ST 2598 (Hints)

Sunday Telegraph Cryptic No 2598 (Hints)

Hints and tips by Big Dave

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As is usual for the weekend prize crosswords, I will select a few of the better clues and provide hints for them.

Don’t forget that you can give your assessment of the puzzle. Five stars if you thought it was great, one if you hated it, four, three or two if it was somewhere in between.

Could new readers please read the Welcome post before asking questions about the site.

Most of the terms used in these hints are explained in the Glossary and examples are available by clicking on the entry under “See also”.

A full review of this puzzle will be published after the closing date for submissions.

Across

1a           A rash paper upset state, in other words (10)
It’s always nice to have an anagram to start off – upset state indicates that A RASH PAPER needs to be reorganised to get a verb meaning to put in other words

6a           Drivers aim to avoid this horse-drawn vehicle (4)
A double definition; golfers aim to avoid finishing in this when driving and a horse-drawn vehicle

15a         A part of our navy engaged in carrying soldiers and resources for war (8)
Combine A, from the clue, a part of the navy (2) and a word meaning engaged in (2) and put them around some soldiers to get some resources for fighting  a war

22a         Opening statement for meeting after PM arrives (4,9)
What one says when meeting someone after the start of pm, as opposed to am

27a         In middle of a decade, second time it’s extremely dry (10)
Start with a particular decade and then insert S(econd) and add T(ime) to get an adjective meaning  extremely dry or parched

Down

1d           Perform song with piano as form of entertainment (4)
There are three parts to this clue: a verb meaning to perform, a song preceded by P(iano) and a form of entertainment

3d           Under pressure, foolishly arrest action, hence delay (13)
After (under in a down clue) P(ressure) put an anagram (foolishly) of ARREST ACTION to get the thief of time

8d           One who takes the lead, initially (with due respect to me?) (10)
A runner who takes the lead at the start of a race is a charade of a Latin word meaning with due respect to and me, as in the compiler of this puzzle

20d         Not too hard to defend with one incompetent in football team? (7)
An adjective meaning capable of being defended, if split (3,4) describes those in a football team excluding one who is incompetent

23d         Jester hiding king’s document from court (4)
Start with a jester and then insert the abbreviation of the Latin for king to get a court document


If you need further help then please ask and I will see what I can do.

As this is a Prize crossword, please don’t put whole or partial answers or alternative clues in your comment, else they may be censored!


Today it’s Happy Birthday to Jennifer Lopez (42) and Linda Carter (60)


26 Comments

  1. upthecreek
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 10:34 am | Permalink

    Nice and easy today as is usual on a Sunday. Best were 12 and 22 but no laughs at all. Should fill the postbag.

  2. Posted July 24, 2011 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    This was certainly the most straightforward Sunday puzzle for some time looking at my solving time. This should make people happy although I always look forward to a slightly harder Sunday myself.
    Many thanks to Virgilius and to BD.

  3. crypticsue
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:03 am | Permalink

    Although I came out at an average solving time for a Virgilius, I found the r/h side of the puzzle particularly difficult to finish off and certainly wouldn’t have called it his most straightforward crossword. I think I enjoyed myself overall – I’ll decide on enjoyment level when I have sorted out the review. Thanks to Virgilius and BD

  4. Jezza
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:11 am | Permalink

    I’m with crypticsue on the r/h side of the puzzle. I had 5 left in that area that took me as long to solve as the rest of the puzzle.
    Favourite clue 12a, least favourite clue 19a.
    Thanks to Virgilius, and to BD.

  5. Derek
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:21 am | Permalink

    Rather straightforward puzzle from Virgilius this Sunday.
    Somewhat loaded with anagrams.
    Don’t get 24a.

    • Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:23 am | Permalink

      Put a D in front of your answer, Derek!

      • Derek
        Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:38 am | Permalink

        Thanks Dave – you posted me while I was replying!
        My dictionaries and cheat books and Franklin down here are all dilapidated – a bit like myself!!

        We have had a violent Mistral these last few days – it comes round the corner from the Rhone delta to us in the Var.
        Clears away the clouds.

    • Derek
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:28 am | Permalink

      Got It at last!!

    • Nick
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:32 am | Permalink

      The British Statesman has had his lead (letter) removed…

      (Hope that’s OK)

      • Nick
        Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:33 am | Permalink

        too slow!

  6. Nick
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 11:31 am | Permalink

    It was a very nice puzzle, but I didn’t notice it being especially straightforward. Maybe that’s just me, I can live with it.

