DT 26045

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 26045

Hints and tips by Big Dave

+ – + – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty *** Enjoyment ***

It was nice to get going on this typical Rufus puzzle after my earlier brush with DT 49.  I had missed the wonderful cryptic definitions that are to be found here.

Leave a comment telling us what you thought. You can also add your assessment by selecting from one to five stars at the bottom of the post.

Across

1a Drawing instrument traditionally boxed (7)
{COMPASS} – this drawing instrument, often found in a geometry set, has the same name as the instrument that is traditionally boxed in the action of boxing the compass (naming all thirty-two principal points of the compass in clockwise order)

5a Explorer needs one in support (7)
{PIONEER} – an explorer who is created by putting ONE (not I this time) inside a PIER (support)

9a Gloss over backward barrister breaking a rule inadvertently (7)
{LACQUER} – a word meaning to coat with gloss comes from QC (barrister) reversed (backward) inside an anagram (inadvertently) of A RULE – I did like this anagram indicator!

10a Always the first to set out for the mountain (7)
{EVEREST} – a charade of EVER (always) first followed by an anagram (out) of SET gives the World’s highest mountain – “the” as padding seems unnecessary


11a Did not turn out as intended (9)
{OVERSLEPT} – a cryptic definition of the act of not getting out of bed on time

12a Woman gets directions in Polish (5)
{SHEEN} – a charade of SHE (woman) followed by E(ast) and N(orth) (directions) gives a synonym for polish

13a Too high a price to be on the level (5)
{STEEP} – a semi-cryptic double definition

15a Agents get sealed orders (9)
{DELEGATES} – these agents are an anagram (orders) of GET SEALED – admire the wonderful surface reading; this is how to write an anagram as a clue!

17a Drags Irma out for the carnival (5,4)
{MARDI GRAS} – an anagram (out) of DRAGS IRMA gives the French carnival called “Fat Tuesday”

19a The top decoration for the Pope (5)
{TIARA} – a cryptic definition of of the headgear worn by a Pope, or a Lady

22a This said, repair is immediate (5)
{LEAST} – a play on the idiom LEAST said, soonest mended

23a Possibly slips beneath surface of river (9)
{UNDERWEAR} – items of clothing that include slips are a charade of UNDER (beneath) and WEAR (river)

25a Is embraced by a wish for a sweet (7)
{ANISEED} – put IS inside (embraced by) A NEED (a wish) for the seed of the anise which is used to flavour boiled sweets called aniseed balls – strictly speaking aniseed is not the sweet itself


26a College crowd (7)
{TRINITY} – a double definition based on Trinity College (there a quite a few of them!) and “three’s a crowd”

27a She may turn out a successful actress (7)
{DRESSER} – this person could be dressing (turning out) a successful actress

28a One needs a couple of rings to get this number (7)
{HUNDRED} – put together 1 (one) and 00 (a couple of rings) and you get 100

Down

1d Being hardened, a summons symbolises nothing to us (7)
{CALLOUS} – a synonym for hardened is a charade of CALL (summons) O (symbolises nothing) and US

2d Teach me to twist the knife (7)
{MACHETE} – an anagram (to twist) of TEACH ME gives us this heavy knife or cutlass

3d Adjoins, yet put in as an extra clue (5)
{ABUTS} – a word meaning adjoins is also defined (an extra clue) by BUT (yet) inside AS

5d Exercise around meadow and fold (5)
{PLEAT} – put PT (Physical Training / exercise) around LEA (meadow) and you get a fold in a skirt

6d Finished with a sense of failure (9)
{OVERSIGHT} – a charade of OVER (finished) and SIGHT (a sense) lead to a failure to notice something

7d Fire — or part of one (7)
{ELEMENT} – Earth, Air, Fire and Water were the elements of earlier civilisations, and it can also be a bar on an electric fire

8d Grades metal with kids outside (7)
{RATINGS} – these grades come from TIN (metal) with RAGS (kids in the sense of makes fun of) outside

14d Quite vain, to be blunt (9)
{POINTLESS} – a double definition in which we have vain, as in a vain or pointless attempt, and blunt, as in having no sharp point

