DT 26450 (Hints)

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 26450 (Hints)

Big Dave’s Saturday Crossword Club

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As is usual for the weekend prize crosswords, I will select a few of the better clues and provide hints for them.

Don’t forget that you can give your assessment of the puzzle. Five stars if you thought it was great, one if you hated it, four, three or two if it was somewhere in between.

Could new readers please read the Welcome post before asking questions about the site.

A full review of this puzzle will be published after the closing date for submissions.

Across

1a    Frost deposit — degrees start falling (4)
This type of frost, formed by the freezing of dew, is derived by dropping (falling) the final D (Degrees start) from a word meaning to deposit or stockpile

9a    I name dishonest person said to be at outcrop (6)
A charade of I, N(ame) and a word that sounds like a dishonest person (one who tells stories!) gives an outcrop of older rock surrounded by younger

22a    New place in green for bird (9,6)
An anagram (new) of PLACE IN GREEN FOR gives this bird of prey

25a    Overpriced honey? (4)
A double definition – expensive and a term of affection

Down

1d    Blockbuster rehung ‘mid confusion (9)
This blockbuster is an anagram (confusion) of REHUNG MID

6d    Lady has name of aristocrat (9)
A lady’s name is followed by N(ame) to get a member of a long-established noble family

18d    An editorial? Either (7)
Either is indicating that each of the first two words defines the answer (the first word is a definition by example, hence the question mark)

20d    Of the ear or of the mouth, we hear (5)
An adjective that means of the ear sounds like (we hear) one meaning of the mouth

The Crossword Club is now open! Feel free to leave comments.

Please don’t put whole or partial answers or alternative clues in your comment, else they may be censored!

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120 Comments

  1. Barrie
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    Super Saturday puzzle, finished it without recourse to the hints (but much thanks as always to BD). Best clue for me was 17a (it was how Baron Rothschild described his priceless collection of art). Never heard of 23a being associated with quails before but the dictionary confirms that it is!! Really enjoyed todays :-)

  2. tilly
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:02 am | Permalink

    Nice crossword, but am having a 13d day! Daughter in law in labour and I need HELP. Whilst waiting for NTSPP to go online any ideas for other puzzles i can do to take my mind off things?!? Thanks.

    • Spindrift
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:09 am | Permalink

      You could always go on the Telegraph Puzzles site & print off old crosswords you’ve not done before. Just a thought.

      Alternatively get hold of a copy of “The Week” magazine as its crossword is consistently at the “Toughie” end of the difficulty/entertainment spectrum. (and No, I do not have any connection with the publisher of said organ!)

      • tilly
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:16 am | Permalink

        Thanks – am a newspaper puzzle person, but agree it would have helped if I could access the site. Maybe Mr T will go to the newsagents for me … that will give him something to do!

        • mary
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:21 am | Permalink

          hope all goes well Tilly :)

          • tilly
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:22 am | Permalink

            Thanks, Mary. Are you pleased that King Kenny is back?

            • mary
              Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:38 am | Permalink

              The jury is out on that one Tilly we will have to wait to see, not a good start last week!

              • Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:12 pm | Permalink

                Like you, Mary, I’m not sure whether KD can turn around Liverpool’s fortunes and he may well be merely holding the fort until the summer… I’m sure that more exciting things are happening at White Hart Lane – I don’t mean Beckham – and I’ve no doubt that BD is in his element! As far as the crossword is concerned, I just found it to be standard fare for a Saturday and there weren’t any ‘Eureka!’ moments

                • Barrie
                  Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:35 pm | Permalink

                  Well tomorrow will certainly be exciting at the Lane!! Never mind King Kenny, as far as we are concerned it is Emperor Harry, hands off England!! :-)

    • Prolixic
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:22 am | Permalink

      Help is on its way. Check your e-mail :).

      • tilly
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:34 am | Permalink

        Many thanks.

        • mary
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:39 am | Permalink

          Aw isn’t everybody really nice on this site

          • tilly
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:44 pm | Permalink

            Totally agree!

  3. mary
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:06 am | Permalink

    Morning Dave, although I enjoyed this puzzle there were a couple of words I did not know, 11a & 9a, the bottom L/H corner took me longest although 22a was first to go in, in 23a should that only work in a down clue? Had to use the books to check out a few things but otherwise not too bad today :) fav clues 18d, 13a and 25a

  4. Prolixic
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:25 am | Permalink

    A nice gentle Saturday puzzle. Many thanks to Cephas for the crossword and to BD for the hints.

  5. rupe
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:28 am | Permalink

    First in 3A, last in 2D, generally pretty hard work.

