Toughie 355

Toughie No 355 by Campbell

A Festival of Fire and Vampyres!

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BD Rating – Difficulty **Enjoyment ***

A entertaining, if straightforward, puzzle from Campbell. A certain amount of General Knowledge is required, but most of this will be familiar to regular solvers.

Please leave a comment telling us what you thought. You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.


Across

7a    Circle deadheaded rose, thorny (7)
{SPINOSE} – to turn round in a circle together with (R)OSE (deadheaded rose) gives a synonym for thorny

8a    Orderly’s codeword (7)
{UNIFORM} – a word meaning orderly is also a code word from the NATO phonetic alphabet that is also used in radio communication

10a    Bar, place abroad stocking soft fruit (4-5)
{CRAB-APPLE} – an anagram (abroad) of BAR PLACE placed around P (piano, soft) gives a wild fruit – we have a tree full of these in our front garden

11a    Grandma’s sculpture? (5)
{MOSES} – a double definition – this Grandma was a renowned American folk artist or a sculpture by Michelangelo

12a    Oceanic bird’s occasional visit to New York (5)
{NODDY} – to get this oceanic bird of the tern family put a word meaning occasional inside (visit) New York

13a    Film of a lake in European country (9)
{AUSTRALIA} – actually two different films, made in 1989 and 2008 – you find the name by inserting A L(ake) inside a European country

15a    Body of troops ordered to carry equipment (7)
{BRIGADE} – a body of troops is constructed from a word meaning ordered placed around (carry) equipment

17a    Novelist and daughter ahead of disorderly crowd (7)
{DRABBLE} – to get this novelist put D(aughter) in front of a disorderly crowd – possibly Gooners!


18a    A fortune’s blown exposing vampire (9)
{NOSFERATU} – an anagram (blown) of A FORTUNE’S gives this film about vampires (or even vampyres)

20a    King’s ambassador and staff (5)
{HEROD} – this reviled biblical king is a charade of a title given to an ambassador and a staff

21a    A symbol of fertility in the outskirts of Nairobi? (5)
{NANDI} – to get this Hindu bull which symbolizes fertility simply spell out the letters at each end (outskirts) of NairobI

23a    Paul and Hayley, mostly, organised a festival (2-5-2)
{UP-HELLY-AA} – an anagram (organised) of PAUL and most of HAYLE(Y) gives this annual festival held at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands – I might have struggled with this if I hadn’t seen it before; we must be due a return visit from the (unrelated) Britannia Coconutters!


24a    Small surviving navigational instrument (7)
{SEXTANT} – combine S(mall) and a word meaning surviving to get this navigational instrument

25a    Doorkeeper flying to Syria (7)
{OSTIARY} – this church doorkeeper is an anagram (flying?) of TO SYRIA

Down

1d           Random strikes around newly-constructed NI dams (3-3-4)
{HIT-AND-MISS} – a hyphenated word meaning random is built up from strikes around an anagram (newly-constructed) of NI DAMS

2d           Ring after noon and attempt to engage a public official (6)
{NOTARY} – put O (ring) after N(oon) and follow it with an attempt around (to engage) A to get a public official

3d           What restaurants in Tokyo do as a memento? (8)
{KEEPSAKE} – split this memento as (4,4) and it could be what restaurants in Tokyo do

4d           Imprisonment of the Parisian on ship (6)
{DURESS} – a charade of DU (of, French / Parisian) RE (on, concerning) and the ubiquitous Steam Ship

5d           Upset Italian girl locking up a liqueur (3,5)
{TIA MARIA} – reverse (upset) IT(alian) then follow it with a girl’s name with A in between (locking up) to get this liqueur

6d           Waterloo Station’s architect (4)
{LOOS} – the name of a Czech-born Austrian architect is hidden inside the first two words

7d           Back crazy supporting acts in vaudeville (6,7)
{SECOND BANANAS} – combine synonyms for to back and mad to get these vaudeville support acts

9d           Married lady’s worried about son in old soap (3,5,5)
{MRS DALE’S DIARY} – an anagram (worried) of MARRIED LADY’S is placed around S(on) to get this old radio soap about the life of a married lady – excellent surface reading, but probably a bit difficult for younger solvers


14d         Disrespect shown over international symbol of freedom (7,3)
{LIBERTY CAP} – combine disrespect, in the sense of familiarity, with (over, as this is a down clue) the trophy awarded to an international sportsman to get this symbol of freedom – Marianne, the emblem of the French Republic, is often shown wearing one

16d         Cinerama developed in US (8)
{AMERICAN} – an anagram (developed) of CINERAMA gives someone who lives in the US

17d         Infantryman’s son after money (8)
{DOUGHBOY} – this United States infantryman, especially one in the First World War, is built up from a lad (son) after a colloquial term for money

19d         Perception shown by university in a large town (6)
{ACUITY} – a word meaning perception, or sharpness of mind, is built up by putting U(niversity) in A and a large town

20d         Healthy drinking it, a mineral (6)
{HALITE} – put a word often associated with being healthy around IT to get rock salt

22d         Ten falling into trap immediately after (4)
{NEXT} – put the Roman numeral for ten inside a trap to catch butterflies or fish to get a word meaning immediately after

As Digby mentions below, this is a toughie with a small t – unless the films, festivals or radio soaps were unfamiliar to you.

