ST 2523

Sunday Telegraph Cryptic No 2523

A full analysis by Peter Biddlecombe

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BD Rating – Difficulty *** Enjoyment ****

As you probably expected, your Sunday setter took full advantage of the puzzle appearing on Valentine’s day. Every clue is about romance, and so are many answers.

Across
1 To teasingly excite desire is a talent, in a way (9)
TANTALISE = anag. of “is a talent”
6 Darling embracing second love – that’s saucy for an Italian (5)
PESTO – S=second in PET=darling, then O=love
9 Tragic lover’s letter, as heard on radio (5)
ROMEO – R in the radio alphabet
10 People getting passionate when they go to the pictures? (3-6)
ART LOVERS – cryptic definition, “pictures” being paintings, not your chance to snog in the back row
11/22 Nothing accomplishes global revolution – so people romantically suppose (4,5,3,5,2,5)
LOVE MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND – LOVE = nothing, MAKES THE WORLD GO ROUND = accomplishes global revolution
14 Adore us madly, being full of passion (7)
AROUSED = anag. of “adore us”
16 Excessively cares for girl embraced back in Greek island (7)
COSSETS – reverse of TESS in COS = Greek island
17 Diamonds produced in middle of romantic evening (3)
ICE – hidden word
18 Faces people behaving amorously (7)
KISSERS – 2 definitions
20 Name of girl combining passion with energy (7)
DESIREE = DESIRE,E
26 Brother ogling and being playful (9)
MONK=brother,EYING
27 Tune composed about one meaning to get married (5)
UNITE – I=one in anag. of TUNE
28 Point about time being short in cosy places for lovebirds (5)
NESTS – T=time, in NESS = point = headland
29 Valentine from Verona, for example, for a courteous chap (9)
GENTLEMAN – Valentine is one of Shakespeare’s two gents from Verona (Proteus is the other)
Down
1 Originally try love as novice (4)
TYRO = anag. of try, O=love
2 Rose’s sweetness isn’t dependent on this, according to 9’s lover (4)
NAME – Juliet tells us “that which we call a rose, By any other name would smell as sweet”
3 Get excited, mostly about doctor being romantic (7)
AMOROUS – M.O. = doctor, in AROUSE(d)
4 Silly dalliance, romance, and love all end thus (5)
INANE = “in an E” – final letter of the three words mentioned
5 Admission at end of card – swept off one’s feet (9)
ENTRANCED – ENTRANCE = admission = permission to enter, D = “end of carD”
6 Under pressure, loved ones can be insincere types (7)
PHONEYS – P=pressure, HONEYS = loved ones
7 Weather set badly for recipient of Valentine (10)
SWEETHEART – anag. of “weather set”
8 Romantic meal that could make sweet story (6,4)
OYSTER STEW = anag. of “sweet story”
12 Notice a couple of points warning they could be femmes fatales? (10)
MARKSWOMEN – MARK = notice (verb), SW = “a couple of points”, OMEN = warning
13 They launch Cupid’s darts and play violins etc. (10)
BOWSTRINGS – “bow strings” = “play violins etc.”
15 In Sherwood, is Robin gently preparing to make love? (9)
DISROBING – hidden word
19 Like either part of eternity ring (7)
ENDLESS – describing both “eternity” and “ring”
21 Liable to arouse passion, unless ordered outside area (7)
SENSUAL – A=area in anag. of UNLESS
23 Paper heart, perhaps (5)
ORGAN – two definitions
24 Initially fell in love making ‘Love Story’, for example (4)
FILM – first letters of words in clue
25 Juliet, for one, in passionate entanglement (4)
TEEN – hidden word – from memory, Juliet is about fifteen
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4 Comments

  1. Posted February 19, 2010 at 12:14 pm | Permalink

    I’m not going to bother picking out individual clues for their greatness as there are just too many. This is possibly the best and most complete thematic puzzle I’ve ever solved, an absolute masterpiece. I could fill another ten lines of text with superlatives, and I really feel sorry for anyone who didn’t get the chance to tackle this crossword.

    Top marks, laurels, even the entire collection of Olympic gold medals to the setter.

    • Libellule
      Posted February 19, 2010 at 1:09 pm | Permalink

      Anax,
      I can only agree with you. I tried to explain how good this was to my wife. Unfortunately the concept of cryptic crosswords is lost on her. However she did understand the theme – thank goodness!

    • Prolixic
      Posted February 19, 2010 at 1:16 pm | Permalink

      Agreed. As I said on Sunday it was not just a crossword it was a work of art.

  2. sarumite
    Posted February 19, 2010 at 10:39 pm | Permalink

    Can only reiterate my comment from Sunday .. loved it!!