16d Place to finally fight terminal depression (4,5)
{LAST DITCH} – the final place in which to fight is a charade of LAST (terminal) and DITCH (depression)

17d Beat up fat bird (7)
{MALLARD} – here LAM (beat) is reversed (up) and followed by LARD (fat) to get a kind of wild duck

18d Sell genuine ones over end of June (7)
{REALISE} – here REALISE, as in to realise one’s assets, is built up from REAL (genuine) and I S (ones) over (because it’s a down clue) E (end of JunE)

20d A row outside the Spanish workshop (7)
{ATELIER} – put A TIER (a row) outside EL (the, Spanish) to get a workshop or artist’s studio – if this is a new word for you then remember it as it is sure to come up again being, the only word that fits the pattern A?E?I?R

21d Dressed in a dreary outfit (7)
{ARRAYED} – a word meaning dressed in comes from an anagram (outfit) of A DREARY – outfit must be borderline as an anagram indicator

23d Not above using two foreign articles (5)
{UNDER} – this tired clue for “not above” is a charade of UN (a, French) and DER (the, German)

24d Put curb round gelding’s head to get control (5)
{REIGN} – a horsey flavour to this clue puts REIN (curb) around G(elding) to get a period of control

Now on to finish reviewing DT 49!

DT 26045 - Answers

DT 26045 - Answers


12 Comments

  1. Andy
    Posted September 28, 2009 at 4:29 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Liked this one today, learnt a new word – 20d. Had difficulties with 26ac for a while and totally missed the anagram pointer in 15ac for 2-3 hrs.

  2. Nubian
    Posted September 28, 2009 at 4:36 pm | Permalink | Reply

    BD,
    I think putting the compass in a box also allows you to have it on gimbles in case you pop down to your yacht for the weekend……
    What a day for crossys, you must be exhausted

    • Posted September 28, 2009 at 4:40 pm | Permalink | Reply

      I have done two in a day before, but I usually get an early start if forewarned.

      I was quite pleased to find a picture of a compass in a box, even though that was not what was intended by the clue.

      • Nubian
        Posted September 28, 2009 at 4:57 pm | Permalink | Reply

        What I did find wierd was I thought of compass as in points of, and the drawing tools was the last thing on my mind. Must have been with being the RN,,,,bravo to you anyway Sir!

  3. Barrie
    Posted September 28, 2009 at 6:20 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Bit weak today. Could someone explain to me 17d. How do you get Mallard from ‘beat up fat duck’ other than that a mallard is a duck?

    • Posted September 28, 2009 at 6:23 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Barrie

      Online the clue was “Beat up fat bird ” and I have explained it above.

      • Barrie
        Posted September 28, 2009 at 10:07 pm | Permalink | Reply

        Thanks Dave, thats a another new word I’ve learnt!

  4. bigboab
    Posted September 28, 2009 at 6:45 pm | Permalink | Reply

    not worth a comment really, too easy!

  5. Little Dave
    Posted September 28, 2009 at 7:58 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Like 5a but thought 26a was quite weak. Otherwise reasonably straightforward and a gentle saunter to commence the week.

  6. Jane
    Posted September 28, 2009 at 9:16 pm | Permalink | Reply

    No problems with today but re. 1a, I was taught that a compass is used for finding directions and that a pair of compasses is used for drawing. Remember geometry at school!

    • sarumite
      Posted September 28, 2009 at 9:46 pm | Permalink | Reply

      … and Chambers agrees with you Jane, indicating that only used in the plural form should compass(es) relate to the drawing instrument.
      But perhaps we should allow the setter a little artistic license here? :smile:

      Not had chance to look at crosswords today owing to hospital visiting! :cool:

  7. Kev
    Posted September 29, 2009 at 9:46 am | Permalink | Reply

    A belated comment – I work very strange shifts!! 22a, 25a, 27a, 14d, 17d – the bottom left-hand corner, in fact.
    Aaaargh! I should have got all of them – I hang my head in shame . . .

Leave a Reply, but please read the Comment Etiquette (under Comment on the menu) first. If you are asking a question, please check if it is already answered in the FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions).

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *