ST 2647 (Hints)

Sunday Telegraph Cryptic No 2647 (Hints)

Hints and tips by Big Dave

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

As is usual for the weekend prize crosswords, I will select a few of the more difficult clues and provide hints for them.

Don’t forget that you can give your assessment of the puzzle. Five stars if you thought it was great, one if you hated it, four, three or two if it was somewhere in between.

Could new readers please read the Welcome post before asking questions about the site.

Most of the terms used in these hints are explained in the Glossary and examples are available by clicking on the entry under “See also”.

A full review of this puzzle will be published after the closing date for submission

Across

1a           Opening part of cathedral, say, that’s not quite finished (6)
This opening or opportunity is derived by dropping (that’s not quite finished) the final L from a part of, say (for example), a cathedral

4a           Willing Duke’s prepared to be shot? (8)
This adjective meaning willing is derived from D(uke) IS (Duke’s) followed by a verb meaning prepared to be shot by a camera

17a         KLM pilot who’s, dramatically, unable to land? (6,8)
What could possibly describe a KLM pilot is actually a legendary ghost ship that can never land, doomed to sail the oceans forever

23a         What to do before lighting up kitchen appliance (7)
In the days before smoking was banned this, if split (5,2), was what one had to do, by raising one’s glass to the Queen,  before lighting up a cigarette – it’s actually a kitchen appliance

26a         They have two legs and fly (8)
… fly, in this context, is a noun!

27a         Tediously persist, creating a monster (6)
As (4,2) this is a phrasal verb meaning to tediously persist but it’s actually a monster

Down

1d           Do work for husband (8)
A charade of verbs meaning to do or cheat and to work for gives a different verb meaning to husband or manage economically

3d           Work of art college with typo? (7)
This work of art is a misspelling of college

9d           Lock of hair included by breaker of commandment in explanatory communication (8,6)
Put a lock of hair (7) inside a breaker of the 10th commandment (this agent noun is not in Chambers or the ODE) to get an explanatory communication

16d         Like service that’s held without any interruption (8)
A double definition – like a tennis service that is held and without any interruption

22d         Temperature, roughly, in part of body (5)
T(emperature) followed by two words (2,2) which mean roughly results in a part of the body

Iif you need further help then please ask and I will see what I can do.

As this is a Prize crossword, please don’t put whole or partial answers or alternative clues in your comment, else they may be censored!


Today it’s Happy Birthday to Robbie Keane (32) and Steve Lawrence (77)
Advertisements

39 Comments

  1. Scrabo
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    I thought this was a very enjoyable puzzle but it must be at a two star level because I was able to complete it unaided. So only the tennis to focus on this wet afternoon.

  2. mary
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 12:25 pm | Permalink

    Hi Dave Just popping in to say I really enjoyed todays puzzle, lots of favourites for me today, I am actually going to say a two star personally, which is very strange for me!! Funnily enough chatting to my brother afterwards he didn’t enjoy it at all! Off for most of the day now maybe back later, have a good day everyone, enjoy the sunshine whilst it lasts!

  3. crypticsue
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

    BPotW with knobs on. As Mary says 2* difficulty but definitely 5* fun. I liked 10a, 13a 17a, 26a, 3d, 9d and 16d (very appropriate for today) but the top favourite has to be 23a. Groan of the day came from Mr CS when I read out the clue for 26a and then told him the answer :D

    Thanks very much to Virgilius for a splendid start to a very muggy Sunday. Thanks to BD too.

    If anyone is sent to the Naughty Corner this afternoon, cake of the day is some experimental Chocolate Brownies with Fresh Raspberries in. Well, when one is picking between 5 and 9 lb of raspberries a day, one has to do something with them other than Jam.

  4. Colmce
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 12:43 pm | Permalink

    Yes another enjoyable Sunday puzzle, hints not needed so go along with 2* diff.

    Public thanks to BD for working on making the NTSPP/Prize puzzles easily accessible to iPad users.