    Don’t understand 3D or 21A.

    14D raised the biggest smile.

    • Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:49 am | Permalink

      Welcome to the blog Rupe

      3d Salts, a large order from David’s son (7)
      A charade of some sailors (3), A, L(arge) and an order awarded for eminence gives a son of David

      21a Made fun of nurse put out (4,2)
      A phrasal verb meaning made fun of is a State Enrolled Nurse followed by an anagram (out) of PUT

      • rupe
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:47 pm | Permalink

        Thanks Dave and Mary – lots more wordplay crammed into those few letters than I was looking for. Will file the nurse info away for future reference.

        Belated thanks to all for over a year of pleasure from your excellent site – I’ve been here almost daily since my wife got me Colin Dexter’s how to do the crossword book last Christmas.

      • steph
        Posted January 16, 2011 at 12:39 pm | Permalink

        Help I don’t understand 8a or 3d or 9a

        • Posted January 16, 2011 at 12:48 pm | Permalink

          As far as 3d is concerned I can add little to what I put earlier in this thread. Take the usual two-letter abbreviation for a sailor and make it plural, then add A, L(arge) and the order.

          8a – see Mary’s comment at #17

          9a – the last part sound like the word I deleted from your comment. Alternatively, just hover over the picture under the hint.

          • steph
            Posted January 16, 2011 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

            Thank you – sorry that word slipped in – not intentional

            • Posted January 16, 2011 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

              It’s easily done – it’s ok for weekday puzzles!

      • K
        Posted January 17, 2011 at 8:38 pm | Permalink

        It was driving me mad as I had the answer for 3d but could not work out why so thanks a million.

        • gazza
          Posted January 17, 2011 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

          Hi K – welcome to the blog.

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:50 am | Permalink

      Hi Rupe

      21a – is a three letter abbreviation for nurse with an angram of put inicated by ‘out’ at the end

      • mary
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:52 am | Permalink

        Ooh didn’t know that was allowed Dave, will you have to delete yourself :-D

        • Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:54 am | Permalink

          I did think twice, but decided to allow myself as it’s not a term that is familiar to everybody

          • Spindrift
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:04 pm | Permalink

            I am married to one!

            • Wayne
              Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

              Snap.

  6. Rod Ash
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:38 am | Permalink

    Hello everyone, another good puzzle as far as I’m concerned. It took me about an hour to complete and I needed to check in the bible which of David’s many son’s was involved! I liked 13a, 24a, 3d, 6d and 14d best. Whilst the answer to 16d is obvious with all the across letters in place I don’t understand beyond including allowed…how does the “two 18s” fit? Thanks

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:41 am | Permalink

      two of the answer at 18d Rod surround the word you understand

      • mary
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:41 am | Permalink

        one is 1 letter the other three

    • Prolixic
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:42 am | Permalink

      Two words that are 18 downs form part of the answer.

    • Rod Ash
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:46 am | Permalink

      Ok thanks I see now

  7. crypticsue
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:47 am | Permalink

    Lovely stuff. Didn’t take long to solve, can enjoy it all again later while typing the review, and Barrie’s happy too. Now if only the weather would cheer up!

  8. toadson
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:53 am | Permalink

    Done, but also wondered about the relevance of the two ’18s’. Have put the answer in now! Have a good weekend all.

  9. mary
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 11:57 am | Permalink

    Lovely picture of 22a Dave, is it taken from the one on the right?

  10. Lea
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

    Enjoyed that – did it in good time even though my brain stuck on 18d for a while – liked it when I got it.

    Wind is very strong here but mild – going to do the NTSPP in a while as I see it is by Prolixic and I really enjoy his.

    Have a good weekend everyone.

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

      they are too clever for me Lea, horrible day here too, think I’ll try and work on this weeks COW word, not an easy one!!

      • Lea
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:21 pm | Permalink

        You do well with your COW clues whereas my brain doesn’t register them easily so it’s back to what suits one doesn’t suit another.

        Wind has really got up – friend came to visit so havcen’t downloaded the NTSPP yet – later.

        Good luck with COW

        • mary
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

          I find making up clues on COW (more often than not unsuccessfully) a good way of understanding the cryptic way of thinking Lea, I find it helps a lot, however this weeks word has really got me stumped right now!

          • Lea
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:29 pm | Permalink

            OK – now I will have to go look at it.

  11. Geoff
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    Just one I don’t understand, 23a – that’s assuming the track of 12d is the type the trains run on. If someone can assist please then I can get on with what I should be doing, some practice for a concert this evening.

