to get a small crown that you might wear on your head.

22. Get up about mid-morning and wash (5)
{RINSE} – Take a word that means to assume a standing position, or get out of bed and place it around the middle letter of morning.

24. Gather together for hike (5)
{RAISE} – Double definition, to collect or to increase.

25. Dismal party game is upsetting (4)
{DOUR} – a two letter word for a party, is followed by RU (Rugby Union) reversed (upsetting).


The Quick crossword pun: {miss} + {demean} + {err} = {misdemeanor}

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49 Comments

  1. Poppy
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:12 am | Permalink

    Had fun doing this one, but still don’t understand the red top part of the solution for 23a… Happy Birthday to BD and this site. And thanks, too, to the setter and Libellule.

    • Libellule
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:16 am | Permalink

      Poppy,
      Red Top, is a term that describes a tabloid newspaper, e.g. the Sun or Daily Mirror for example.

  2. Poppy
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:14 am | Permalink

    :oops: just got it – sorry to be so slow…

  3. crypticsue
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:18 am | Permalink

    I obviously hadn’t woken up enough when I started on this one as it took me a good 2* time to sort it all out. Thanks to Rufus and Libellule.

  4. bifield
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:20 am | Permalink

    A pleasant romp for a Monday morning. I like anagrams so it gave me a good start.. Happy Birthday from me and thanks to setter and to Libellule for the review.

  5. Kevmcc
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:22 am | Permalink

    For some reason I didn’t like this one, although admittedly I didn’t help myself by putting the answer to 22d into 24d…that certainly didn’t help me evolve the answer to 27a.

  6. Kevmcc
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:25 am | Permalink

    Oh…Happy Birthday! Obviously not with it this morning as I did notice the 29th Jan 2009 tag on the site but sort of assumed it was today’s date! If only turning back the clock could be so easy…

    • Kevmcc
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:27 am | Permalink

      Just realised it’s 28th today….I’m definitely not with it.

  7. Sweet William
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:28 am | Permalink

    Anagram heaven ! It certainly helps to get things going ! Thank you Rufus for an enjoyable start to the week and Libellule for your review. The Pope’s headgear was a new one for me.

    • Poppy
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:35 am | Permalink

      And for me, SW. I’d only related my solution to the capital bit. But after your comment I checked properly, & found a definition of which I’d been ignorant before! Thanks.

      • Libellule
        Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:40 am | Permalink

        I like the name Poppy – I have a cat called Poppy too :-)

        • Jezza
          Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:54 am | Permalink

          I like the name too! (at the risk of being called a poppycat by the Rev Spooner) :)

          • Libellule
            Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:57 am | Permalink

            I wish I had thought of that – nice one.

          • Poppy
            Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:00 am | Permalink

            Enjoyed these comments very much :-D And my Poppy (shown in photo) is often mistaken for a cat. I haven’t managed to teach her to miaow yet – she’s still learning how to say “sossiges”!

            • mary
              Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

              My brother had a beautiful dog called Poppy who had unfortunately and very suddenly to be put to sleep last week, she was a beautiful rescue dog

              • Poppy
                Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:55 pm | Permalink

                Very sorry to hear that, Mary :-( but very good to know she was rescued

                • mary
                  Posted January 28, 2013 at 2:08 pm | Permalink

                  Yes they’d had her for ten years and she had a great life with them, she was about thirteen now, they always get rescue dogs and are already thinking of getting another

              • Kath
                Posted January 28, 2013 at 4:06 pm | Permalink

                That’s really sad – poor brother.

      • SheilaP
        Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:26 pm | Permalink

        I like the name Poppy too. I have a Jack Russell called Poppy.

        • Poppy
          Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:58 pm | Permalink

          Now what if all these ‘Poppy’s could blog…. !

          • skempie
            Posted January 28, 2013 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

            Could get a bit RUFF in here if they did

            • Poppy
              Posted January 28, 2013 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

              Like it! :-D

  8. Brenda Reding
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:58 am | Permalink

    Congratulations! 4 glorious years and many more to come, please. This site has helped, amused and educated thousands of would-be crossword solvers, you must be feeling very proud, and so you should.
    Today’s offering went down well, but spent ages trying to think of simple little 23A and wasn’t too sure about 24D, Raise for hike is stretching it a bit, surely? But enjoyable so thanks to Rufus and Libellule for an entertaining morning

    • skempie
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:01 am | Permalink

      Price hike = Price rise so it works for me

      • Heno
        Posted January 28, 2013 at 9:31 pm | Permalink

        Yes, I was just thinking of walking until the penny dropped.

    • Libellule
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:01 am | Permalink

      Brenda,
      One of the definitions for hike is – to increase or raise in amount, especially abruptly.

  9. skempie
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 10:58 am | Permalink

    I always thought yon popey person wore a mitre like other Bishops, oh well, you live and learn. Quite enjoyable today but maybe a few too many anagrams for my liking. For some reason I took ages to see 18A – not enough coffee I reckon. I don’t know why, but I always enjoy seeing 8D – even if its not in a crossword, perhaps I’m a bit weird or something.