  5. gnomethang
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 12:57 pm | Permalink

    Agreed on the above. Not hard but challenging enough and a really fun solve. THanks to Virgilius and to BD for the hints.

  6. Kath
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 12:57 pm | Permalink

    Oh dear!! It sounds, so far, as if I’m the only one who found this pretty difficult. I took ages to get started – only two answers having read all the across clues – a few more from the downs. I think I might just be suffering from “crossword overdose” – did yesterday’s cryptic, the prize puzzle (apart from two, which I still can’t do) AND the NTSPP. Finally finished this one and now realise that I enjoyed it very much. Would probably have been quicker to get 17a if I hadn’t thought that KLM was a Russian airline! :roll:
    My favourites include 10, 25 and 27a and 1, 3 and 22d. Best of all, for me, 26a – also my last one to get.
    With thanks to Virgilius and BD.
    I’m in the watching the tennis brigade – back later.

    • Roger
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 4:10 pm | Permalink

      No you;re not Kath….I took a long time to get started as well. Favourite clue 17

      • Kath
        Posted July 8, 2012 at 10:23 pm | Permalink

        Good – I’m glad I’m not on my own here!

  7. Jezza
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 1:02 pm | Permalink

    Super puzzle, and perfect for a weekend prize crossword!
    Thanks to Virgilius, and to BD

  8. Tantalus
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 1:16 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to BD (especially for not using the usual “lift and separate” imagery for the 22d picture hint). And, does anyone know the rotary instrument that BD uses for his icon/gravatar? Anyway – 77F here in Boston (MA), Tennis and Silverstone on VPN to the Beeb later.

    • Posted July 8, 2012 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

      It’s a Curta calculator. I have a Type I and a Type II – this is the later model:

      http://bigdave44.com/gallery/?album=1&gallery=3

      • Tantalus
        Posted July 8, 2012 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

        Thanks – are these the cranks that were used in car rally events in the 70s?

        • Posted July 8, 2012 at 2:24 pm | Permalink

          I believe so – but not by me!

    • Kath
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 7:55 pm | Permalink

      :sad: All Greek to me!! Probably stuff that my brain doesn’t need to be cluttered with!

  9. Wozza
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

    An excellent puzzle.

  10. Hrothgar
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    Great puzzle.
    Once you’ve got the 14 letter spine and the two 14 letter cross-laterals, the rest falls into place with a few chuckles on the way.
    Many thanks Virgillius and BD for the review.

  11. Posted July 8, 2012 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

    Quite gentle for a Sunday. Apart from 3d – not sure about this type of clue – I mean any clue could be a typo if you want to stretch it, anything can be a misspelling of owt! Anyway apart from that very enjoyable. Many Thanks.

  12. Vorkorsigan
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

    Not a bad one, only a couple made me wonder a bit as to why. But got it done before the F1, TDF, Tennis etc

  13. Addicted
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 8:41 pm | Permalink

    Ok, I confess – I can’t finish it despite the hints, which aren’t hinting the ones I need! I seem to be having a bad time lately with crosswords – partly due, I fear, to the fact that my electronic friend has packed up on me – there, I really have confessed!! Must replace it a.s.a.p to prevent this frustration, if nothing else. Any help with 2 & 6d, and 10 & 13a would be most gratefully appreciated. Thank you. Other than these complete blocks, I loved it – particularly 9 & 6d and 26a.

    • gazza
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:02 pm | Permalink

      2d Increase cut in shock evaluation exercise (9)
      The definition is evaluation exercise. Insert a verb meaning to increase without its final letter (cut) inside a verb meaning to shock or horrify.

      • Kath
        Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:20 pm | Permalink

        Beaten by time and expertise yet again- how you guys do this SO well completely defeats me – off to hang my head in shame! :sad: I did, at least, try!! :smile:

    • gazza
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:07 pm | Permalink

      6d Tall tree standing over yew, reportedly widespread (7)
      A tall tree surrounds (standing over) the letter that sounds like (reportedly) yew to make an adjective meaning widespread or prevalent.