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:16 pm | Permalink

      Hi Geoff 23a, both sides of valley indicates the two end letters of the word, put be in front (on) of this and you get your answer, you get a **** of quails and larks I think, I think maybe this should be a down clue??

      • mary
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:17 pm | Permalink

        Now go practice and well done :)

      • Geoff
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:23 pm | Permalink

        So obvious! Thanks Mary. Collective nouns can so interesting at times.

        • Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:27 pm | Permalink

          I have been preparing this page for The Mine and would welcome any opinions – 23a is in there!

          http://bigdave44.com/the-mine/animals/

          • mary
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

            That is a very detailed list Dave, it must have taken you some time, I am very impressed, it is excellent IMHO, thank you :)

            • mary
              Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:36 pm | Permalink

              interesting to see that the dog can make a greater variety of sounds that most other animals

          • tilly
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:46 pm | Permalink

            Excellent addition to The Mine.

          • Geoff
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:50 pm | Permalink

            I do like the ambush of tigers! A group of us at Exam Schools came up with a ‘watch of invigilators’ …

            • Posted January 15, 2011 at 12:54 pm | Permalink

              I’ve deliberately avoided collective nouns for people – the list is never-ending!

          • Lea
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

            Dave

            What a fantastic addition that will make to The MIne – excellent.

            I presume if anyone finds additions you would welcome input. For example didn’t we have gazelle for antelope this week?

            • Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:39 pm | Permalink

              I need to put a few finishing touches to the list, and would welcome any additions / corrections. I have limited it to animals that have one or more entries in the other columns. If I start adding all known animals with alternate names as well then it will never be finished!

              • Lea
                Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

                Agreed – think it is a marvellous one. Will see if there is anything I can add/comment on but I am sure you have it well covered.

                Thank you.

              • Franny
                Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:17 pm | Permalink

                Yes, thanks very much BD. I seem to remember 23a as the collective noun for schoolgirls. And I was once told that a number of jellyfish was a ‘cuddle’ — most uncomfortable if you think of it. And a group of pelicans I think should be called a clatter. In case you’d like to add these to your list.
                :-)

          • PJ
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

            What a wonderful list! The book we used to recommend was Angus MacIver’s “The New First Aid in English”. But not even he has a battery of barracudas!

  12. brendam
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:16 pm | Permalink

    Great Xword today! Really enjoyable ! Too many good clues to pick a favourite. Had to look up 9a, never heard of it before, so that’s one to add to the list of new words, proves that even an 85yr old voracious reader can learn something new every day!! Many thanks to compiler and B.D.

  13. Little Dave
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    I think this is not a Cephas puzzle – I may be wrong and would appreciate some other views. Took me a while to get started – fairly mundane crossword really and not a lot to enthuse about.

    • Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

      If I had to gamble I would say that it is more like Cephas than last week’s. Perhaps someone will enlighten us, although recent pleas have been in vain.

  14. tilly
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:26 pm | Permalink

    Delighted to say we have a new little grandson. Crosswords will have to wait for a while …

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:32 pm | Permalink

      Congratulations Tilly, hope all is well, does he have a name yet??

    • Lea
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:34 pm | Permalink

      Congratulations Tilly – hope family are well.

    • tilly
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:40 pm | Permalink

      All well, thanks. Will let you know name when we have been told!!!

    • Jezza
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:27 pm | Permalink

      Congratualtions Tilly – excellent news.

    • Franny
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:19 pm | Permalink

      Yes, congratulations Tilly — little grandsons are Very Good Things. May he bring you much joy. :-)

  15. Little Dave
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

    Congratulations from Hertfordshire as well, Tilly.

    • tilly
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 1:41 pm | Permalink

      Thanks – this is a Watford baby!

  16. tilly
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:00 pm | Permalink

    OK I need the urgent help of a Biology teacher for my son! For the first half an hour he thought he had a son. He has just phoned back to tell us that he mistook the umbilical cord and we really have a granddaughter! SHE is very well!!!

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

      That is so funny Tilly :-D Oh dear, was he still happy??

    • Prolixic
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:08 pm | Permalink

      Classic! The services of an optician might be better!

    • tilly
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:19 pm | Permalink

      They were delighted. But it has caused hysterics amongst family and friends!!

      • mary
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

        never to be forgotten :) maybe the name will reflect the situation?

        • tilly
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:29 pm | Permalink

          She is Matilda and is a sister for Archie.

      • Lea
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:25 pm | Permalink

        That is the funniest tale of a new born have heard. My daughter-in-l;aw is expecting my second grandchild in May – will be telling my son this story!!!

