Toughie 758

Toughie No 758 by Ozymandias

Nudge, Nudge: Wink, Wink!

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty ***Enjoyment ****

Greetings from the Calder Valley! As you are probably aware, there was a bit of a mix-up this morning with the puzzle previously inadvertently published a couple of weeks back being republished this morning on line and a different puzzle in the paper. However all is now sorted out and we have a pleasant puzzle by Ozymandias to tackle. I can confirm that our setter today is not the previously published setter that has used that name in the past.

A nice enjoyable puzzle, well suited to Friday, which kept me amused on a bus journey this morning, with a little tip of my hat to Crypticsue who helped me with a couple of stuckages. I am a bit concerned about one or two words used as anagram indicators that wouldn’t normally be so, but it’s a small point in a good puzzle.

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought. You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post. Favourite clues are highlighted in blue.

Across

1a Low rugby kick, dislodging head protection (6)
{RUBBER} We start today with an amusing clue. The name for a type of kick that occurs in Rugby Union becomes the name for a male protective when the first letter (g) is removed.

4a Middle-aged fellow Tory excited single mum (8)
{FORTYISH} A word that relates to being middle-aged is found by taking F (fellow), adding an anagram (excited) of TORY, the roman numeral for one (single) and what you say when asking someone to be quiet or keep mum.

9a Damage front of bedside lamp (6)
{BLIGHT} A word that means damage, particularly affecting plants or crops, is found by taking B (front of bedside) and adding a type of lamp.

10a Crucifix role — revolutionary exit for thespian? (4,4)
{TRAP DOOR} A way that an actor can suddenly leave a stage is an expression that when reversed means a crucifix (or measure of land), plus a role in a play.

12a Sort of undies placed around little guys initially. Pampers? (8)
{INDULGES} An anagram (sort of…) of the word UNDIES has LG (little guys initially) inside to give something that means pampers.

13a Annual fire, with one replacing backmost ancient manuscripts (6)
{PAPYRI} An abbreviation, often seen with salaries that refers to annual, is added to the name for a big bonfire, but with I instead of the last letter. This reveals the name for ancient Egyptian manuscripts.

15a Horrified, John denounced critic’s knowledge (5-8)
{PANIC-STRICKEN} An expression that means horrified or aghast, is revealed by taking a slang word for a toilet (John), adding an anagram (denounced) of CRITICS and a Scottish word for knowledge.

18a Consort, running in the race, heard father (9,4)
{CATHERINE PARR} One of six famous royal consorts is found by making an anagram of IN THE RACE and adding a homophone (heard) of a word meaning father.

22a Faulty line somewhere in the West Midlands (6)
{DUDLEY} A town in the West Midlands is made up of something that means faulty or broken, and adding a type of line associated with dowsing.

24a Rook to consume when covered in salt. Food for carnivores? (8)
{CREATURE} Inside a cookery term that means to cover in salt goes R (rook, in chess) plus a word meaning to consume. This will give you the name for something that a carnivore may well eat.

26a Bony thing exercised limb outside with energy (8)
{MANDIBLE} The name for the human jawbone is an anagram of LIMB around a conjunction meaning ‘with’ and adding E (for energy).

27a Bottom absent in model (6)
{SOFFIT} For me, the weakest clue here. I’m a bit baffled about the definition here. Chambers doesn’t actually use the word ‘bottom’ under this word, although it does give ‘underside’ which in this instance I don’t think is the same. A word meaning absent goes inside something meaning to act as a model.

28a Rock hanger-on, getting excited, is able to meet Queen (8)
{ABSEILER} Someone who hangs around rock faces is revealed by making an anagram of IS ABLE and adding the abbreviation for Her Maj.

29a Irons pullover son left out, containing mark (6)
{JEREMY} The first name of Mr Irons the actor is found by taking a word that means a pullover and swapping S (son) for M (mark).

Down

1d Polish state council’s inaugural rule of authority (6)
{RUBRIC} The name for an authoritarian diktat can be found by taking a word that means polish or clean, adding the abbreviation for the smallest of the American states, and adding R (inaugural, i.e. the first letter of RULE).

