Toughie 607

Toughie No 607 by Beam

Hints and tips by Big Dave

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BD Rating – Difficulty ****Enjoyment *****

Beam has given us another tough Toughie.  I wish that all Toughies were at least as good as this one!

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought. You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.

7a Becoming so crude, churning over inside (8)
{DECOROUS} – a word meaning becoming or polite and restrained is an anagram (churning) of SO CRUDE with O(ver) inside

9a Solution for the Spanish team in endless rage (6)
{ELIXIR} – this medicinal solution is created from the Spanish definite article followed by the Roman numerals representing a football 0or cricket team inside most or a word meaning rage or anger

10a Starts to linger on toilet seat getting piles (4)
{LOTS} – the initial letters of (starts to) four of the words in the clue give a word meaning piles or loads

11a Vessel ‘Titanic’, one coming first in sea (10)
{BRIGANTINE} – to get this two-masted vessel atart with a word meaning Titanic, move the I (one) to the fromt and then insert it inside another word for the sea or salty water

12a Strength of wine almost everybody imbibed (6)
{TALENT} – a strength or aptitude is created by putting a deep-red Spanish wine around (imbibed) most of a word meaning everybody

14a Pathetic record about love’s initial temptation I turned over (8)
{PITIABLE} – to get this adjective meaning pathetic or wretched put an old-fashioned vinyl record around the initial letter of Love, a temptation and I then reverse the lot (turned over)

15a ‘Beam’ taking time providing sign (6)
{RATIFY} – put a beam (our setter’s first name!) around T(ime) and a two-letter word meaning providing to get a word meaning to sign or authorize

17a Supporter’s someone fanatical collecting Queen (6)
{FRIEND} – this supporter or patron is a fanatic placed around the Latin abbreviation for queen (or king)

20a Avoid English embracing the French after huge kiss (8)
{OSCULATE} – put a word meaning to avoid or ignore and E(nglish) around the French feminine definite article and put it all after a two-letter abbreviation for huge to get a verb meaning to kiss

22a Doc Holliday’s end around West’s flipping fanciful (6)
{DREAMY} – put the title given to a doctor and the last letter (end) of HollidaY around the first name of film star Ms West reversed (flipping) to get a word meaning fanciful

23a Referee’s rubbish skill one supporter backed (10)
{ARBITRATOR} – to get this referee string together rubbish (3), a skill (3) I (one) and a supporting garment then reverse the lot (backed)

24a Greek character with sublime exterior? (4)
{MUSE} – a two-letter Greek character is followed by the outside (exterior) letters of SublimE to get one of the nine goddesses of the liberal arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne

 

25a ‘Ocean’s Eleven’ finally embracing old period (6)
{SEASON} – put oceans and the last letter (finally) of eleveN around (embracing) O(ld) to get a period of approximately three months

26a Agony containing laugh initially after ‘Tea, vicar?’ (8)
{CHAPLAIN} – put an agony around (containing) the initial letter of Laugh and after a colloquial word for tea to get a military vicar

Down

1d           Sophisticated young lady being shown (8)
{DEBONAIR} – a word meaning sophisticated or refined, if split (3,2,3), could mean a young lady (one making her first appearance in society) being shown on television

2d           Rose, put on Sunday clobber? (4)
{TOGS} – rose means got up, so reverse GOT (up in a down clue) and add S(unday) to get some clobber

3d           Located in supporting place to carry young marsupial (6)
{WOMBAT} – a word meaning located in is supporting (under in a down clue) a place to carry young to get a marsupial

4d           Big celebrity group raised around Georgia State mostly (8)
{MEGASTAR} – a big celebrity is created by putting a pop group (3) reversed (raised) around the zip code for the US state Georgia and most of STA(te)

5d           National contest with half of team collecting titles (10)
{VIETNAMESE} – a national from a country in the Far East is derived from a verb meaning to contest (3) and the first half of TE(am) around titles

6d           Sailing at sea missing current wave maybe (6)
{SIGNAL} – an anagram (at sea) of SAIL(I)NG without one of the Is (missing electric current) gives an action of which a wave is an example

8d           Heavens! Compiler’s with penny caught short (6)
{SKIMPY} – put the heavens around (caught) I’M (compiler is) and P(enny) to give a word meaning short or sparse

13d         Gourmet perhaps accordingly eats in, oddly outside (10)
{ENTHUSIAST} – a gourmet is an example of this person deeply interested in a particular subject – put a word meaning accordingly or therefore inside an anagram (oddly) of EATS IN

16d         Shameless criminal executed in middle of rafter (8)
{FLAGRANT} – a word meaning shameless or scandalous is created by putting a criminal and a verb meaning executed or carried out inside the middle letters of raFTer

18d         Daily argument for couple? (8)
{DOMESTIC} – a daily or charlady is also how the police refer to an argument between a couple who are living together

19d         Rushed Hague case in charge of holding court (6)
{HECTIC} – a word meaning rushed or agitated is created by putting the outside letters (case) of HaguE and the abbreviation for In Charge around (holding) C(our)T

21d         Got on board? (6)
{SURFED} – got on a board and rode the waves!

22d         Fishing pole raised by sailor nearly seeing fin (6)
{DORSAL} – reverse a pole used for fishing and then add most of a slang term for a sailor to get the fin on the back of a fish

24d         Philosopher’s in place to find stone (4)
{MILL} – the surname of the philosopher John Stuart is also somewhere that a stone used for grinding may be found

Those who think Ray T’s backpage puzzles ought to be Toughies should try this one!