      • Claire
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:15 pm | Permalink

        Congratulations Tilly!! I’ve 4 grandsons – no granddaughter yet but I’m still hoping. Your story made me laugh – very red face for your son then!! Is she named after you?

        • tilly
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:34 pm | Permalink

          Just noticed this. Nice thought Claire. The connection never occurred to me. Tilly is my blog name and nothing like my actual name.

    • Franny
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:21 pm | Permalink

      That reminds me of a letter I read in today’s Telegraph from a man who thought he had a male budgie until it laid an egg!

      Welcome, Matilda! :-)

  17. cephas
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

    It is Cephas today. Thanks for the many kind comments

    • Crystal
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:17 pm | Permalink

      Congrats to Tilly and to Cephas! After last week this was a joy, but need help please for the very long 8 across. Feel I’ve missed something really obvious!

      • mary
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:22 pm | Permalink

        Hi Crystal for 8a you need an anagram of springtime (exceptional) with a word for cover as in bury inside it to give you a word for explaining wrongly, at first I thought the wronglt indicted an anagram of ‘cover’ but it doesn’t it is part of the definition

        • Crystal
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

          Thanks Mary – that’s exactly where I was going wrong!

          • mary
            Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

            took me a while too :)

  18. Little Dave
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:17 pm | Permalink

    Tilly – you have created a lot of mirth in this household! I definately have two boys.

  19. Jezza
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:32 pm | Permalink

    Thanks to Cephas for an enjoyable, and less taxing puzzle than last Saturday.
    In my hurry to write the answers in, I had the first letter to 11a incorrect – Fortunately I saw my mistake with the obvious anagram in 1d.

    • Franny
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:23 pm | Permalink

      Yes, I wasn’t too sure how to spell it either.

  20. Spindrift
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:36 pm | Permalink

    Tilly – Felicitations to you & your family. If it’s any consolation the midwife at my youngest son’s birth made the same mistake and told us we had a daughter. 25 years later I know I definitely have a son

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

      It took 25yrs to find out Spindrift!? :-D

      • Spindrift
        Posted January 16, 2011 at 9:08 am | Permalink

        It was the beard that finally clinched it for me…

  21. Wayne
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 2:56 pm | Permalink

    Most enjoyable prize crossword, had to look up 9a can’t recall seeing that word before. Several favourite clues.
    As a matter of interest any interpretations for the pun on the ‘Quickie’, I can only interpret it as a comedy duo.
    Thanx to Compiler and BD.

    • Libellule
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:09 pm | Permalink

      Its the “comedy” duo, although the word comedy is pushing it a bit :-)

      • mary
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:13 pm | Permalink

        Hello Libellule, don’t often see you on Saturday afternoon :)

        • Libellule
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:29 pm | Permalink

          Mary,
          I always read the blog, but am usually too slow to be able to offer hints…

      • Wayne
        Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:18 pm | Permalink

        Glad someone else thinks along the same lines as me,i.e questioning the ‘comedy’ element.

        • Franco
          Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:56 pm | Permalink

          They always me laugh – or am I thinking of Cannon & Ball?

          Definite theme in the Quickie today – “Enlarge great, small, skinny middleweight !”

  22. RachQ
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:35 pm | Permalink

    I enjoyed today’s puzzle and learned a couple of new words – 9a and 11a, and had to check up on the answer to 23a. I actually managed it without looking at any of the hints here too, which made me rather chuffed!

    How do the first 3 letters of 7 down relate to ‘study’? Can you tell I’m quite new at this game?!

    Congratulations to Tilly on the birth of your grandson/daughter! A lovely name, Matilda.

    • Nik
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

      It’s an obscure meaning of the three-letter word – a transitive verb meaning to study/examine something. Never encountered it outside of crosswords, where it comes up a fair bit.

    • mary
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:01 pm | Permalink

      Hi RachQ other than it is an accepted abbreviation for study I’m not sure, mabe dave will explain, well done on completing without hints :)

    • crypticsue
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:03 pm | Permalink

      When you have done more of these crosswords you will find that study in a cryptic clue either means the first three letters of 7 down or it will be a ‘den’. If I had a £1 for every time one of them had been in a cryptic crossword….. :)

      Congratulations to Tilly and family too – my husband found the need for a biology teacher hysterical.

  23. Hangman1009
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Rattled through that today ! Most enjoyable. Had to look up meanings of 9a 11a and 23a though …. thanks to bd and cephas and congrats to tilly and family. I laughed so hard I cried.