    • Heno
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 9:41 pm | Permalink

      It’s not a word you often see. I first came across it in school physics lessons, when you could ignite wire wool in an electric circuit by moving the slider on the rheostat. Perhaps we could start a club for the Appreciation of Rheostats in the South East, though I suspect the acronym would be banned :-)

  10. Beaver
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:02 am | Permalink

    Gentle start ,ok for a monday and agree with a */***,bit heavy on the anagrams,thought 18d would have made a good ‘pic’ as he’s just making a comeback! wish Andy would look happy sometimes-25d would’nt do him justice.

  11. Jezza
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:05 am | Permalink

    Finished without any real difficulty this morning. Thanks to Rufus, and to Libellule.

    For an even gentler puzzle, there is always the Guardian Quiptic, which I thought had a few nice clues.

  12. Kath
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:40 am | Permalink

    I really liked this one and didn’t have any problems with it – unusual for me on a Monday. I like anagrams so they helped. Agree with Libellule’s ratings.
    I was a bit slow to get 18 and 23a and 14d. Also kept trying to make 19a something to do with deafness. I didn’t know that “His Popiness” wore a tiara.
    Favourites include 9, 11 and 15a and 3, 7 and 22d.
    With thanks to Rufus and Libellule.

  13. Posted January 28, 2013 at 11:53 am | Permalink

    Very enjoyable today. * and **** from me. Regds to all.

  14. Only fools
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

    Didn’t feel too bad about not knowing 2d when I found that one hasn’t been worn for 50 years . Usual agreeable start to the week and agree with the ratings .
    Thanks once again .

  15. Big Boab
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:15 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to Rufus and to Libellule, a gentle start to the week but too many anagrams for my personal taste.

  16. mary
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    Hapy birthday to the best blog ever and thanks and congratulations to Dave and all his helpers who have made it so :-)
    Good afternoon Libelulle, late again today having been to rehab, this was more like ‘normal’ Rufus, lots of clues I really liked, 10a,13a,5d, 18d etc. lots of nice anagrams too, thank you Libelulle for the hints, I didn’t know the popes hat was called a tiara, have only ever known it as a mitre, that and one down were my last two in today, a two to three star for me

  17. SheilaP
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:34 pm | Permalink

    Happy Birthday to you. Happy Birthday to you etc. etc. Great site. Couldn’t do without you. Thanks to all.

    • Sweet William
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

      Happy Birthday “Site” !! Wishing you many more enjoyable years – and to all those experts who give of their time to make it so interesting and such good fun !

  18. neveracrossword
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 2:31 pm | Permalink

    Enjoyable gentle cerebral exercise – but I don’t see what investment has to do with 20 d. Perhaps Chambers has the answer?

    • Libellule
      Posted January 28, 2013 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

      neveracrossword,

      Investment, (Archaic)
      A garment; a vestment. An outer covering or layer.

  19. Jaydubs
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 2:45 pm | Permalink

    Happy Birthday, many thanks for all the hard work by all the bloggers. Makes the daily crossword a real event!

  20. Colmce
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    This one didn’t fall into place as easily as a normal Rufus even with all the anagrams.
    So a 2* diff for me.
    Thanks to Libellule for the review and to Rufus for the puzzle.

  21. Terence
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

    A simple thank you for your daily wisdom which is so helpful in removing my block on the tougher clues.

    • Posted January 28, 2013 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

      Welcome to the blog Terence

  22. Brian
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 3:38 pm | Permalink

    I agree with one star for difficulty but even so totally failed to see 23a and didn’t get the capital investment bit until I read the hints. 1a took some getting as well, just couldn’t make the connection for ages. Not my finest hour but at least I won the golf!

  23. Annidrum
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

    I love anagrams. Lovely puzzle . I agree with */*** rating. Again learned something new today as in what the pope wears 0n his head. Thanks to Rufus and Libellule and Happy Birthday and many thanks to BD & all the bloggers for making this site the pleasure it is. :smile:

  24. 2Kiwis
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 5:55 pm | Permalink

    Nice gentle puzzle without too many problems apart from checking the potiff’s hat.
    Happy birthday Blog. We are saying this on the right day too as it is already 29th here. This blog has given us a whole extra dimension to cryptics. What used to be a solo venture has become a shared pleasure and very much appreciated for that.
    So today, as well as thanks to Rufus and Libellule, a very special thanks to BD and the team who made it all possible.

  25. Hrothgar
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 5:57 pm | Permalink

    Wonderful site, congratulations, many thanks and Happy Birthday.
    Nice start to the week, learned that The Pope wears what Royalty and titled ladies wear.
    Thanks Rufus and Libellule.

  26. Heno
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 9:28 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to Rufus & to Libellule for the review and hints. Congratulations on the Blog’s 4th Birthday thanks to all who have worked on it, and to Big Dave in particular, a fantastic achievement ! Would agree with Libellule’s star ratings. The only one that gave me any trouble was 24d which was last in. Favourites were 12a & 8d. Pleasant start to the crossword week. Nice start to the day in Central London, but the rain & wind has now set in.

  27. una
    Posted January 28, 2013 at 9:56 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to Rufus and Libellule.Nice crossword. Dreadful weather here,it remind’s me of King Lear on the heath.
    Happy birthday ! Great site.