Toughie 1368

Toughie No 1368 by Osmosis

Rockin ‘n’ Rollin’

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty ***Enjoyment **

There were rather too many (five of each, highlighted in yellow below) first/last letter constructs to lift the enjoyment level of this otherwise competent puzzle.

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Across

1a    I’m afraid adverse vision restricts Charlie dressing (5,5)
SALAD CREAM: the reversal (adverse) of a four-letter word meaning “I’m afraid” or “regrettably” is followed by a vision around (restricts) the letter represented by Charlie in the NATO Phonetic alphabet

6a    Domestic entrance shortened (4)
CHAR: drop the final letter (shortened) from a verb meaning to entrance

9a    Centre of exhibition consumed music fan escorted by bird (4,6)
TATE MODERN: a verb meaning consumed or ingested and a sixties music fan, one who typically rode a scooter, inside (indicated weakly as escorted by) a bird

10a    Standard‘s left — bother to pick it up? (4)
FLAG: L(eft) inside (to pick it up) a bother or nuisance

12a    Stars lacking one figure of worship (4)
ARES: drop (lacking) the I (one) from a constellation (stars) to get the Greek God of War

13a    Self-proclaimed soldier not fanciful (9)
IMAGINARY: a self-proclaimed US soldier (1’1,1,2) followed by a dialect word meaning not

15a    At festival site, one creates powerful punch (8)
HAYMAKER: the site of a literary festival followed by a noun meaning one who creates

16a    Extremists in Greenwich start to incite popular leader (6)
GANDHI: the outer letters (extremists) of G[reenwic]H, expressed as (1,3,1) followed by the initial letter of (start to) I[ncite]

18a    Accountant and lawyer the latest in company to drop in (4,2)
CALL BY: a Scottish (or Canadian) Chartered Accountant followed by a legal qualification and the final letter (latest) of [company]Y

20a    Aquatic life centre in acres, open space around cafe oddly lacking (3,5)
RED ALGAE: the middle letter (centre) of [ac]R[es] followed by the reversal (around) of an open space or clearing and [c]A[f]E without (lacking) its odd letters

23a    Thief‘s monetary handout grabbed by criminal baron (9)
BANDOLERO: a monetary handout to the unemployed inside (grabbed by) an anagram (criminal) of BARON

24a    ID of evasive revolutionary (4)
VISA: hidden (of) and reversed (revolutionary) inside the clue

26a    Vehicle service contract’s ending (4)
RAFT: a military service followed by the final letter (ending) of [contrac]T

27a    Gran joins ritual dancing involving three people? (10)
TRIANGULAR: an anagram (dancing) of GRAN with RITUAL

28a    Educational institution‘s security device (4)
YALE: two definitions

29a    Don, Sheffield’s foremost river in which triathletes swim (10)
SPORTSWEAR: a verb meaning to don or display followed by the initial letter (foremost) of S[heffield] and a river in the North East of England

Down

1d    Retreat outside in sunshine and dry (4)
SETT: the outer letters of S[unshin]E followed by an abbreviation meaning dry or abstemious

2d    To stop bug, computer department provides service (7)
LITURGY: inside (to stop) an alternative spelling of Spike Milligan’s favourite bug put the two-letter abbreviation for the computer department to get a service in church

3d    Large-scale survey some organised during critical time on reserve (8,4)
DOMESDAY BOOK: an anagram (organised) of SOME inside (during) a critical time, especially 6 June 1944 in WWII, followed by a verb meaning to reserve

4d    Paper’s stern editors, holding nothing back, checked thus? (3-5)
RED-LINED: the final letter (stern) of [pape]R followed by a pair of ED(itor)s around (holding) the reversal (back) of a three-letter word meaning nothing

5d    Display appropriate cushion (6)
AIRBAG: a charade of verbs meaning to display and to appropriate or steal

7d    Rope that’s eighteen inches when foot’s added? (7)
HALYARD: split this answer as (3,4) and add F(oot) to the first part and the result measures up to eighteen inches

8d    School providing reflective singlet curtailed game (5,5)
RUGBY FIVES: the school where this game was first played followed by the reversal (reflective) of a two-letter word meaning providing and a singlet without its final letter (curtailed)

