Toughie 447

Toughie No 447 by Beam

I did it My Way!

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BD Rating – Difficulty ***Enjoyment ****

Ray T’s second outing as a Toughie setter was quite enjoyable. Once you get used to the stretched definitions, the clues are straightforward if a bit tough.

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought. You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.

Across

7a    Spitfire say, producing trail following turn (8)
{WARPLANE} – a Spitfire. or a Hurricane, is constructed by putting a country trail after a turn or twist

9a    Onset of sudden agony gripping radius (6)
{SPRAIN} – in this all-in-one clue S (onset of Sudden) and agony are placed around (gripping) R(adius)

10a    Picture villain following triad’s central character (4)
{ICON} – a religious picture is derived by putting a villain after I (trIad’s central character)

11a    Giving a hand around the house? (10)
{APPLAUDING} – clapping hands in the auditorium

12a    Sport includes each player’s opening stand (6)
{TEAPOY} – a word meaning to sport is placed around EA(ch) and P (Player’s opening) to get a small three-legged table or stand, especially one that holds a caddy.

14a    Reportedly much used by sailor as a guide (8)
{LODESTAR} – what sounds like {reportedly) much is followed by a sailor to get something much used by a sailor as a guide – “used” appears to be there only to improve the surface reading


15a    Trails from snails’ ends reduced inside (6)
{SPOORS} – these trails are created by starting with SS (SnailS’ ends) with reduced, as in reduced quality, inside

17a    Gold and oil supplier for Blair, originally (6)
{ORWELL} – combine the heraldic term for gold with an oil producer to get the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, author of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four


20a    Second shot after warning shout clearing woods? (8)
{FORESTRY} – put S(econd) and a shot or attempt after a warning shout on the golf course to get the task of clearing woods

22a    Lets out lunatics losing head (6)
{UTTERS} – a verb meaning lets out or declares is created by removing the initial N (losing head) from some lunatics

23a    Feller left Brown with nothing! (10)
{LUMBERJACK} – this feller of trees is a charade of L(eft), a shade of brown and a word meaning nothing at all

Cue the Monty Python team:

24a    Broadcast contains hot performance (4)
{SHOW} – a verb meaning to broadcast seed is placed around (contains) H(ot) to get a performance

25a    Created by Dior, dainty frock (6)
{ORDAIN} – hidden inside (created by – I’m not sure about that as a hidden indicator) the clue is a verb meaning to frock or invest with priestly office

26a    Medicine can treat start of typhoid internally (8)
{TINCTURE} – in this semi-all-in-one clue, a medicine is built up from a can followed by a verb meaning to treat around T (start of typhoid)

Down

1d    Organ on endless groove (8)
{PANCREAS} – an organ of the body is a charade of a the Greek god of pastures, flocks, and woods (pipe player) and a groove without its final letter (endless)

2d    Bridge player with slam in bridge (4)
{SPAN} – one of the four bridge players is followed by a verb meaning to slam or criticise to get a bridge

3d    In the morning, rising with ‘female complaint’ (6)
{MALADY} – the abbreviation for morning is reversed (rising) and is followed by a female with refined manners and instincts to get a complaint

4d    Man’s man? (8)
{ISLANDER} – someone from the Isle of Man, or Skye, or ……

5d    Shot one steer on trail (10)
{IRIDESCENT} – this one gave me more trouble than most – an adjective meaning shot or rainbow-coloured, as in shot silk, is a charade of I(one), to steer and a trail ;left by an animal – stretching the meanings of the definition and some of the wordplay made this more difficult


6d    Girl one’s turned over to get brown (6)
{SIENNA} – take a girl’s name and I’S (one’s) and reverse all to get a fine pigment made from ferruginous ochreous earth, originally browny-yellow but warm reddish-brown when roasted

8d    Bans lovemaking exercise left top to tail! (6)
{EXPELS} – a word meaning bans is derived by taking a word meaning lovemaking, some physical exercise L(eft) then moving the first letter to the end (top to tail)

13d    Notorious document Blair modified (10)
{PROVERBIAL} – a valid synonym for notorious, but not one that came readily to mind, is built from a verb meaning to document and an anagram (modified} of BLAIR

16d    Coy going to bed (8)
{RETIRING} – a double definition

18d    Old port for sailors (8)
{LARBOARD} – the word that sailors used to use for the left

19d    Dictator typically ends by shouting (6)
{TYRANT} – a dictator or oppressive ruler is constructed from the ends of TypicallY and a word meaning shouting

21d    Gallery not opening holding Braque’s final work (6)
{OEUVRE} – knowing that Ray T lives in Paris is a help in finding the gallery – it’s the one that houses the Mona Lisa – lose its first letter (not opening) and then insert E (BraquE‘s final) to get an artist’s work – does anyone know Braque’s final work and where it is housed?

22d    Rotten boxed by punk in Damned (6)
{UNKIND} – a word meaning rotten or callous is hidden inside (boxed by) the rest of the clue – allusions here to Johnny Rotten, the Sex Pistols (who considered calling themselves The Damned) and The Damned (who did)

24d    For the audience, horror scene (4)
{SITE} – a homophone (for the audience) of a horror gives the scene of an event

Ray T’s transition into a Toughie setter has allowed him to push the boundaries of his definitions even more than in his daily puzzles.

