DT 25993

Daily Telegraph Cryptic No 25993

Hints and tips by Big Dave

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BD Rating – Difficulty ** Enjoyment ***

This is turning out to be  “New Solvers Week” as we are presented with another relatively easy puzzle.  It’s on days like this that you get the full benefits of retirement – torrential rain and no need to go outside!

Two years ago this month I was returning home on a Friday evening and only got as far as Moreton-in-the-Marsh, where the High Street had turned into a river.  I spent the night in a pub (things could have been a lot worse!) and finally managed to reach Hanley Swan on Saturday evening.

Across

1a Failure knocking back beer at college (4-2)
{SLIP-UP} – this failure is derived by reversing (knocking back) PILS (beer) and then adding UP (at college)

5a Take the place of mostly loose six footer (8)
{SUPPLANT} – to take the place of is SUPPL(E) (mostly loose) and ANT (six footer)

9a Very fashionable silver? Sound on the outside (3,3,4)
{ALL THE RAGE} – a phrase meaning very fashionable comes from AG (silver) with ALL THERE (sound) on the outside

10a Silent figure among commuters (4)
{MUTE} – this silent figure is hidden (among) comMUTErs

11a Temporary home with frilly lace? Good feeling comes from it (8)
{TENTACLE} – combine TENT (temporary home) with an anagram (frilly) of LACE and you get something from which good feeling comes

12a One in Paris boarding fast revolutionary part of Metro? (6)
{TUNNEL} – put UN (one in French / in Paris) inside (boarding) LENT (fast) reversed (revolutionary) and you get part of the Metro (the Paris Underground)

13a Small measure in a round? Explosive stuff (4)
{AMMO} – take MM (millimetre / small measure) and put it inside A O (a round) to get some explosive stuff

15a Chivalrous sort reportedly getting drink for bird (8)
{NIGHTJAR} – a charade of NIGHT (sounds like knight / chivalrous sort reportedly) and JAR (drink) gives this bird

18a Minor engagement risks him getting twitchy (8)
{SKIRMISH} – this minor engagement is an anagram (twitchy) of RISKS HIM

19a Bank official retaining energy (4)
{REEF} – a type of bank that is derived by putting REF (referee / official) around (retaining) E(nergy)

21a Very large figure departs for port (6)
{OSTEND} – a charade of OS (OutSize / very large) TEN (figure) and D(eparts) gives this Belgian port

23a Organization rejecting liberal South African politicians and European direction (8)
{GUIDANCE} – a tricky charade of GUI(L)D (organization) without the L (rejecting Liberal) with ANC (African National Congress / South African politicians) and E(uropean) gives a synonym for direction

25a Show disapproval in this style (4)
{HISS} – to show disapproval is hidden in tHIS Style

26a A stirring factor in retirement? (5,5)
{ALARM CLOCK} – a cryptic definition of a device which wakes you up in the morning

27a Incentive to revamp slum site lacking sign of expenditure around university (8)
{STIMULUS} – this incentive comes from placing an anagram (revamp) of SLUM SIT(E) without the E (lacking sign of Expenditure) around U(niversity)

28a German wearing cosmetic to remain behind (6)
{LINGER} – put G(erman) inside (wearing) eye LINER (cosmetic) to get a synonym for to remain behind

Down

2d City badly kept by the French (5)
{LILLE} – this French city comes from ILL (badly) inside LE (the, French)

3d Love to tuck into exotic fruit after favourite fancy biscuit (5,4)
{PETIT FOUR} – put O (love) inside (to tuck into) an anagram (exotic) of FRUIT and after PET (favourite) to get a fancy biscuit

4d Pleasing thing about rector – what he regularly does? (6)
{PREACH} – here PEACH is a pleasing thing (a bit vague?) and it goes around R(ector) to get what the rector regularly does

5d Keen hints broadcast about a drug? A lurking menace (5,2,3,5)
{SNAKE IN THE GRASS} – an anagram (broadcast) of KEEN HINTS goes around (about) A and is followed by GRASS (drug) to get a lurking menace

6d Greedy chap restricting others beginning to enjoy status (8)
{PRESTIGE} – put PIG (greedy chap) around (restricting) REST (others) and followed by E (beginning to Enjoy) to get a word meaning status

7d Drink one missed before start of week? A disappointment (5)
{LEMON} – here you need (A)LE (drink) without the A (one missed) before MON(day) (start of week) to get a disappointment

8d Famous church that’s remote and in need of renovation (5,4)
{NOTRE DAME} – famous church is a bit of an understatement for this French cathedral which can be derived from an anagram (in need of renovation) of REMOTE AND

14d This fame developing about King is temporary (9)
{MAKESHIFT} – an anagram (developing) of THIS FAME around (about) K(ing) gives something that is temporary

16d Jack with girl endlessly requiring protection from rain (9)
{TARPAULIN} – TAR (jack / sailor) and PAULIN(E) (girl endlessly) give something that provides protection from the rain

17d Profit not expected from novel find in side of building (8)
{WINDFALL} – a synonym for unexpected profit is an anagram (novel) of FIND inside WALL (side of building)

20d Depressing ring about feminist getting promoted (6)
{DISMAL} – a word meaning depressing is derived by putting DIAL (ring) around (about) MS (Ms / feminist) reversed (getting promoted – one of those down-clue only constructs)

22d Course creep’s omitted? Not altogether (5)
{EPSOM} – the Derby is run at this racecourse which is hidden (not altogether) inside creEP’S OMitted

24d Store timeless stamp (5)
{CACHET} – a store that comes from CACHE(T) (stamp) without the T (Time less)

One or two convoluted clues, where you need to guess the answer and then try to work out the wordplay.  Overall a pleasant and not that difficult puzzle which is probably from the hand of one of my favourite setters!