    Hadn’t seen the last three letters of 1d used like that before.

    I liked 8d best.

    Enjoy the Sunday everyone. Thank you to the Setter and Big Dave.

    Nick

    • crypticsue
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 12:23 pm | Permalink

      Add the last three letters of 1d to your list of ‘words that will appear in cryptics again and again’ :)

  7. pommers
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 12:38 pm | Permalink

    Don’t know why but I struggled with this one! Looking at the answers now it seems fairly straightforward but I just wasn’t on the wavelength today.
    Favourite 13d.
    Thanks to Virgilius and BD.
    Off to watch the Grand Prix now, enjoy your Sunday everyone.

    • Dickiedot
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 1:24 pm | Permalink

      I’m with you Pommers on this one. I found it difficult and needed all Dave’s help, must be on the wrong wavelength today. Thanks BD and Virgilius

  8. Prolixic
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 12:54 pm | Permalink

    I found this straightforwad but not as spectacular as some of Virgilius’s crosswords. I would say it was about his standard level of difficulty. If you want an easy crossword try this Sunday’s Everyman in the Observer. After my first run through, I had all but three clues solved.

    Many thanks to our setter and to BD for the notes.

  9. Kate
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 2:05 pm | Permalink

    I’m with CS on this one. I found it tough, particularly the bottom right hand corner and I needed BD’s help with 27a and a crossword dictionary’s with 21d which I hadn’t heard of before. Good mental exercise for a Sunday. Thanks BD and the setter.

  10. crypticsue
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 2:27 pm | Permalink

    Can someone who has done the newspaper version of this crossword tell me whether 18d is shown as 3, 4 as in the online version or 3-4 (which is what I think and Chambers confirms the numeration should be? Many thanks.

    • Franco
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 3:01 pm | Permalink

      18d – My edition of the Paper gives (3,4).

      • crypticsue
        Posted July 24, 2011 at 3:07 pm | Permalink

        Thank you. Chambers the Red Book has 3-4, Chambers on line has 3,4. Mysteriouser and mysteriouser, said Alice (and Crypticsue too) :)

  11. Kath
    Posted July 24, 2011 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

    I’m with anyone who found this quite difficult but have finished now without needing hints – I enjoyed it but it’s taken me a long time. I have to keep remembering that before I found this great blog I didn’t even attempt the Sunday puzzle – it was SO far beyond me that it wasn’t worth even having a look! :grin: 12a took me much too long – in fact, having got alternate letters in the first word, I thought that I must have got something wrong as it all looked so unlikely – then the penny dropped. Lots of good clues, I thought – 14, 25 and 27a and 3, 13, 16 and 20d. Best of all 22a. Thanks to Virgilius and Big Dave. Hope that the sun is shining for everyone today – it certainly is in Oxford.

    • Franco
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 3:46 pm | Permalink

      I, also, found this quite difficult (but for once finished without hints). The Sunday puzzle is still my favourite of the week – today, so many great surface readings.

      • mary
        Posted July 24, 2011 at 4:48 pm | Permalink

        Me too, although I didn’t start it til this afternoon and must admit to having got so fed up with 19a I am just giving up! I found it a crossword of two halves the left hand side was quite straightforward but the right side took me at least twice as long, fav clues 22a and 24a , thanks for hints Dave needed a coupe of them today :-)

        • Franco
          Posted July 24, 2011 at 5:12 pm | Permalink

          19a – Don’t give up!! Proceedeth?

          • mary
            Posted July 24, 2011 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

            Thanks Franco but I’m not sure I can :-D, I have some letters in the spaces which proceedeth could loosely indicate so I’ll stick with those

    • mary
      Posted July 24, 2011 at 4:49 pm | Permalink

      It is very warm here today Kath but not so sunny :-(

  12. Qix
    Posted July 25, 2011 at 1:16 am | Permalink

    Like gnomethang, I found this one of the least troublesome Sunday puzzles for some time. Unfortunately, a very dodgy wi-fi connection in the Canary Islands meant that I couldn’t confirm that my solution was correct. Similarly, Monday’s Rufus is quite possibly the easiest Telegraph cryptic that I can remember, although it took longer to submit the solution than it did to solve.

    I know that I shouldn’t post about Monday’s puzzle here, but the contention ratio on this connection is akin to the queue for membership of the MCC, so I may not be able to post again for a bit.