NTSPP – 092 (Review)

Not the Saturday Prize Puzzle – 092

Radler’s Risqué Puzzle

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Welcome back to Radler with a cheeky crossword whose theme was prophetically announced by Spindrift when commenting on today’s Daily Telegraph crossword.  This is a crossword with several double entendres alluded to by the answer to the long across clues as 11, 17 and 15 across (a brilliant anagram for the theme which fits perfectly within it).

Across

1a Set off hourly, do finish to fulfil obligation (11 17 15) (4,4,3,2)
{HOLD YOUR END UP} – A double entendre:  An anagram (set off) of (HOURLY DO) followed by a phrase meaning finish gives a phrase meaning fulfil an obligation.

8a Qualification for one having sex? (5)
{RIDER} – A qualification added to a contract could be (indicated by a question mark) a description of one having sex.

9a Clumsily built men go to bed (6,2)
{TUMBLE IN} – An anagram (clumsily) of BUILT MEN gives a phrase meaning go to bed.

10a A set piece of music with no start and without end (7)
{AGELONG} – A word meaning without end comes from a word sum of the A from the clue, a word meaning set and a word for music with the first letter removed (with no start).

11/17/15″Hot bodies” she titters as chap stutters punch line (4,3,7,2,3,6)
{SAID THE ACTRESS TO THE BISHOP} – A phrase that indicates a double entendre at the end of a joke (punch line) comes from an anagram (stutters) of HOT BODIES SHE TITTERS AS CHAP.

13a Stalk old woman and get conviction (5)
{DOGMA} – A word for conviction or belief comes from a word sum of a word meaning stalk (as in follow) and a word for an old woman.

15a See 11 across

17a See 11 across

20a Return of wind covered up ulcer (5)
{RUPIA} – A new word for me but with clear wordplay.  A word for an ulcer comes from reversing (return) a word for wind and putting it around (covered) UP.

21a Man crashing wild party getting treatment (7)
{THERAPY} – A word for treatment comes from a word for man inside (crashing) an anagram (wild) of PARTY.

23a Introduce something for the first time in Russian (11 17 15 ) (3,2,2)
{PUT IT IN} – A double entendre: A phrase meaning introduce something comes from an I (the first) and a T (time) inside the name of a famous Russian president.

25a Explain puzzle’s instruction? (11 17 15) (4,2,2)
{FILL ME IN} – A double entendre:  A phrase meaning explain also describes what you need to do with the grid in a crossword.

26a It’s father’s heart! Take pulse! (11 17 15) (5)
{THROB} – A double entendre clue:  A word for pulse comes from the centre letters (heart) of father followed by a word meaning take or steal.

27a Uproar about river scene matching set (6,7)
{DINNER SERVICE} – This matching set may be seen on a table.  It comes from a word meaning uproar followed by an anagram (about) of RIVER SCENE.

Down

1d Major artery in body part, with abstinence becomes rigid (11 17 15) (4,3,4)
{HARD AND FAST} – A double entendre.  A phrase meaning rigid comes from putting a description of a major road (major artery) inside part of the body (on the end of your arms) followed by a word for abstinence.

2d Order to stop (5)
{LODGE} – A double definition.  A word for an order (or club where men gather) also means to stop.

3d Tall order in the beer garden (4,2,3)
{YARD OF ALE} – A literal description of a beer garden might also describe a drink in a three foot glass that you might consume there.

4d Erect, firm and prickly (11 17 15 ) (7)
{UPTIGHT} – A word meaning prickly (temperamentally) comes from putting together words meaning erect and firm.

5d Semen, as produced in a body (2,5)
{EN MASSE} – A phrase meaning in a body is an anagram (produced) of SEMEN AS.

6d Location of Indian takeaway say? (5)
{DELHI} – A kind of takeaway food shop sounds like (say) this Indian city.

7d Right to partake in drinks and dance; it’s where impressions are formed (5,4)
{PRINT SHOP} – A place where impressions are made with paper and ink comes from putting an R (Right) inside a description of some drinks followed by a three letter word for a dance.

12d Could give a reason for bail and expel an unruly bunch (11)
{EXPLAINABLE} – A word meaning could give a reason for comes from an anagram (unruly bunch) of BAIL EXPEL AN.

14d Trail from bug on bottom (11 17 15) (3,6)
{GET BEHIND} – A word meaning trail comes from a word meaning bug (usually followed by at) and a word for bottom.

16d It might chafe one on right, slow down and roll over (9)
{IRRITATOR} – A word for a person who might chafe comes from an I (one) and R (right) followed by a musical instruction meaning slow down followed by a final word meaning a roll or list that is reversed.

18d Component of tubeless tyre needs source of synthetic rubber (7)
{STYRENE} – A word for a type of synthetic rubber is hidden inside (component of) tubeless tyre needs.

19d Succulent plants or trees (7)
{ORPINES} – A word for succulent plants comes from the OR in the clue followed by a word for some evergreen trees.

22d Dead gross ((?) 11 17 15) (3,2)
{ALL IN} – A possible double entendre.  A phrase meaning dead (as in exhausted) could also mean gross (as in everything included).

24d Trunks show up one’s balls (5)
{TORSI} – A word (in the plural) for trunks comes from reversing (show up) I’s (ones) and a word meaning balls (or rubbish).

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4 Comments

  1. crypticsue
    Posted November 12, 2011 at 5:03 pm | Permalink

    I used to struggle with a Radler NTSPP but am now pleased to say that they are much more fun to solve and I am not just talking about today’s cheeky one. Thanks to Prolixic for a nicely illustrated review too.

    Radler seems to have gone a bit quiet on the test solve requesting front – I hope I get another one from him soon.

  2. Carrie
    Posted November 12, 2011 at 5:26 pm | Permalink

    First time I’ve attempted the NTSPP and finding it fun but difficult.

  3. Posted November 12, 2011 at 10:41 pm | Permalink

    I thought I was going to say I didn’t like this puzzle because if you can’t crack 11/17/15 you’re a bit stuffed!
    It’s a trick Araucaria and Paul use in the Grauniad sometimes and I’m not usually impressed as I like straight puzzles!
    However I found I did really enjoy this one, once the proverbial had dropped, so thanks to Radler for the brain stretch – it did take some effort but it proved worth it!
    Also thanks Prolixic – the illustration for the aforementioned 11/17/15 just hits the spot!

  4. Radler
    Posted November 13, 2011 at 10:05 am | Permalink

    Thank you to Prolixic for his, as always, well written and amusingly illustrated review, and to others for their comments.
    To anyone thinking of attempting the puzzle, please don’t hesitate because of the apparent references to (11 17 15). You can simply ignore those, and all the clues are independent and complete.