DT 26030

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 26030

Hints and tips by Gazza

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BD Rating – Difficulty ** Enjoyment ***

Because I’m away tomorrow, Libellule has kindly agreed to swap reviews and he will be doing tomorrow’s. The one he’s missed out on today is pretty straightforward with well-crafted clues but nothing to make you break out in peals of laughter.
As usual the answers are hidden inside the curly brackets so that you cannot see them accidentally – just select the white space between the brackets if you want to reveal one.
As always we’d love to get comments from you.

Across Clues

1a  The cost of keeping horses makes you irritable (6)
{LIVERY} – double definition – this word appeared as recently as last Friday in DT 26025.

4a  What you need is liquid preparation (8 )
{SOLUTION} – double definition, the first being what you need to find in order to write in the answer.

9a  One holds one’s drink, with a right to enter greasy spoon (6)
{CARAFE} – a greasy spoon is a CAFÉ – insert A R(ight) to get a flask used for serving wine or water.

10a  Measures against viral infection result in loss of nerve (4,4)
{COLD FEET} – put FEET (measures) after (against) COLD (viral infection) to get a phrase meaning loss of nerve.

12a  Is it done for changing issues? (8 )
{EDITIONS} – an anagram (for changing) of IS IT DONE produces issues, of newspapers for example.

13a  Squirm, seeing legal document served by ambassador (6)
{WRITHE} – a charade of WRIT (legal document) and HE (His Excellency, ambassador) produces a verb meaning to squirm.

15a  On drugs and volatile — it could be the cause of an outburst (4,9)
{HIGH EXPLOSIVE} – put together HIGH (on drugs) and EXPLOSIVE (volatile). This does not work terribly well for me, because volatile and outburst are too similar.

18a  Apocryphal stories from men who are divorced (3,5,5)
{OLD WIVES TALES} – men who are divorced might exchange horror stories about their ex-partners. This expression also means widely-held traditional, but unscientific, beliefs, such as the one that if a woman sleeps with a piece of wedding cake under her pillow she will dream of the man she will marry.

22a  Finally address grave-sounding screenplay (6)
{SCRIPT} – start with the last letter (finally) of addresS and add a sound-alike of CRYPT (grave-sounding) to get a screenplay.

24a  Spring mist obscures riot beginning in children’s game (8 )
{LEAPFROG} – put together LEAP (spring) and FOG (mist) and insert (obscures) the first letter (beginning) of Riot to end up with a children’s game.

26a  Sick individual working to embrace America’s fantasy (8 )
{ILLUSION} – string together ILL (sick), I (individual, one) and ON (switched on, working), and insert US (America) to end up with a fantasy.

27a  One’s promised to provide backing, one name having dropped out (6)
{FIANCE} – start off with FINANCE (backing) and take out the first N (one name having dropped out) to leave one’s intended (promised).

28a  Part of computer that’s crucial to have on table (8 )
{KEYBOARD} – a charade of KEY (crucial) and BOARD (table).

29a  Accepts a good wise man returning (6)
{AGREES} – put together A, G(ood) and SEER (prophet or wise man) which has to be reversed (returning) to get a synonym for accepts or concurs.

Down Clues

1d  Key storage area (6)
{LOCKER} – double definition, the first cryptic, the second  where you might store your clothes and effects whilst swimming for example.

2d  Put a coat on and disappeared around the end of December (9)
{VARNISHED} – disappeared is VANISHED – insert the last letter (end) of DecembeR to get a verb meaning applied a coat of resinous solution.

3d  Searching unimportant — wasting time (7)
{RIFLING} – unimportant is TRIFLING – take off the T (wasting time) to leave a synonym for searching.

5d  One’s played for nothing in order … (4)
{OBOE} – the order is OBE (Order of the British Empire) – insert O (zero, nothing) to get a musical instrument.

6d  …to experience initial excitement in new ground (7)
{UNDERGO} – put the initial letter of Excitement inside an anagram (new) of GROUND and you get a synonym for to experience.

7d  Useless writer’s put up in it (5)
{INEPT} – reverse (put up) PEN inside IT to get an adjective meaning useless.

8d  Talked of new leader — poorly treated (8 )
{NATTERED} – start with the first letter (leader) of New and add an anagram (poorly) of TREATED to produce a verb meaning talked or gossiped.

11d  Went in and made a record (7)
{ENTERED} – double definition, the second meaning wrote, or keyed, information in.

