ST 2738

Sunday Telegraph Cryptic No 2738

A full review by gnomethang

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BD Rating – Difficulty *Enjoyment ****

This puzzle was published on  Sunday, 6th April 2014

Morning All! This was one of my quickest Sunday solves as everything fell into place quite nicely. Still lots of fun to complete and running through the wordplay was a delight as ever.

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought.  You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.

Across

1a           Support, then scold, inferior (6-4)
SECOND-RATE – A charade of SECOND (support/back) then RATE (scold, a synonym of berate as well).

6a           Covering a sound sleeper? (4)
ATOP – Covering is an adjective here. A sound sleeper sleeps like A TOP.

9a           Armed civilians prepare to fire back across one line with it (7)
MILITIA – AIM (prepare to fire) reversed (back) and going around (across) I for one and L for line and (with) IT. M (I) (L) (IT) IA

10a         Declaring a short volume outstanding (7)
AVOWING – A charade of A from the clue then the abbreviation (abb.)  of V for Volume and finally OWING (outstanding or due as in a bill)

12a         Declaration you or I, say, stick at the end (13)
PRONOUNCEMENT – A lovely clue. You and I are both examples of a PRONOUN. Add CEMENT or stick at the end.

14a         I accordingly must join legal group on which pressure is constant (6)
ISOBAR – I and SO (accordingly or thus) joining the BAR (a legal group).

15a         Skilfully arrange language that’s brief, stylish, and always poetic (8)
ENGINEER – ENG, the abb. (brief) of the English language) then IN for stylish and EER, the poetic way to write ever or always.

17a         Act of pulling drunk into cart (8)
TRACTION – An anagram (drunk) of INTO CAR. He probably deserved it!

19a         It’s all right to scoff as I bleed terribly (6)
EDIBLE – Scoff here means eat. A terrible anagram of I BLEED (but not that terrible!).

22a         Since bank worker is hiding strain, who knows what is going to happen? (7-6)
FORTUNE-TELLER – FOR (since/because) and a bank TELLER hiding TUNE or musical strain.

24a         Add weight, about pound — or remove bulge? (7)
FLATTEN – FATTEN (add weight) around the outside of L for Librum (a pound).

25a         Get nothing to write song for this kind of concert (4-3)
OPEN-AIR – A charade of O for nothing and PEN AIR (write song).

26a         Thief might gain entrance after picking this university (4)
YALE – The most famous lock manufacturer in the world and also an Ivy League University.

27a         Cheered up after book’s corrected (10)
BRIGHTENED – Simply B for Book (an abb. from the Bible classification) and RIGHTENED or corrected.

Down

1d           Problem in adding ring for foreign form of fighting (4)
SUMO – SUM (a problem) adding the O which is a Crosswordland ring or circle.

2d           In county, foolishly plays number of West Indians (7)
CALYPSO – A number is a synonym for a song (as in strain and tune). Place an anagram (foolishly) of PLAYS inside CO, the abb. for County.

3d           Preserving organisation in part of Bible? Initially it could be (8,5)
NATIONAL TRUST – The initial letters of the New Testament (NT) are also the abbreviation for the National Trust.

4d           Reach logical conclusions about a child (6)
REASON– A charade of RE (about/reference), A from the clue and SON – one of the two choices of child to a parent..

5d           Doing exercises in minimal temperature, then showering (8)
TRAINING – T, the abb. (minimal) for Temperature followed by (then) RAINING or showering.

7d           Wear the writer out, crossing river in ancient vessel (7)
TRIREME – Place TIRE ME (wear out the person writer in the first person) around the outside of R for River

8d           Summon artist producing exciting work (4-6)
PAGE-TURNER – To PAGE is to summon via an horrible electronic gadget. Add TURNER – the famous British landscape artist.

11d         Until governed in reformed way, too permissive (13)
OVERINDULGENT – A nicely spotted anagram (in a reformed way) of UNTIL GOVERNED.

13d         Equally, it’s central for school-leaver (5-5)
FIFTY-FIFTY = The centre letters in schooL Leaver are LL, which are the Roman Numerals for Fifty and Fifty.

16d         In taking over, normal person put in charge (8)
GOVERNOR – Hidden IN (from the clue) the second to fourth words.

18d         Display armour in overseas post? (7)
AIRMAIL –  A charade od AIR (display_ and MAIL (chain mail armour).

20d         What non-profit organisations do a good deal (7)
BARGAIN – A non profit organisation will BAR (ban) GAIN (profit).

21d         Fit in part of label on garment (6)
BELONG – Another hidden word (part of) the last three words of the clue.

23d         Gave rise to bishop and cardinal, say (4)
BRED – The abb. B for Bishop and then RED, of which Cardinal is an example colour (say).

Thanks to Virgilius for the puzzle – I will see you all next Thursday for more of the same.

 

3 Comments

  1. Catnap
    Posted April 17, 2014 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    Super crossword and a super review to match!http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_rose.gif

    I really like the clarity of the explanations. As I always write on my hard copy when I do a puzzle, I can still see exactly where I went wrong! I read 26a as an all-in-one and missed the double definition in 11d. Very foolishly, I didn’t pick up on the ‘LL’ in 13d, so enlightenment was much appreciated. I shall be on the lookout for this type of clue in future.

    Thanks and appreciation to both Virgilius and Gnomethang.http://bigdave44.com/wp-content/plugins/wp-monalisa/icons/wpml_good.gif

    (So sorry. I’ve missed an ‘i’ from the email address. Time I got specs for computing, I think! My sincere apologies.)

    • gnomethang
      Posted April 17, 2014 at 3:21 pm | Permalink

      Thanks catnap. i have moderated the missing I so if you do it again it won’t matter!

      • Catnap
        Posted April 17, 2014 at 3:26 pm | Permalink

        Thanks, Gnomethang. That’s most kind of you. Sorry to have caused a problem.