25 Comments

  1. Posted August 2, 2011 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

    Oddly enough, I didn’t think it was that tough – challenging and enjoyable but I got there with a minimum of external help.

  2. Franco
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

    Excellent puzzle today from Beam!

    Surprised that I persevered after only getting one single solution after two passes (10a – of course).

    Shameless in his flagrant use of his trademark clues ( 10a,15a + 17a )

    Couldn’t solve 2d – thought “togs” but don’t know why.

    • Posted August 2, 2011 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

      Rose = got up = TOG

      • Franco
        Posted August 2, 2011 at 3:03 pm | Permalink

        Oh Dear! So obvious! Still – piles of fun!

  3. pommers
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

    Did this one last night when the brain apparantly doesn’t work too well, judging by a couple of Wednesday blogs I’ve done overnight!
    Glad to see the 4* rating as I found this ‘Tough but Fair’.
    Well clued and with quite a few penny-drop moments!
    Favourites were 10a, 11a and 3d.
    Never heard of the philosopher in 24d and when I keyed the name into Wiki it came up with 3 of them! I wonder which one Beam was thinking of?
    Thanks Beam for a late night brain workout and thanks in anticipation to BD.

    • Posted August 2, 2011 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

      In Crosswordland it’s usually John Stuart Mill!

      • pommers
        Posted August 2, 2011 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

        Hello Dave
        Thanks for that, I’ll try to remember him.
        Wiki came up with these 3:-
        Harriet Taylor Mill (1807–1858), a philosopher and women’s rights advocate
        James Mill (1773–1836), a Scottish historian, economist and philosopher
        John Stuart Mill (1806–1873), an influential classical liberal thinker and philosopher of the 19th century, son of James Mill

        P.S. Thought the ‘TOG’ it was quite clever!

        • Qix
          Posted August 2, 2011 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

          Very likely to be JS Mill, as immortalised by Monty Python: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_WRFJwGsbY

          • pommers
            Posted August 2, 2011 at 4:28 pm | Permalink

            Thanks Qix – I’d forgotten that sketch!

          • Franco
            Posted August 2, 2011 at 4:45 pm | Permalink

            Nice clip from Monty Python! You seem to have your own views on everything but “There’s nothing Nietzsche couldn’t teach ya!”

  4. pegasus
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    A corking Toughie from Beam today, favourite clues 9a 11a and 5d thanks to Beam and to Big Dave in anticipation.

  5. birdie
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 3:50 pm | Permalink

    Very challenging today, I thought. I only managed about three quarters and was completely stumped by the rest. I enjoyed solving the clues that I did manage to get, so I don’t mind too much about not finishing. One of those puzzles that helps solvers like me improve. Thanks to Beam and BD.

    • andy
      Posted August 2, 2011 at 3:52 pm | Permalink

      Rather than repeating you as I would have done, shall just say I agree

  6. Prolixic
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 3:58 pm | Permalink

    Highly enjoyable crossword from Beam today. Many thanks to him for the challenge. A few clues in the NE corner required a bit of perservation but they fell in the end. Many thanks too to BD for the review.

  7. Qix
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

    Enjoyed this one a lot, esp 2d and 15a.

  8. crypticsue
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 5:10 pm | Permalink

    If someone had said to me this morning, ‘which one of today’s cryptics will give you the most trouble?’ I certainly wouldn’t have put the Beam Toughie anywhere near the top of the list, but this was the only one I didn’t finish as I had a lot of problems with the SE corner. I did like 10a, 11a, 20a, 22a, 3d and 8d but did end up on the grumpy-with-myself-side of happy. Thanks Ray for the challenging challenge and to BD for the hints which I certainly needed for two (but I am not going to admit which two!).

    • Franco
      Posted August 2, 2011 at 5:25 pm | Permalink

      It’s very reassuring for amateurs, like myself, that for once you have posted a comment saying that you found a puzzle somewhat difficult! There is hope for us all!

      • crypticsue
        Posted August 2, 2011 at 6:03 pm | Permalink

        I am an amateur too – just been solving them for a very long time – and becoming more addicted every day.

  9. pommers
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 6:19 pm | Permalink

    Nice piccies Dave – obviously I’m referring to 24d!

  10. AtH1900
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 6:39 pm | Permalink

    A nice Toughie today.

  11. RayT
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 7:03 pm | Permalink

    Many thanks to BD for the analysis, and of course to all who commented. Much appreciated, as always.

    RayT

    • pommers
      Posted August 2, 2011 at 8:03 pm | Permalink

      Thanks Ray – a brilliant puzzle!

  12. Posted August 2, 2011 at 8:12 pm | Permalink

    Certainly not the usual Tuesday ease-in to the Toughie week – the crossword editor seems to be mixing things up a bit recently.
    Very enjoyable puzzle from Beam – thanks to him and to BD.

  13. spencer may
    Posted August 2, 2011 at 11:06 pm | Permalink

    I managed the SE corner but when I got 24a I knew it was going to be super-hard. Kept thinking 15a was notify…only complaint is 21d. A bit vague or is that just me?

    • Posted August 2, 2011 at 11:50 pm | Permalink

      Spencer

      Each time you change your name and/or your email address your comment gets sent for moderation!

      spencermay / spencerthe artist / spencer may