DT 28180

Daily Telegraph No 28180

A full review by crypticsue

This puzzle was published on 30th July 2016

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BD Rating – Difficulty **- Enjoyment ***

I found this a smidge trickier than the usual Saturday offering.


1a           Song about Ross Poldark initially being a surly fellow (10)
CROSSPATCH – CATCH (a song which the BRB describes as a round for three or more voices, often deriving comic effect from the interweaving of the words) goes about ROSS (from the clue) P (Poldark initially)

6a           Prevent trophies being sent back (4)
STOP – A reversal (sent back) of POTS (trophies)

9a           Tablet with primrose that’s got rid of cold — you’ll sleep on it (10)
PILLOWSLIP – PILL (tablet) and COWSLIP (a member of the primrose family without  the C for Cold)

10a         Yield of grain reported (4)
CEDE – An homophone (reported) of SEED (grain)

12a         Vegetable that’s acceptable uncooked mostly (4)
OKRA – OK (acceptable) and RAw (uncooked ‘mostly’)

13a         See a lush reeling round old pubs (9)
ALEHOUSES – An anagram (reeling) of SEE A LUSH ‘round’ O (old)

15a         Liking a swan song (8)
PENCHANT – PEN (female swan) CHANT (song)

16a         Quaker founding US state concerned with flag (6)
PENNON – PENN (the Quaker who founded Pennsylvania) ON (concerned with)

18a         Show sullen face about a second-grade work (6)
LABOUR – LOUR (show sullen face) goes ‘about’ A (from the clue) and B (second-grade)

20a         Veteran sundial maybe (3-5)
OLD-TIMER – a sundial being (maybe) an example of an old way of telling the time

23a         Depressed with French and having to enter for every programme (4,5)
BLUE PETER –  BLUE (depressed) and ET (the French for with) entering PER (for every)

24a         Author, ‘On the Beach’? (4)
SAND – The French author has the same name as something we’d find on the beach.

26a         Language of Jaipur dude (4)
URDU – Hidden in JaipUR DUde.     I did check and my internet searches appear to show that a dude in Jaipur would probably speak Hindi!

27a         Rescue vehicle perhaps transported the police by river (10)
HELICOPTER – An anagram (transported) of THE POLICE ‘by’ R (river)

28a         Prepare line for fish (4)
DORY – DO (prepare) RY (railway [line])

29a         Herded by police, odd one that’s given a beating (10)
KETTLEDRUM – KETTLED (a word coined to describe the action of protesters being herded into an enclosed area by police) RUM (odd)


1d           Hat on European’s head (4)
CAPE – CAP (hat) E (European)

2d           Paints family in fisherman’s clothing (7)
OILSKIN – OILS (paints) KIN (family)

3d           Bear trainers will get equipment for emergencies (7,5)
STOMACH (bear) PUMPS (trainers) – calling trainers ‘pumps’ very much depends which part of the country you come from!

4d           Graduate’s upset with marks, refuses a drink (8)
ABSTAINS – A reversal (upset in a Down clue) of BA (graduate) followed by STAINS (marks)

5d           Tool that man’s taken into small room that’s unfinished (6)
CHISEL – HIS (that man’s) ‘taken into’ an unfinished CELl

7d           Corrupt senator betraying country (7)
TREASON – An anagram (corrupt) of SENATOR

8d           Jocular remark having drunk ales in storeroom (10)
PLEASANTRY – An anagram (drunk) of ALES inserted into a PANTRY (storeroom)

11d         Favour including location of Villa’s museum piece (7,5)
ROSETTA STONE –  ASTON (the home of Villa the football team) included in ROSETTE (favour)

14d         Captivated in spring time — contrariwise (10)
SPELLBOUND –  Contrariwise tells you that the SPELL (time) goes before the BOUND (spring)

17d         Causing panic in the manner of king on film (8)
ALARMIST – A LA (in the manner of) R (Rex, king) MIST (film)

19d         Mistake put British Library in inferior position (7)
BLUNDER – BL (British Library) UNDER (in inferior position)

21d         Drive round Northern Ireland track (7)
MONITOR – MOTOR (drive) goes round NI (Northern Ireland)

22d         Greek goddess took meal including chicken (6)
ATHENE –  ATE (took meal) including HEN (chicken).  

25d         Fraternal author of tales mostly gloomy (4)
GRIM – Almost all of the surname of the brothers who wrote mostly gloomy tales.




  1. Hilary
    Posted August 5, 2016 at 9:11 am | Permalink | Reply

    Thanks Sue, typically my notes have disappeared but looking at your review I remember that I enjoyed this solve. 1a made me smile and that is all I can recall, must hang on to notes for future reference.

  2. Jose
    Posted August 5, 2016 at 11:41 am | Permalink | Reply

    This was very good for a Saturday Prize (usually they are quite elementary/easy). 9a: I initially bunged in PILLOWCASE, gleefully convincing myself that COWCASE was another name for a primrose. It’s funny how these cryptic clues can sometimes play tricks with your thought processes.

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