14d  Saw last of essays to be summarised (7)
{SPOTTED} – a synonym for saw is produced from the last letter of essayS followed by POTTED (summarised).

16d  Sun in race for circulation and coverage (9)
{INSURANCE} – an anagram (for circulation) of SUN IN RACE produces the sort of cover you buy in case something unexpected happens.

17d  Delights confronting credit controller in aircraft (3-5)
{JOY-STICK} – put JOYS (delights) in front of TICK (credit) to get the controlling mechanism in an aircraft.

19d  One starts to make progress concerning such painting (7)
{IMPASTO} – put together I (one), MP (start letters of Make Progress) and AS TO (concerning) and you end up with a type of art involving paint or pigment being laid on thickly so that it stands out from the surface.

20d  Drink put on part of plane for flyer (7)
{LAPWING} – a charade of LAP (drink) and WING (part of plane) produces a large plover.

21d  Early goals at start — rest troubled wingers (6)
{EGRETS} – the starting letters of Early Goals are followed by an anagram (troubled) of REST to get types of heron.

23d  Race to put the carpet down again? (5)
{RELAY} – double definition, the first being a type of race between teams of competitors where only one athlete from each team is competing at a time.

25d  Contributor doesn’t have the heart to find a way out (4)
{DOOR} – contributor is DONOR – take out the N (doesn’t have the heart) to leave a way out (or in).

Of today’s clues I liked 18a and 16d, but my clue of the day is 17d. What do you think? – leave us a comment, and please don’t forget to vote below to record your assessment of the puzzle.


12 Comments

  1. Vince
    Posted September 10, 2009 at 11:10 am | Permalink

    Gazza, I enjoyed this. As you say fairly straightforward, but there were some good clues, such as the 3 you mentioned, plus 27a and 3d.

    Why do compilers use ellipses as in 5d & 6d, implying some connection between two clues, when there is none?

    • gazza
      Posted September 10, 2009 at 11:20 am | Permalink

      Vince
      Sometimes the ellipses are very significant (see yesterday’s Toughie 213, clues 2d/3d) at other times not.
      One of the setters (Ray T) commented on this in DT 26022.

      • Vince
        Posted September 10, 2009 at 11:34 am | Permalink

        Gazza

        Thanks. I missed that blog, as I was away on a short break. I’ve often wondered – and now I know!

  2. Jezza
    Posted September 10, 2009 at 11:18 am | Permalink

    I enjoyed this too! Relatively easy today… even the Toughie is not too demanding.. I’ll have to search for another puzzle to keep me occupied in sunny Wimbledon.

    • gnomethang
      Posted September 10, 2009 at 12:08 pm | Permalink

      Ditto that – I had the DT and the Toughie finished before London Bridge (about 15 Mins and 30 Mins respectively with one of the Sudoku in between). I’ve only ever twice completed the DT and the Times cryptic in that journey.

      Having said that the Toughie was not so tough I thought it had some great clues, as did this (22a and 24a)

  3. Prolixic
    Posted September 10, 2009 at 1:56 pm | Permalink

    This was pleasing diversion whilst waiting for the train this morning. I liked 2d – it conjoured up the image of someone storming out of the house on New Year’s Eve, never to be seen again!

    • gazza
      Posted September 10, 2009 at 2:43 pm | Permalink

      Prolixic, welcome to the blog.
      I’m sorry for the delay in the appearance of your comment. All “first comments” have to be moderated to eliminate spam – any future comments you make will appear straight away,

  4. Jane
    Posted September 10, 2009 at 2:36 pm | Permalink

    i agree with the comments above. Think I will attempt the Toughie now!

    • gazza
      Posted September 10, 2009 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

      Jane
      If this is the first time you’ve tried a Toughie, then you could not have picked a better one to start on. Today’s is barely more tricky than an average daily cryptic.

  5. bigboab
    Posted September 10, 2009 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

    No better than OK.

  6. Emandan
    Posted September 11, 2009 at 6:28 am | Permalink

    Has the thursday compiler changed? I have always found Thursdays realtively hard but i finished this one with almost no help at all, just impasto i wasn’t sure about.

    • Posted September 11, 2009 at 10:06 am | Permalink

      Not that I am aware of, he has visited the blog previously as Jay. Perhaps he might confirm that this is one of his.

      Maybe you are just getting better at them!