Toughie 1066

Toughie No 1066 by Excalibur

1066 And All That

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BD Rating – Difficulty **Enjoyment **

Most of the answers here went in fairly easily and it might have been 1* for difficulty if I hadn’t been held up in the NW corner (due to my incorrect assumption that rum in 3d was an anagram indicator and my failure to realise that exorcising in 7a was meant to be one).

Let us know how you got on and please use the star system (below) to rate the puzzle for enjoyment.

Across Clues

7a  Priest may take a month exorcising this? (7)
{PHANTOM} – the single-character abbreviation for priest followed by an anagram (exorcising?) of A MONTH. I can’t see how exorcising can indicate an anagram.

8a  Crime rate’s changed and there’s no going back (7)
{TREASON} – an anagram (changed) of RATE’S and then a reversal of NO.

10a  Like kindly pensioner having a drink? (3,3,4)
{OLD AND MILD} – double definition. The drink is a mixture of two beers, also called a granny (old and bitter, on the other hand, is known as a mother-in-law!). There’s an interesting article here on the different meanings of these terms in the past.

11a  Going back in class to teach children (4)
{TOTS} – hidden and reversed in the clue.

12a  Goes along with prisoners, holding criminal records (8)
{CONFORMS} – an abbreviation for prisoners containing a slang term for criminal records.

14a  Transport isn’t prepared to carry Gunners (6)
{TRAINS} – an anagram (prepared) of ISN’T holding the abbreviation for the Royal Artillery.

15a  Focus on money box outside (11)
{CONCENTRATE} – ON (from the clue) and a foreign coin with a box around them.

19a  Maintain legalese mostly needs rewriting (6)
{ALLEGE} – an anagram (needs rewriting) of LEGALE(se).

20a  Allowing people to see one’s angry is degrading (8)
{LOWERING} – double definition, degrading in the sense of demoting.

22a  Comfortable with arms presented rearwards (4)
{SNUG} – ‘presented rearwards’ indicates a reversal.

23a  Not returning for the letter (10)
{TENANTLESS} – cryptic description of a property currently providing no financial return on the landlord’s investment.

25a  What reveals woman has husband — and often gets pickled (7)
{HERRING} – split the answer (3,4) for the indication of a woman’s marital status.

26a  A poet may produce this minor triumph? (7)
{COUPLET} – cryptically this could be a small success.

Down Clues

1d  Will get back to plant (7)
{SHALLOT} – start with an auxiliary verb, similar to will, which can be used either for a future action (‘he will arrive later’) or a firm intention (‘I will succeed’). After that reverse TO.

2d  Double-sided foreign coin (4)
{ANNA} – double-sided here is meant to indicate a palindrome – I don’t think it works.

3d  Many, given more rum, are tottery (6)
{DODDER} – a Roman numeral followed by a comparative meaning more rum.

4d  He believes  you have money that belongs to him (8)
{CREDITOR} – double definition – someone who believes or trusts and someone owed money.

5d  Expert  from whom one can no longer learn anything (4,6)
{PAST MASTER} – double definition. This actually means an expert, but it could also refer to a retired schoolteacher.

6d  Augur‘s sinister, getting close (7)
{PORTEND} – a charade of sinister or left at sea and a synonym for close or finish.

9d  Competing for titles in Edinburgh or Paris, say, does she feel homesick? (4,7)
{MISS ENGLAND} – this is a cryptic definition of a young lady who competes internationally but sounds as if she’s pining for her homeland.

13d  Having buttonholed you, she would ask for money (6,4)
{FLOWER GIRL} – cryptic definition of a young lady in the street who solicits money after she’s pinned something in your buttonhole.

16d  Acting rashly about male being unfaithful (8)
{CHEATING} – an anagram (rashly) of ACTING goes round a male pronoun.

17d  Raising pound sub is a misjudgement (7)
{BLUNDER} – reverse (raising) the abbreviation for a pound in weight and add a prefix meaning sub or below.

18d  Flavouring also, I perceive, permeates (7)
{ANISEED} – a conjunction meaning also with I (from the clue) and a verb to perceive or make out inside it (permeates).

21d  Later, maybe, will be up for Asian food (3,3)
{WON TON} – this small Chinese dumpling is the reversal (up) of a phrase meaning ‘later, perhaps’.

24d  Drop back pronouncedly in these rounds (4)
{LAPS} – these rounds on the track sound like (pronouncedly) a verb meaning to drop back or backslide.

The clues I liked best were 23a and 13d. How about you?