11d    Gambler seen here sticks with six, five and a picture of the King? (4,3,5)
VIVA LAS VEGAS: the US city that is a magnet for gamblers preceded by the Roman numerals for six and five and the A from the clue to get a picture / film that starred Elvis Presley, the King of Rock’n’Roll

14d    Rock ‘n’ roller‘s fling with X being bound to slip up (5,5)
CHUCK BERRY: this rock ‘n’ roller, nicknamed Crazy Legs, is derived from a fling or throw followed by the two-letter word that that X can represent in mathematics around (bound) a verb meaning to slip up or make a mistake

17d    Courteous and elegant, dressed up to attract upstanding Scot (8)
DEBONAIR: the reversal (up in a down clue) of an adjective meaning dressed or clothed around the reversal (upstanding, also in a down clue) of a typical Scottish forename

19d    Learners going about martial arts class topless getting much fresh air? (7)
LUNGFUL: a pair of L(earner)s around a martial art (4,2) without its initial letter (topless)

21d    Ballet shoe’s binding, during breather, examined primarily (7)
GISELLE: the outer letters (binding) of S[ho]E inside the respiratory organ of fish (breather) and followed by the initial letter (primarily) of E[xamined]

22d    Soldier on bar doing pull-up receives appreciation (4,2)
BEAR UP: the reversal (doing pull-up) of a bar or inn around (receives) some appreciation or attention

25d    Indication of iciness from head of Biology — pupils soon learn this? (4)
BRRR: the initial letter (head) of B[iology] followed by the three-letter abbreviation for academic studies

Watch out for an announcement about Sloggers and Betters 12 – coming soon!

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10 Comments

  1. crypticsue
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 2:03 pm | Permalink

    **/*** for me – I did like 25d. Thanks to Osmosis and BD.

  2. gazza
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 2:13 pm | Permalink

    I thought that this was a bit below par for a Friday Toughie. Thanks to Osmosis and BD.
    Did I spot a Nina in columns 2 and 14?

  3. Pegasus
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

    Fairly gentle for a Friday yet enjoyable, favourites were 21d and 23a, I did notice the across answers all contained either one two or three A’s. Thanks to Osmosis and to Big Dave for the review.

  4. jean-luc cheval
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 3:34 pm | Permalink

    Found it quite tough for a change.
    7 and 8d were my last ones as I was trying to get Caliph in 16a.
    Needed the review to finish.
    Noticed all these initials and finals but what I noticed even more was the amount of words to be written backwards.
    Thanks to Osmosis and to BD for his great help.

    • jean-luc cheval
      Posted March 27, 2015 at 4:07 pm | Permalink

      Five initial + six back + five final = FIVE!

  5. Wolfson Bear
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 6:00 pm | Permalink

    I found this quite hard going. This is most probably due to a very pronounced feeling of fatigue which is why I am back home early! I also found the Giovanni harder than usual. Overall I am rather glad the DT did not throw in a Friday stinker this week as I was (still am) too mentally lethargic to have appreciated it.

    Thanks to all

  6. 2Kiwis
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 6:06 pm | Permalink

    22a was our stumbling-block. Suspect that having both ‘bar’ and ‘up’ in the wordplay convinced us that they were too close to the answer to be right. 1d had us head scratching too until we twigged the TT bit of wordplay. Apart from those it went together smoothly but not very quickly. Enjoyed it.
    Thanks Osmosis and BD.
    PS, Should not the definition for 22d be ‘soldier on’ rather than just ‘soldier’ ?

    • Posted March 27, 2015 at 6:39 pm | Permalink

      I thought I had underlined the “on” – I have now!

      Thanks

  7. halcyon
    Posted March 27, 2015 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

    Very enjoyable. Particularly liked the clever 7d, the witty 11d and the lovely surface of 29a [City of my birth].
    Many thanks to Osmosis and to BD for the blog.

  8. Expat Chris
    Posted March 28, 2015 at 9:31 am | Permalink

    What a difference a day makes. Yesterday, I just could not get into this, and put it aside with just a few answers completed. In the wee small hours of today, I picked it up again and, with two or three exceptions that I had to work harder to parse, the answers just flowed. I liked 1A because it’s something we were deprived of for many years until a new supermarket with a good international section opened just 30 miles away. 25D is my favorite, though. With thanks to Osmosis and to BD for the review.