2d Problem for driver — pond is awkwardly placed in Sandwich? (5,4)
{BLIND SPOT} Something that can cause a problem for a driver is revealed by making an anagram of POND IS and placing it inside an abbreviation of a popular sandwich.

3d Level One swimming requires college assistance mostly (7)
{ECHELON} A word for a level is revealed by making an anagram (swimming) of ONE and inserting C (colleague) and three-quarters of a word that means assistance.

5d Monster therefore must be overthrown (4)
{OGRE} Reverse the Latin word for therefore to get the name for a troll or giant.

6d First given £1000, au pair regularly scrubbed palace (7)
{TOPKAPI} The name of the famous palace in Istanbul is revealed by taking a word meaning first or leading, adding K (£1000) and then the alternate letters need to removed (scrubbed) from AU PAIR and the residue added.

7d Like a Welshman making cream? (5)
{IVORY} If something resembles Brie, it is said to be cheesy. If something is like a Welshman it is said to be ….. , which is a word for the colour cream.

8d Classical lady showing hesitation in greeting somebody (8)
{HERMIONE} A woman’s name (Ms Grainger?) is made up of an expression used to indicate hesitation, place this inside a greeting and add a word for somebody.

11d Informal discussion leaves children up-to-date (5-2)
{TEACH-IN} The name for an education session is revealed by taking a word for a drink in leaf form, add an abbreviation for children and a short word meaning up-to-date or modern.

14d Hate avant-garde paintings deep down (2,5)
{AT-HEART} An anagram (avant-garde??) of HATE is added to a word for paintings to give an expression meaning deep down.

16d Fur pants, very loud in Leek, created commotion (9)
{KERFUFFLE} Something that means commotion is an anagram (pants) of FUR, add the musical notation abbreviation for play very loud, and place this inside an anagram (created) of LEEK. Bit convulted.

17d A rogue and accomplice finally end up getting life in an institution? (8)
{ACADEMIA} A word sum comprising A + a name for a bounder or rogue + E (last letter of accomplice) + something that means an end or a goal reversed. This gives you the word for the world of universities, colleges, etc.

19d Retirees from 17, heads of electronics industry, received special timer (7)
{EMERITI) The name for former professors found in 17 down is revealed by taking the first letters of Electronics and Industry and placing inside an anagram of TIMER.

20d Mariner separated shellfish (7)
{ABALONE} The name for a type of shellfish is found by taking the abbreviation for a sailor and adding a word meaning separated or solo.

21d Complex housed finals in modern art — an unknown number passed (4,2)
{WENT-BY} A word for a complex (think ‘O what a tangled….’) and insert NT (last letters of modern art) and add the abbreviation for an unknown constant in Maths. This gives an expression that means passed.

23d Couple of naturists exchanging beach highlights? (5)
{DUNES} Find a word that means naturists and swap the first two consonants to give things found on a beach.

25d Adversary stifled laughter, in principle — icy thing (4)
{FLOE} A word for an iceberg is found by taking something that means an enemy and placing inside L (the first letter of Laughter)

Thanks to our O setter for today’s challenge, very enjoyable.
Hope to see some of you at our gathering tomorrow if you can make it, and don’t miss tomorrow’s NTSPP puzzle if you are a Toughie fan!


The following message was sent to all Telegraph Puzzles subscribers:

Hello all, a quick note about Toughie 758.

Our ‘new’ compiler, Ozymandias, is in fact Osmosis.

You may remember that the Osmosis Toughie 758, which inadvertently appeared in the Telegraph newspaper on Tue April 10, was originally due to appear on Fri April 20. (After it appeared in the newspaper, we made it available online as GK 7588.)

So for April 20, it seemed appropriate to replace Osmosis’s original Toughie 758 with another Toughie by the same compiler.

But how would one tell the two Osmosis Toughie 758s apart?

Hence the slight tweak of byline, giving us an Osmosis Toughie 758 and an Ozymandias Toughie 758…

Hope that makes sense!

(Incidentally, the pseudonym Ozymandias has been used in the past by Jonathan Crowther, aka Azed of The Observer. It seemed too good not to have been used before! Apologies to Azed — we just borrowed it for a day.)

Thanks to Osmosis for a very enjoyable Ozymandias puzzle. Hope you enjoyed it.