Don’t forget that the answers can be revealed by selecting the space between the curly brackets.  You can give your assessment of this puzzle by selecting from 1 to 5 stars below.


29 Comments

  1. Lizwhiz
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 12:11 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Blue sky and sunshine here in Canterbury :)
    Liked 23a although I was thinking of something rotating, so was looking for an answer like sleepovers??

    • Posted July 29, 2009 at 12:14 pm | Permalink | Reply

      There won’t be any rain left by the time this weather gets to you!

    • mary
      Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:29 pm | Permalink | Reply

      wish it was like that here!!
      never mind nice day for crosswords, though i do enjoy doing them in the garden, no chance of that unfortunately!!

  2. Kram
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 12:50 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Hi Dave, mistype, no O required at end of Wall in 17d

    • Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:20 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for that, correction of error that was caused by big fingers hitting two keys at once is now applied!

  3. Roger
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:10 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Here in Mytholmroyd we didn’t find this particulary easy. There was a lot of guess first, work out later.
    (It isn’t raining just yet.)

    • mary
      Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:31 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Same here, i didn’t find todays particularly easy either, where is Mytholmroyd?????
      raining here, all day and all night!!

      • Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:38 pm | Permalink | Reply

        Is it ever any different in Wales?

        • mary
          Posted July 29, 2009 at 4:22 pm | Permalink | Reply

          believe it or not it is often very sunny!!!! :)
          i’ll let you know when next!!

          • Roger
            Posted July 29, 2009 at 4:26 pm | Permalink | Reply

            Mytholmroyd is near Hebden Bridge in West Yorkshire. It is really raining now!

          • mary
            Posted July 29, 2009 at 4:28 pm | Permalink | Reply

            Aha is it in West Yorkshire?????

            • mary
              Posted July 29, 2009 at 4:29 pm | Permalink | Reply

              nice here now !! thanks for the info

    • gazza
      Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:32 pm | Permalink | Reply

      What a great site this is for expanding one’s horizons! I’ve now found out where Mytholmroyd is – you’re practically a next door neighbour to Tilsit!

      • mary
        Posted July 29, 2009 at 4:23 pm | Permalink | Reply

        please enlighten me Gazza, I still din’t know where it is or have I missed something?!

        • Libellule
          Posted July 29, 2009 at 5:18 pm | Permalink | Reply

          Mary,
          Its to the west of Halifax in West Yorkshire, you can look it up on Google Maps.

          • mary
            Posted July 29, 2009 at 6:19 pm | Permalink | Reply

            thank you, will do

  4. bigboab
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 1:11 pm | Permalink | Reply

    This has been a poor week so far, slightly better than yesterday. Quite liked 23a.

  5. Andrew MB
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 2:13 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Lemon Squeezy! Which is a relief after not being able to finish yesterday’s crossword which everyone else seemed to find so straightforward.
    Favourites today were 11a and 26a.

    • mary
      Posted July 29, 2009 at 4:25 pm | Permalink | Reply

      after yesterday, todays was not so lemonsqueezy for me Andrew which just goes to show that we’re all different!

  6. Greenhorn
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 5:54 pm | Permalink | Reply

    A team effort failed to solve this one -much much harder than yesterdays. Failed on 19a, 21a, 26a ,8d,17d,24d &20d. The latter sums today’s effort up!

    • Posted July 29, 2009 at 5:58 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Perhaps you ought to get a transfer to a different team! I hear Manchester City are recruiting at the moment.

  7. philbro
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 9:31 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Enjoyable, although had to cheat on 23a; when I saw the answer could have kicked myself. Favourite today was 26a- brought a wry smile.

  8. Shamus
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 10:11 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Thanks for the blog and comments as ever. Re 4 down, “peach” is defined in Collins as a pleasing thing or person so hope it’s not too vague. It’s raining heavily in London now to keep up the meteorological theme!

    • Posted July 29, 2009 at 10:28 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Thanks for your explanation.

      The problem with peach, as far as I was concerned, is that while peach -> pleasing thing is easy to see, the other way round is not so easy.

      • Shamus
        Posted July 29, 2009 at 10:57 pm | Permalink | Reply

        Point taken, Big Dave, but hopefully crosschecking checking letters of p,e and c with r from “rector” somewhere inside would have helped. To someone who remembers the late Dan Maskell’s tennis commentary with his trademark comments of “peach of a shot” etc, it’s quite a distinctive usage!

  9. bigboab
    Posted July 29, 2009 at 10:33 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Bright sunshine all day in Kirkcaldy!!!

  10. Jason
    Posted July 30, 2009 at 7:05 am | Permalink | Reply

    Hi – I don’t get why OS is “very large” in 21A?

    • Libellule
      Posted July 30, 2009 at 7:54 am | Permalink | Reply

      Jason
      OS is an abbreviation of outsize

    • Posted July 30, 2009 at 10:52 am | Permalink | Reply

      I’ve updated the post.

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