ST 2485 – Hints

Sunday Telegraph Cryptic No 2485 – Hints

Selected hints by Big Dave

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BD Rating – Difficulty ** Enjoyment ***

If anything this one was a bit too easy, with two well-known places and a not-so-well-known explorer who is hidden in the clue.

For the weekend prize crosswords I will select a few of the better clues and provide hints for them.  A full analysis of this puzzle will be available at 12.00 next Friday, 29th May.

Some hints to get you started:

Across

1a Explorer held by tribal boatmen (6)
This explorer who become the first European to lead an expedition to have reached the Pacific from the New World is hidden in the clue

11a Has potential to emerge as right artist for capital (8)
A charade leads to the capital of Australia

12a With style, arrange buttonhole (6)
Put together a method or style and a word meaning to arrange the cutlery on a table and you have a word meaning to gain someone’s attention in order to talk to them (to buttonhole)

28a European language – found around part of UK (6)
This European language has a dubious synonym for to found (confound would be better, but wouldn’t fit the wordplay ) around Northern Ireland (part of UK)

This European language has a dash (“-“) around Northern Ireland (part of UK) – thanks to Gazza and Kram for that one – I missed it completely, just as I missed : + y = colony back in January

Down

2d A legal procedure cut short in courts (5)
Here A followed by a legal procedure in a court to determine the guilt or innocence of a prisoner which is cut short (without the last letter) leads to a Latin word meaning central courtyards

6d Challenge about European rule in Eastern state (8)
Put a challenge around E(uropean) LAW and you get an state in the East of the USA

7d Opener bagging runs repeatedly for county (5)
A door opener around (bagging) R R (runs repeatedly) gives a county in Ireland

20d Rod on bottom, intended to sting (6)
A metal rod and the bottom of the sea together give a word meaning wounded or spiteful (intended to sting)

24d Extended accounts unchanged when set up (5)
This palindromic word (unchanged when set up) means extended accounts of the deeds of Icelandic or Norwegian heroes

I expect that you all found today’s puzzle as easy as I did, and let’s hope for a bigger challenge next Sunday.

4 Comments

  1. Kram
    Posted May 24, 2009 at 7:12 pm | Permalink

    28a has to be the worst clue ever being reliant on morse code, but inanely this does not apply to 26a.However the rest of the crossword was quite enjoyable.

    • gazza
      Posted May 24, 2009 at 8:27 pm | Permalink

      I recognise that I’m probably in a minority, but I actually love clues like 28a which involve a bit of lateral thinking.

    • Posted May 28, 2009 at 8:14 pm | Permalink

      I don’t understand the reference to “morse code”. The symbol “-” is a “dash” in plain English – you just need the wits to see it.

  2. Rollo
    Posted May 25, 2009 at 2:48 pm | Permalink

    This is one of the weekly puzzles that Phil McNeill from the Telegraph replied “Yes” to in answer to the question

    Can entries be printed from the CluedUp website?

    He went on to say that entries should be sent to the address in the newspaper. But presumably most people who subscribe to the CluedUp site don’t get the paper.

    It would be useful if they included the address in the FAQs, as they do for the Saturday Cryptic, which is the only one they do give the address for.

    Oh well!