All the best

Phil McNeill
Telegraph Crossword Editor

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14 Comments

  1. Jezza
    Posted April 20, 2012 at 5:34 pm | Permalink

    A cracker of a puzzle! I really enjoyed this one; 1a was a belter to start the puzzle off…. Many thanks to setter, and to Tilsit for the review.
    More of this please.

  2. gazza
    Posted April 20, 2012 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

    Very enjoyable with some smooth and witty clues (and educational – I found out that there’s no place in the West Midlands called DUFFEL). Perhaps a few too many anagrams and, like Tilsit, I thought that some of the indicators were strange (how does denounced work?).
    Thanks to Oxymandias and Tilsit.

  3. crypticsue
    Posted April 20, 2012 at 6:49 pm | Permalink

    I third the ‘enjoyable’ factor with this one. I knew knowing about 27a’s would come in handy one day! Thanks to Ozymandias for the crossword and to Tilsit for the explanations.

  4. johns
    Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:01 pm | Permalink

    I don’t quite agree with the explanation for 1d. Surely polish = rub, state is RI and council’s inaugural is ‘ c’ (not ‘r’). Anyway very nice puzzle – thanks Ozymandias and Tilsit for the review.

    • Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:07 pm | Permalink

      I agree with you re 1D.

    • Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:09 pm | Permalink

      Ditto on that – was just going to post when I saw Digby’s comment as well

      • Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:18 pm | Permalink

        Trying to rush and catch up. A Typo on my part. It was Rhode Island plus the first letter of Council – rule of authority was the definition.

        • Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:26 pm | Permalink

          I know only too well what you mean, Tilsit!
          Thanks to O8s and you for a fun experience!

        • Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:27 pm | Permalink

          …and one of my own typos in last week’s ST review was rather unfortunate too!

  5. Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:08 pm | Permalink

    I picked up the paper as I had printed off the last mix up puzzle (which was also fun). Enjoyed this so thanks to the setter and to Tilsit.

  6. pegasus
    Posted April 20, 2012 at 7:42 pm | Permalink

    Very pleasant experience. loved 1a all in all a good puzzle thanks to Ozymandias and to Tilsit for the comments.

  7. Kath
    Posted April 20, 2012 at 10:49 pm | Permalink

    I should have known better than to look on a Friday! :oops: However it was raining so why not?
    I did manage about a third of this one before I went running for help from the hints. Having read the hint for each I could do most of them, so thank you to Tilsit. I think that I’m not very well qualified to comment on much else but thank you to Ozymandias and, again, to Tilsit.
    If I don’t even try I’ll never learn!! :smile:

  8. Posted April 20, 2012 at 11:26 pm | Permalink

    Excellent stuff from what for me was a new setter – more please!
    Odd experience today though as I opened the Toughie and got the Osmosis from a couple of weeks ago. Solved that and then found it wouldn’t submit and then got the right puzzle so had two Toughies to do! Then the Puck in the Grauniad (tricky rascal) and then the DT back page – busy day :grin:

    Thanks to Ozymandias and Tilsit

  9. Phil McNeill
    Posted April 21, 2012 at 1:42 am | Permalink

    Hello all, a quick note about yesterday’s Toughie 758.

    Our ‘new’ compiler, Ozymandias, is in fact Osmosis.

    You may remember that the Osmosis Toughie 758, which inadvertently appeared in the Telegraph newspaper on Tue April 10, was originally due to appear on Fri April 20. (After it appeared in the newspaper, we made it available online as GK 7588.)

    So for April 20, it seemed appropriate to replace Osmosis’s original Toughie 758 with another Toughie by the same compiler.

    But how would one tell the two Osmosis Toughie 758s apart?

    Hence the slight tweak of byline, giving us an Osmosis Toughie 758 and an Ozymandias Toughie 758…

    Hope that makes sense!

    (Incidentally, the pseudonym Ozymandias has been used in the past by Jonathan Crowther, aka Azed of The Observer. It seemed too good not to have been used before! Apologies to Azed — we just borrowed it for a day.)

    Thanks to Osmosis for a very enjoyable Ozymandias puzzle and, on the compiler’s behalf, thank you to Tilsit and everyone else for the warm comments.

    All the best

    Phil McNeill
    Telegraph Crossword Editor