    • gazza
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:10 pm | Permalink

      10a Here, what’s North-East? China (5)
      A country that has China to its North-East comes from the abbreviation for North-East followed by what a china is in rhyming slang.

    • gazza
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:13 pm | Permalink

      13a Sailor in his usual surroundings put back lots of maps (7)
      An informal word (4) for a sailor goes inside where you’d usually find said sailor. Now reverse (put back) the lot to get lots of maps.

    • Kath
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:16 pm | Permalink

      Hi Addicted – I think that everyone is licking their wounds after the Murray defeat at Wimbledon!
      2d – you want a word meaning an evaluation – often done annually and seems to cause a huge amount of angst and is something that your job depends on – have to confess that I really haven’t quite worked out the word play here!
      6d – widespread (and quite in vogue) – a tree that is tall around the homophone for “yew”.
      10a – this took me ages! somewhere (another country) which you get from the abbreviation for North East and the three letter word (cockney rhyming slang) for China.
      13a – the definition is lots of maps. One of the usual words for sailor – where would you expect a sailor to be – on the … perhaps! Reverse the lot and there you are!
      Hope that I haven’t transgressed any rules here!

  14. Addicted
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:17 pm | Permalink

    Thank you Gazza – sorry, I meant 8d (I did manage to solve 6d) – and 13a? I am obviously being VERY thick to-day. Apologies!

    • Kath
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:26 pm | Permalink

      Very quiet here – I’m now going to stick my neck out and say that I’m glad Federer won the Wimbledon Championship – I think that Murray has several years of winning ahead of him. Federer is older and so has less time ahead of him – he also looks like a decent human being – he has a gentle and kind face!

      • gnomethang
        Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:37 pm | Permalink

        Ditto that!. I put the contents of my Paddy Power account on a 3-1 to Federer.!

      • Kath
        Posted July 8, 2012 at 10:30 pm | Permalink

        Thanks gnomey and Jezza – feeling a bit lonely since no-one else seems to agree! Had promised myself that I was going to watch the final – an old neighbour of ours came round to ESCAPE her 96 year old mother wanting to watch the tennis – seemed a bit rude to say “Oh but ….. so ended up only watching the last couple of sets!

      • pommers
        Posted July 8, 2012 at 11:05 pm | Permalink

        With you there Kath! Roger is the best thing ever to have graced a tennis court and he proved that big time today! Besides that, Murray is Scottish, not British, by his own admission.

      • Franco
        Posted July 9, 2012 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

        Kath, you are not alone! Well done, Roger Federer! So much style and also a thoroughly nice bloke, by all accounts!

        (Just noticed that the Scotsman picked up a cheque for £575,000 – maybe they were tears of Joy?)

      • mary
        Posted July 9, 2012 at 2:31 pm | Permalink

        Personally I think the occasion is too big for Murray and he will never win it, this was his chance

    • Jezza
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:35 pm | Permalink

      Hi Kath

      I’m with you – well played Roger.

    • gazza
      Posted July 8, 2012 at 9:39 pm | Permalink

      8d Gradually understand significance of summary (6)
      Double definition – a verb to assimilate or gradually understand the significance of and also a summary or precis.

  15. pommers
    Posted July 8, 2012 at 11:12 pm | Permalink

    Loved 26a! What a d’oh when the penny dropped :grin: Was a bit tired when we finally got to do this after the MotoGP, F1, tennis and the Tour but it filled in a pre-prandial very nicely.

    Thanks to Virgilius for the usual great stuff and to BD as well.

  16. Weekend Wanda
    Posted July 9, 2012 at 8:53 am | Permalink

    Agree with Pommers about 26a. Also kicked
    myself when I got my last one in – 12a. I miss these nearly every time! NW corner last in for me and least favourite. 10a I’ve got but not absolutely sure why. Think it’s to do with rhyming slang but if so don’t really get the last 3 letters!

    • Posted July 9, 2012 at 9:08 am | Permalink

      My old china plate (mate) – No puzzle on the I Pad again this morning!

      If anyone can send it somehow – Would be grateful