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19 Comments

  1. Posted October 26, 2010 at 2:06 pm | Permalink

    I very much enjoyed this and found it an improvement on Beam’s first showing which I didn’t consider a real Toughie. Favourite for me was 5d for all the reasons that made it difficult.
    As an aside, I have felt recently that the difficulty levels in the Toughies have become rather polarised with not much in the middle ground difficulty. This sort of puzzle fits the gap quite nicely.
    Thanks to BD and the shining one!

  2. crypticsue
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 2:07 pm | Permalink

    Only struggled with two of these – one being 5d as I was for a long time miles away from the type of ‘shot’! My other struggle was with 21d and yes I did search to see if I could find which was Braque’s final work, without success. Thanks to the Beaming Mr T for the crossword and BD for the review.

  3. Franco
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 2:28 pm | Permalink

    Quite liked the mini-theme of the Blair-Brown coalition – however, I had hoped that we’d seen the last of them!

    Favourites: 4d + 18d + 17a. Surprised that in 23a – “Jack” by itself can mean “nothing” – thought it was “Jack ****”.

    Thanks to Beam and BD

    • Franco
      Posted October 26, 2010 at 2:57 pm | Permalink

      PS. Noticed that all the solutions are one-word answers – quite rare? – or is this a trademark of the setter?

      • Posted October 26, 2010 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

        Very much a trademark, although one or two recent puzzles have had multi-word answers.

  4. brendam
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 4:11 pm | Permalink

    What can I say? Needed B.D’s hints to finish but quite pleased with what I managed on my own. I don’t think I’m getting better, it’s more lateral thinking in the interpretation of the clue so 4d for example I knew at once __ and was right!! But some setters I can’t “get into” at all. How DO you bloggers manage to come up with the answers ALWAYS?I’ll never know but meanwhile I am happy to have a go and if I complete it, good, if I don’t, so what? It’s all mind-using exercise and I’d miss it very very much so thanks to setter and blogger

    • Posted October 26, 2010 at 4:28 pm | Permalink

      Brendam

      Some days it’s a close-run thing!

  5. Jezza
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 4:11 pm | Permalink

    The bottom half seemed to go in very quickly, with the top taking considerably longer. 17a confused me for a while, until I recalled it from an earlier puzzle somewhere.
    It also helps to read the clue properly (triad’s central character is obviously I and not A – more haste, less speed!).
    Overall, quite good fun. Thanks to Beam and to BD.

  6. BigBoab
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

    Very enjoyable crossword from RayT, loved 17a as I spent some time trying to fit it into the Blair/Brown theme, I wrote down the answer to 5d at the top of the page but could not get it to fit with what I thought was its meaning, finally checked the Big Red Book and found that it could sort of mean shot. Hard work but fun, thanks BD and RayT.

  7. Nubian
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 4:39 pm | Permalink

    I enjoyed that and managed to drag it out all day. Better than todays cryptic I fancy.
    Thanks Ray T and B Dave for saving the day.

  8. Prolixic
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 5:57 pm | Permalink

    Another vote for an enjoyable Toughie. Thanks to Beam for the fun and to BD for the review.

  9. Beam
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 6:43 pm | Permalink

    Many thanks to BD for the explanations, and to all who took the time to comment.

    Ray T

    • Franco
      Posted October 26, 2010 at 6:53 pm | Permalink

      Wot! You needed the explanations as well?

      Thank, Ray T, for a very enjoyable puzzle on a wet and miserable day!

  10. ChrisH
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 7:06 pm | Permalink

    Quite pleased to have managed to complete this without the blog. I never seem to have the problems with RayT’s clues that I have with some other setters. As mentioned above, a nice middle-ground toughie. Thanks Ray.

  11. nanaglugglug
    Posted October 26, 2010 at 7:38 pm | Permalink

    Really good crossword – thoroughly enjoyed it and Hotlips thought 17a was absolutely brilliant! (Its his birthday today, so its nice that he enjoyed this!)

  12. Posted October 26, 2010 at 8:06 pm | Permalink

    Most enjoyable Toughie since the previous most enjoyable Toughie, which definitely wasn’t Elgar or anything else last week and probably the week before that.

  13. Derek
    Posted October 27, 2010 at 8:03 am | Permalink

    Finished this puzzle very early this morning. Quite enjoyable but not as tough as usual.
    I liked 13a, 17a, 23a, 1d, 5d, 16d & 21d – not the chestnut Tate for once!).

    I know that Braque painted a ceiling in the Louvre but don’t know if this was his final work.

    • Posted October 27, 2010 at 10:21 am | Permalink

      The ‘Birds Ceiling’ in the Louvre is his only work there, commissioned in 1953, ten years before his death. He didn’t produce a great deal after this, his final works probably in 1958 the completion of his ‘Atelier’ series again on the theme of birds.
      His funeral oration was given at the Louvre – final, but presumably someone else’s work.
      I know, I should get out more…………

  14. pommette
    Posted October 28, 2010 at 1:52 pm | Permalink

    Sorry for posting late – in UK with imited access. In fact, flew out on Tuesday and only did this on CrypticSue advice so bought the DT at the airport.
    Got the bottom half in fairly quickly on the flight then it took us another 24 hours to get all but 12a. Got the construction but it isn’t a word we’d ever come across!
    Thanks Beam and BD for a thoroughly enjoyable puzzle.
    PS CrypticSue thanks for asking after me last week – back in the land of crosswords again. Visitors gone home and new website now built so I can get back to the DT!