18 Comments

  1. BigBoab
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 1:30 pm | Permalink

    Not a toughie but a quite enjoyable crossword from Excalibur, my thanks to Gazza for the excellent review. ( I liked 13d and 9d best)

  2. Jezza
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 1:37 pm | Permalink

    Most of this went in without any problem, but i could not finish four in the NW segment. 7a, and 10a, i would never have got from the clues, although i should have worked out 1d, despite only having one checking letter! The other one i failed to get was 2d (without 7 and 10 i had nothing to go on). My first failure to complete a toughie for some time.
    Many thanks to Gazza for the explanations.

  3. crypticsue
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

    Same time as the backpager so not a toughie. I liked 10a as it took me back to my days as a barmaid in our local.

  4. JB
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 1:59 pm | Permalink

    7a was a typical “Toughie” clue. Guess the answer ( a priest exorcises ghosts etc) and then find something suitable that fits – simple!!

  5. michael mason
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 2:11 pm | Permalink

    I thoroughly enjoyed solving an Excalibur, as I always do. It left me with a smile on my face
    I wasn’t familiar with 10a but a colleague of mine who hails from Hampshire tells me it’s quite a favourite in his local

  6. Pegasus
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

    Gentle fare on offer today which I quite enjoyed, favourites were 10a 21d and 26a thanks to Excalibur and to Gazza for the comments.

  7. FRANK
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

    A rare occasion for me; I finished a Toughie without recourse to the hints! So Iwas surprised and delighted to see it awarded **, thought the most it would get would be *. Perhaps I’m improving. Fingers crossed for tomorrows effort! Many thanks to Excalibur and Gazza.

  8. crypticsue
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 4:43 pm | Permalink

    Kcit tomorrow

  9. Expat Chris
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 5:48 pm | Permalink

    It’s tricky Tuesday all around for me…quickie, crypic and this one all took some considerable time. But, like the other two, I did complete without hints although it would have helped to get 21D the right way up the first time. I, too liked 13D. Many thanks to Excalibur and Gazza.

    • Expat Chris
      Posted October 15, 2013 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

      I take that back. I did need hints for the cryptic. My brain is addled.

  10. Kath
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 5:59 pm | Permalink

    I enjoyed this but would never have got several answers without the hints.
    I still don’t see why a couplet is a minor triumph. I’ve looked in BRB – all I can think is that it sounds like ‘cuplet’ which, I suppose, could be a little cup but there’s nothing to indicate that it’s a homophone. Or is it a little coup – or shall I just shut up and stop being dim?
    I liked 25a and13d. My favourite was 21d.
    With thanks to Excalibur and gazza.

    • gazza
      Posted October 15, 2013 at 6:01 pm | Permalink

      Couplet could be a mini coup.

      • Kath
        Posted October 15, 2013 at 7:54 pm | Permalink

        But then it sounds wrong, doesn’t it? It only works when it’s written rather than spoken. Oh dear – REALLY dim today – ignore me!!

  11. 2Kiwis
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 7:23 pm | Permalink

    We needed a quick Google to confirm that 10a existed and apart from that, it all fell in to place rather quickly. Pleasant enough.
    Thanks Excalibur and Gazza.

  12. Miffypops
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 7:52 pm | Permalink

    Hello all, I am joining you by default today as I never thought I would have time for The Toughie but I kept looking and chipping away at it bit by bit whilst serving beer to mourners at a funeral wake. I needed help at 26ac and I do not think I could have got it in a million years without the comment from dear Kath above. However I love the clue and the answer. I have never heard of 10ac despite 44 years working with beer. Thanks to Excalibur and thanks to Gazza and Thanks to you all and thanks to my beautiful daughter Joni who is busy making me my first grandchild

    • Kath
      Posted October 15, 2013 at 7:58 pm | Permalink

      Well lucky old you with your beautiful daughter who is growing a grandchild – we have two beautiful daughters but, unless they’re hiding something really well, neither is growing a grandchild. I live in hope . . . .

  13. Only fools
    Posted October 15, 2013 at 11:04 pm | Permalink

    Favourite for me 9d in an enjoyable puzzle ,confess to a well aimed guess at 10a ,would not like to admit how long the back pager took in comparison but it was certainly a lot longer .
    Thanks to Gazza for the review and to Excalibur too and congrats to Miffypops shortly to be Miffygrandpops .

    • Miffypops
      Posted October 16, 2013 at 12:34 am | Permalink

      Thank you. I hope you see my thanks.