  24. Claire
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:09 pm | Permalink

    Great workout today and achievable for a confirmed CC member but needed hints to understand 1a, 16d and 18d – actuallt not sure I have 18d right as I don’t understand it even with the hint! Thanks BD :-) . How’s it going Tilly?

    • Posted January 15, 2011 at 4:16 pm | Permalink

      Sorted out your “surplus” comments!

      “An” is an example of this type of word – two others are involved in the wordplay for 16d. An editorial in a newspaper could also be so described.

    • tilly
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:00 pm | Permalink

      All going well, thanks, Claire. You have probably seen the ‘mix up’ detailed on this blog. Off to see the baby later this evening, but have already seen her pic on the internet!

      • Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:44 pm | Permalink

        Many congratulations to your son and daughter-in-law, Tilly. If your son ever starts to take himself too seriously, you can remind him of today…

  25. Franny
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

    What with visiting daughters and small (but definite) grandson I’ve had to do this puzzle in installments, however I’ve managed without too much trouble, and enjoyed it. Started off by putting in the wrong one of David’s sons and being unsure of the spelling of 11a but I got there in the end. Never heard of 9a, so thanks for your help there BD. Lots of good clues and I liked the anagrams, but I suppose I’d say my favourites were 1d and 17a. Is that really what Rothschild called his collection, Barrie?
    :-)

  26. mikef
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 6:26 pm | Permalink

    I thoroughly enjoyed this crossword and it’s a long time since I completed one without resorting to the hints. Whooppee!

    Many congrats to Tilly et al.

  27. brendam
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 6:30 pm | Permalink

    Only just caught up on the blog– Tilly, congrats on the birth of Matilda– hope everyone is happy after the mix-up! I have 3 granddaughters and lovely they all are, enjoy!

  28. kate.cricket
    Posted January 15, 2011 at 7:49 pm | Permalink

    Geoff, I love your name for invigilators (see post no 11 onward). I shall relay that one at school on Monday especially as we are in the throes of exams.
    I have been racking my brain to think of a collective noun for Learning Support Assistants (Teaching Assistant in a secondary school).

    Can anyone think of a suitable one? I can only come up with ‘a diiferentiaton of…’ but that sounds pompous and it would be nice if our charges could relate to it too.

    Perhaps Tilly’s new grandaughter – Matilda, could be nicknamed Tilly Willy!

    • Posted January 15, 2011 at 8:16 pm | Permalink

      How about a Waste of Learning Support Assistants!

      Just joking. :roll:

    • Franco
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 8:40 pm | Permalink

      With all the cutbacks in education spending (and also their failure to turn up)?

      An “Absence” of Learning Support Assistants! :smile:

    • Prolixic
      Posted January 15, 2011 at 8:47 pm | Permalink

      Given the role that you play I suggest a necessity of learning support assistants.

      • Claire
        Posted January 17, 2011 at 6:18 pm | Permalink

        This gets my vote!!

  29. Derek
    Posted January 16, 2011 at 9:16 am | Permalink

    Enjoyable puzzle – I forgot to comment yesterday!
    I liked 15a & 3d best.

  30. Weekend Wanda
    Posted January 16, 2011 at 11:18 am | Permalink

    Interesting puzzle. Kept me busy quite a time – only started this morning. Ia was obvious but I missed the explanation – Clever. I liked 14 down. Don’t particularly like long anagrams like 22a. Hick is not a word we use in my part of the country so had to look that up! Got rather stuck on 2d as could not get Epsom salts out of my head. Nice clue when I worked it out. Also got stuck on 15a although ought not to have been a problem. Thinking 3d ended in a K did not help! So I was following some red herrings. Final humiliation – last was to go in was 21a. Knew what I was looking for – but just could not find it! I do not agree with all the comments about last week’s. It was certainly different but utilized different parts of the brain! Hope there will be some more……………..

  31. Flintelliejet
    Posted January 16, 2011 at 11:29 am | Permalink

    Really enjoyed this one. Soooooooo much nicer than last week’s.
    It’s good to see everyone’s comments and banter over the weekend
    Thanks BD for confirming my guesses are sometimes right!

  32. Peter
    Posted January 16, 2011 at 6:14 pm | Permalink

    I found this very difficult.

    Only half done even after reading this far.

  33. David S
    Posted January 17, 2011 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

    Stuck on 8a. Last to go in. Help!

    • gazza
      Posted January 17, 2011 at 9:24 pm | Permalink

      David S,
      See Mary’s response to comment #17 above.

      • David S
        Posted January 17, 2011 at 9:56 pm | Permalink

        Thanks Gazza! Got it now… I had 7d in wrong (was thinking about a small study in a library).
        Phew…!