Toughie 176

Toughie No 176 by Citrus

Easier than the regular cryptic?

+ – + – + – + – + – + – +

BD Rating – Difficulty ** Enjoyment ***

Tuesday seems to be a good day to tackle your first Toughie.  I sailed through this one, but enjoyed doing it.

Across

1a South American truck driver’s heading off for sewer (8)
{SEAMSTER} – an excellent start to the puzzle – combine S(outh) and (T)EAMSTER (American truck driver) without the T (heading off) to get a sewer, more often seen in the feminine version

5a Stars answer after a short month (6)
{OCTANS} – these stars are built from ANS(wer) following OCT(ober)

9a Crab-oil treated with carbon and phenol (8)
{CARBOLIC} – an anagram of CRAB-OIL and C (chemical symbol for Carbon) gives this other name for phenol

10a Supreme control of parliamentarian in Ireland (6)
{EMPIRE} – just put MP inside EIRE – it’s as simple as that!

12a Costing the earth? Just the opposite! (4,5)
{DIRT CHEAP} – straightforward cryptic definition

13a Sailor’s a foot behind at sea (5)
{ABAFT} – a charade of AB and A FT (a foot)

14a Conservative misses space to manoeuvre in recess (4)
{APSE} – an anagram of SPA(C)E

16a Malevolent look? (4,3)
{EVIL EYE} – an all-in-one of sorts – EVIL (malevolent) and EYE (look) give a malevolent look

19a When everything’s considered it’s a clue to awl (3,4)
{ALL TOLD} – all sounds like awl, so ALL TOLD could be a clue to which the answer is awl – are you lost yet?

21a Prohibit Democratic group (4)
{BAND} – BAN plus D(emocratic) equals BAND

24a Girl’s rage starts to needle everyone (5)
{IRENE} – she comes from IRE (rage) and the starts to Needle and Everyone

25a Stars are a major attraction at the fair (3,6)
{BIG DIPPER} – continuing the astronomical theme, another name for The Plough, part of Ursa Major, is also roller-coaster at the fairground

27a A burden positioned like this (6)
{ACROSS} – A and CROSS (a burden) – this would not have worked as a down clue!

28a Use heat to harden plastic tile in resin-based material (8)
{BAKELITE} – a charade of BAKE and an anagram of TILE, which is signalled by plastic, to give plastic-like material – a lot of early radios were encased by this material


29a Inner nature of Indies going west (6)
{INSIDE} – straightforward anagram of INDIES, where going west is meant to make you think that this across clue involves a reversal but is instead an anagram indicator

30a Very idle bowling a no-ball, perhaps (8)
{DELIVERY} – an anagram of VERY IDLE gives a cricketing term

Down

1d Withdraw to consider admitting leader of colonists to Delaware (6)
{SECEDE} – SEE (consider) around (admitting) C (leader of Colonists) and finally DE (Delaware)

2d Dawn’s subtle emanation infused with yellow (6)
{AURORA} – AURA (subtle emanation) around (infused with) OR (yellow) – OR is a term used in heraldry for gold or yellow (new entry for The Mine is in progress!)


3d Seneca for one played coits (5)
{STOIC} – Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Roman orator and STOIC, is making his first appearance since T128 with a rather obvious anagram of COITS, Australian slang for the backside

4d Impressive core of genes common to both sexes (7)
{EPICENE} – EPIC (impressive) and core of gENEs

6d Ladder leading to the cabin of one travelling with you (9)
{COMPANION} – the first part of this double definition is a ladder on a ship

7d Disturbed old people drinking palm tea, we hear (8)
{AGITATED} – AGED (old people) around (drinking) ITA (the Moriche Palm) and T (tea, we hear)

8d Dutch Respect designer with a baton (8)
{SCEPTRED} – an anagram (designer) of D(utch) and RESPECT

11d See person holding up sword (4)
{ ÉPÉE } – a sword that is hidden (holding), reversed (up), in sEE PErson

15d In favour of local tax, Editor is examined (9)
{PROCESSED} – a charade of PRO (in favour of) CESS (local tax) and ED(itor)

17d Suicide wrongly fired hair with raki on (4-4)
{HARI-KARI} – this misspelt Japanese method of suicide is an anagram (fired) of HAIR and RAKI – see comments below

18d Quick movements as everybody runs and goes wild (8)
{ALLEGROS} – a musical term that comes from ALL plus an anagram of R(uns) and GOES

20d Expert starting to spear fish (4)
{DABS} – DAB (expert) and S (starting to Spear) give these fish

21d Cheeky young girl that might be packed up and sent off (7)
{BAGGAGE} –what might happen to a cheeky young girl! – we haven’t had one of these derogatory terms for the fairer sex for a while

22d It’s pale metamorphosed rock (6)
{APLITE} – here metamorphosed indicates an anagram of IT PALE to get a light-coloured igneous rock – but what is the ‘s doing in the middle of the fodder?


23d Brief article on English railway as a means of communication (6)
{ARTERY} – fine surface reading for this charade of ART(icle) E(nglish) and RY (railway)

26d Kill Northern island tribe (5)
{ICENI} – ICE (slang term for to kill), N(orthern) and I(sland) for an Ancient British tribe

Some excellent clues and one or two weak ones.  Your comments are welcome.


6 Comments

  1. bigboab
    Posted July 7, 2009 at 3:14 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Must just be me BD, I found this a hard one, I had the speling of 17d the other way round (as taught in school ) I didn’t get 5a without your help and Im still not sure if the 4th letter of 15d is c or f .

    • Posted July 7, 2009 at 3:24 pm | Permalink | Reply

      BigBoab

      I only got 5a from the wordplay.

      On 15d, a cess is an old tax.

      With 17d, this is what Chambers has to say: “hari-kari ~ an incorrect form of hara-kiri” thus endorsing your comment.

      I struggled with today’s cryptic, but found this one easy. I think a lot of it depends on havfing seen words like cess before.

      • gazza
        Posted July 7, 2009 at 3:40 pm | Permalink | Reply

        On 17d, I took the “wrongly” to mean that the setter was deliberately asking for the alternative, but incorrect, spelling.
        On 14a, I don’t like the use of “misses” to mean “missing from”.

        • Posted July 7, 2009 at 3:49 pm | Permalink | Reply

          On 17d I took “wrongly fired” as the anagram indicator, but, on reflection, your explanation is better.

          I agree on 14a.

          I also thought 22d was poor, with padding in the middle of the anagram fodder.

          • bigboab
            Posted July 7, 2009 at 5:04 pm | Permalink | Reply

            Thanks Dave, my wife has “loaned” my Chambers to my daughter, so I’m struggling without it. (I’m sort of hoping a new one might be arriving in a couple of weeks for my birthday. Hope springs eternal.

      • Libellule
        Posted July 7, 2009 at 5:21 pm | Permalink | Reply

        17d threw me too, until I cross checked the (mis) spelling on Screwed-up.

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