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24 Comments

  1. Sue
    Posted May 18, 2010 at 2:39 pm | Permalink

    Any chance of a hint for the second bit of 14 d. Its the only bit I haven’t got of this toughie which I found just right entertainment and difficultywise, and I go home at 3 so I need to know or it will drive me mad.

    • Haplogy
      Posted May 18, 2010 at 2:42 pm | Permalink

      Hi Sue
      Not heard of it in terms of the clue unless magic mushrooms are somehow liberating ;-)

      • Posted May 18, 2010 at 2:47 pm | Permalink

        This is indeed a psychedelic mushroom), but the “international” part of the clue is what is traditionally awarded to a sportsman who represents his country – David Beckham has 115 of them!

        • Haplogy
          Posted May 18, 2010 at 2:49 pm | Permalink

          Doh! should have seen that one

          • Sue
            Posted May 18, 2010 at 2:51 pm | Permalink

            Thanks everyone for the help – psychedelic mushrooms don’t feature much in my lifestyle – hence the struggle. PS: is Campbell a new setter?? Off home for a lovely walk in the sun now.

            • Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

              Sue

              If you select the setters name from the Category widget in the sidebar you will find that he has set 9 puzzles since the blog started.

    • Prolixic
      Posted May 18, 2010 at 2:50 pm | Permalink

      Sue, the second part of the clue is a reference to CAP being another term for a sportsman or woman who has been selected to play for their country in an international match.

  2. Prolixic
    Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

    A gentle start to the Toughie week. Many thanks to Campbell for an ejoyable puzzle and to BD for the notes. Hope Tilsit is back with us before too long.

  3. BigBoab
    Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

    Gentle stroll in the park today, I liked 9d and 14d. Thanks BD and thanks Campbell.

  4. digby
    Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

    Yes, a toughie (small t). But I am not a soap fan. Do I need to be to get 9d? Mrs 5,5. A little help, please, before I head home.

    • Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

      It was a long-running radio serial starring, latterly, Jessie Mathews as a middle-class housewife.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mrs_Dale%27s_Diary

      • digby
        Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:59 pm | Permalink

        Dummy! Of course!! Not helped by putting N instead of D at the end of 20a!!! Thank you, gentlemen.

    • gazza
      Posted May 18, 2010 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

      It’s the title of an old radio soap in which the title character was always “worried about Jim” so the wording of the clue is quite clever.

      • digby
        Posted May 18, 2010 at 4:12 pm | Permalink

        I’m trying to bring the signature tunee to mind – does anyone have a link to it?

        • Posted May 18, 2010 at 4:19 pm | Permalink

          You need to go about a minute into this clip!

          [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzFHGfusy1Q&rel=0&w=309&h=250]

          or try this:

          http://www.turnipnet.com/radio/mrsdalesdiary.wav

          • digby
            Posted May 18, 2010 at 4:28 pm | Permalink

            Thanks BD – you are a veritable “Mine”!! Apparantly the first 4000 episodes were lost, as the Beeb just re-recorded over previous tapes. What a shame!?

            • Rupert
              Posted May 18, 2010 at 6:04 pm | Permalink

              MDD was on just after the Jimmy Young Show, if I recall.

              “What’s the recipe today, Raymondo?”

      • Sue
        Posted May 19, 2010 at 8:47 am | Permalink

        Hands up all us 1950 children who said to themselves “I’m worried about Jim” as they wrote in the answer to the clue!

  5. Posted May 18, 2010 at 4:14 pm | Permalink

    Equally enjoyable for me as the standard Cryptic today. I personally prefer the less-tough Toughies as an extra and perhaps slightly harder DT Cryptic in a similar style. As such, I would rate this for difficulty 2/3* as a Toughie and 4* as a standard Cryptic. 4* worth of enjoyment for me.
    9d superb clue because of the ‘worried about son’ aspect, as Gazza mentions above. But I’m old enough to remember my mother listening to the BBC Light Programme all day every day
    5d – isn’t that a brand-name? I know one of you Blogmeisters takes umbrage about that sort of usage, but I forget which of you….

    • Posted May 18, 2010 at 4:23 pm | Permalink

      Except that it was Jim, her husband, that she was always worried about!

  6. gnomethang
    Posted May 18, 2010 at 4:46 pm | Permalink

    I needed some help to confirm 11a and 23a (although the anagram was clear) and also to confirm 21a as the wordplay eluded me.
    Apart from that the rest was fairly non-toughie but enjoyable nonetheless.
    Thanks for the review and thanks to Campbell.

  7. Posted May 18, 2010 at 5:32 pm | Permalink

    All that talk about magic mushrooms confused me.

    Of course, it is another name for Phrygian cap

    • Posted May 18, 2010 at 5:37 pm | Permalink

      No confusion intended.

      The picture links to the Wikipedia article about the Phrygian / Liberty cap.